Implementing research into a CNS residency: The impact of computerized triggers on early identification of sepsis.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/156962
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Implementing research into a CNS residency: The impact of computerized triggers on early identification of sepsis.
Author(s):
Bustraan, Lynne M.
Author Details:
Lynne M. Bustraan, RN,MS,MSN,CCRN, Florida Hospital, Orlando, Florida, USA, email: lbustraan@bellsouth.net
Abstract:
PURPOSE: Sepsis is life-threatening complication of critical illness. The purpose of this project was to evaluate a bedside monitoring application for its ability to detect sepsis. Because successful implementation of sepsis bundles hinge largely on early detection, a need for accurate and timely evaluation of the signs and symptoms of sepsis was needed. The project was begun during a CNS residency to learn essential competencies of CNS practice. DESCRIPTION: As an opportunity to develop CNS skills related to conduct of clinical research was afforded during the final residency in the CNS program. Because early recognition of sepsis is essential to increasing survival rates, a project was undertaken to evaluate a patient monitoring application to alert the nurse to potential signs and symptoms of sepsis (Protocol Watch, Philips Medical Systems, Andover, MA). During the CNS residency, implementation of this project included IRB approval, implementation of the monitoring system, staff education, data collection, and analysis. This project was conducted at 2 comparable facilities within a multihospital system. Data were collected before implementation to assess characteristics of patients with sepsis, time to recognition, and adherence to treatment recommendations. Implementation occurred over a 1-week period with education and training support from the vendor. Following implementation, data were collected to determine what nurses did when the sepsis trigger alarmed and to assess accurate recognition of sepsis and implementation of treatment protocols. EVALUATION/OUTCOMES:During project implementation, several key findings related to CNS practice were noted: lack of routine laboratory values monitoring, documentation variances, and need for further sepsis education. Nursing feedback regarding the ease and use of the sepsis trigger program was submitted to the manufacturer. Data analysis also found that nurses in the unit supported by a CNS had better compliance with using the monitoring program, and an increase in sepsis bundle compliance, than did the unit without the support of a CNS. Learning opportunities provided during the CNS residency included clinical inquiry, implementation of innovative interventions, evaluation of technology, influencing change, and systems thinking.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
26-Oct-2011
Citation:
2010 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 19(3), e15-e28. doi:10.4037/ajcc2010866
Conference Date:
2010
Conference Name:
National Teaching Institute and Critical Care Exposition
Conference Host:
American Association of Critical-Care Nurses
Conference Location:
Washington, D.C., USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleImplementing research into a CNS residency: The impact of computerized triggers on early identification of sepsis.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorBustraan, Lynne M.en_GB
dc.author.detailsLynne M. Bustraan, RN,MS,MSN,CCRN, Florida Hospital, Orlando, Florida, USA, email: lbustraan@bellsouth.neten_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/156962-
dc.description.abstractPURPOSE: Sepsis is life-threatening complication of critical illness. The purpose of this project was to evaluate a bedside monitoring application for its ability to detect sepsis. Because successful implementation of sepsis bundles hinge largely on early detection, a need for accurate and timely evaluation of the signs and symptoms of sepsis was needed. The project was begun during a CNS residency to learn essential competencies of CNS practice. DESCRIPTION: As an opportunity to develop CNS skills related to conduct of clinical research was afforded during the final residency in the CNS program. Because early recognition of sepsis is essential to increasing survival rates, a project was undertaken to evaluate a patient monitoring application to alert the nurse to potential signs and symptoms of sepsis (Protocol Watch, Philips Medical Systems, Andover, MA). During the CNS residency, implementation of this project included IRB approval, implementation of the monitoring system, staff education, data collection, and analysis. This project was conducted at 2 comparable facilities within a multihospital system. Data were collected before implementation to assess characteristics of patients with sepsis, time to recognition, and adherence to treatment recommendations. Implementation occurred over a 1-week period with education and training support from the vendor. Following implementation, data were collected to determine what nurses did when the sepsis trigger alarmed and to assess accurate recognition of sepsis and implementation of treatment protocols. EVALUATION/OUTCOMES:During project implementation, several key findings related to CNS practice were noted: lack of routine laboratory values monitoring, documentation variances, and need for further sepsis education. Nursing feedback regarding the ease and use of the sepsis trigger program was submitted to the manufacturer. Data analysis also found that nurses in the unit supported by a CNS had better compliance with using the monitoring program, and an increase in sepsis bundle compliance, than did the unit without the support of a CNS. Learning opportunities provided during the CNS residency included clinical inquiry, implementation of innovative interventions, evaluation of technology, influencing change, and systems thinking.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:17:53Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-26en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:17:53Z-
dc.identifier.citation2010 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 19(3), e15-e28. doi:10.4037/ajcc2010866en_GB
dc.conference.date2010en_GB
dc.conference.nameNational Teaching Institute and Critical Care Expositionen_GB
dc.conference.hostAmerican Association of Critical-Care Nursesen_GB
dc.conference.locationWashington, D.C., USAen_GB
dc.identifier.citation2010 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 19(3), e15-e28. doi:10.4037/ajcc2010866en_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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