2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/156963
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Improved Patient/Family Satisfaction After Implementation of Family Rounds
Author(s):
Byrne, Linda A.
Author Details:
Linda A. Byrne, RN,BSN, R. Adams Cowley Shock Trauma Center, University of Maryland Medical Center, Baltimore, Maryland, USA, email: lindabyrnezy@aol.com
Abstract:
PURPOSE: A primary need of families of critically ill patients is to receive information about their loved one. Evidence-based guidelines recommend shared decision making and regular information dissemination between the patient, family, and caregivers. The critical care unitÆs nursing leadership and medical director implemented daily "family rounds" with the goal to improve patient/ family satisfaction scores related to communication and involvement in care decisions. DESCRIPTION: Review of patient/family satisfaction data for the critical care unit from fiscal year 2006 (FY 06) revealed low scores regarding physician availability, explanation of treatments, and sharing in decision making. A review of the literature suggested that family rounds could improve communication and the relationship between the health care providers and families. To improve low patient/family satisfaction scores found on the unit the nursing leaders unit and the medical director initiated Family Rounds. These rounds consist of the critical care attending and a senior nurse visiting each patient and/or family at the patientÆs bedside every weekday between 4 PM and 5 PM. The visit lasts approximately 5 minutes per patient. The purpose of the visit is to answer any questions, give a brief clinical update and solicit patient/family input for care decisions. EVALUATION/OUTCOMES:Patient/family satisfaction scores for FY 07 improved for the 6 questions on the survey regarding communication, physician availability, and involvement in decision making. The scores for 5 of the 6 questions increased even more from FY 07 to FY 08. The average score of these 6 questions (on a 0û5 Likert scale) increased from 4.4 in FY 06 to 4.6 in FY 07 and up to 4.8 in FY 08. The patients and families quickly understood the routine and were prepared with questions for the rounding physician and nurse. Family Rounds, which take 1 hour or less per day, increased patient family satisfaction for 2 consecutive years.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
26-Oct-2011
Citation:
2010 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 19(3), e15-e28. doi:10.4037/ajcc2010866
Conference Date:
2010
Conference Name:
National Teaching Institute and Critical Care Exposition
Conference Host:
American Association of Critical-Care Nurses
Conference Location:
Washington, D.C., USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleImproved Patient/Family Satisfaction After Implementation of Family Roundsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorByrne, Linda A.en_GB
dc.author.detailsLinda A. Byrne, RN,BSN, R. Adams Cowley Shock Trauma Center, University of Maryland Medical Center, Baltimore, Maryland, USA, email: lindabyrnezy@aol.comen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/156963-
dc.description.abstractPURPOSE: A primary need of families of critically ill patients is to receive information about their loved one. Evidence-based guidelines recommend shared decision making and regular information dissemination between the patient, family, and caregivers. The critical care unitÆs nursing leadership and medical director implemented daily "family rounds" with the goal to improve patient/ family satisfaction scores related to communication and involvement in care decisions. DESCRIPTION: Review of patient/family satisfaction data for the critical care unit from fiscal year 2006 (FY 06) revealed low scores regarding physician availability, explanation of treatments, and sharing in decision making. A review of the literature suggested that family rounds could improve communication and the relationship between the health care providers and families. To improve low patient/family satisfaction scores found on the unit the nursing leaders unit and the medical director initiated Family Rounds. These rounds consist of the critical care attending and a senior nurse visiting each patient and/or family at the patientÆs bedside every weekday between 4 PM and 5 PM. The visit lasts approximately 5 minutes per patient. The purpose of the visit is to answer any questions, give a brief clinical update and solicit patient/family input for care decisions. EVALUATION/OUTCOMES:Patient/family satisfaction scores for FY 07 improved for the 6 questions on the survey regarding communication, physician availability, and involvement in decision making. The scores for 5 of the 6 questions increased even more from FY 07 to FY 08. The average score of these 6 questions (on a 0û5 Likert scale) increased from 4.4 in FY 06 to 4.6 in FY 07 and up to 4.8 in FY 08. The patients and families quickly understood the routine and were prepared with questions for the rounding physician and nurse. Family Rounds, which take 1 hour or less per day, increased patient family satisfaction for 2 consecutive years.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:17:57Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-26en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:17:57Z-
dc.identifier.citation2010 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 19(3), e15-e28. doi:10.4037/ajcc2010866en_GB
dc.conference.date2010en_GB
dc.conference.nameNational Teaching Institute and Critical Care Expositionen_GB
dc.conference.hostAmerican Association of Critical-Care Nursesen_GB
dc.conference.locationWashington, D.C., USAen_GB
dc.identifier.citation2010 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 19(3), e15-e28. doi:10.4037/ajcc2010866en_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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