2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/156964
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Amazing Hospital Race
Author(s):
Callicutt, Jr., Jimmy Dale; Nichols, Audrey; Smith, Lesa; Stille, Peggy; Trammel, Mitzie; Bowen, Tamara; Jones, Heather; Takahashi, Holli; Gordon, Gina
Author Details:
Jimmy Dale Callicutt, Jr., RN,BA,CCRN,RN-BC,CVRN, Forsyth Medical Center, Winston-Salem, North Carolina, USA, email: jdcallicutt@novanthealth.org; Audrey Nichols; Lesa Smith; Peggy Stille; Mitzie Trammel; Tamara Bowen; Heather Jones; Holli Takahashi; Gina Gordon
Abstract:
PURPOSE: New graduate nurses orienting to our 975-bed medical center were often frustrated with finding their way around the complex physical design of our hospital. In an effort to familiarize new critical care nurses to various departments throughout the facility, critical care educators designed an innovative class that would quickly acclimate these new employees to areas such as nursing administration, various ICUs, radiology, and pharmacy. DESCRIPTION: The Amazing Hospital Race (AHR) allows for a fun, interactive introduction to various departments at our facility as part of the critical care curriculum. Participants are divided into teams of 5 - 6 people. Each team is given a different patient scenario and a different starting point. One team may start in a critical care unit whereas another team may start in a procedural department. The teams rotate from station to station along the care continuum. At each station, the team reviews department functions and scope of care, and answers questions related to their patient scenario. After the case is discussed, the team receives another clue that takes them to yet another department and a continuation of the patient scenario. Some areas have an instructor to review materials and some areas have educational boards with questions and answers. All teams are exposed to approximately 12 departments that they will interact with as critical care nurses. EVALUATION/OUTCOMES: Evaluation of this teaching innovation has been overwhelmingly positive. Over 90% of the participants rated the AHR as an effective strategy for orienting them to the physical layout of our large medical center. Over half of the teams got lost during their learning quest, but ultimately benefited from their mistake by learning other routes around the hospital. Anecdotally, the educators noted that the new nurses were beginning to critically think through complex patient scenarios and function more competently in teams. The AHR has been an effective, fun strategy to orient new nurses to unfamiliar surroundings during a controlled scenario that teaches much more than a routine hospital tour.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
26-Oct-2011
Citation:
2010 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 19(3), e15-e28. doi:10.4037/ajcc2010866
Conference Date:
2010
Conference Name:
National Teaching Institute and Critical Care Exposition
Conference Host:
American Association of Critical-Care Nurses
Conference Location:
Washington, D.C., USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Amazing Hospital Raceen_GB
dc.contributor.authorCallicutt, Jr., Jimmy Daleen_GB
dc.contributor.authorNichols, Audreyen_GB
dc.contributor.authorSmith, Lesaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorStille, Peggyen_GB
dc.contributor.authorTrammel, Mitzieen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBowen, Tamaraen_GB
dc.contributor.authorJones, Heatheren_GB
dc.contributor.authorTakahashi, Hollien_GB
dc.contributor.authorGordon, Ginaen_GB
dc.author.detailsJimmy Dale Callicutt, Jr., RN,BA,CCRN,RN-BC,CVRN, Forsyth Medical Center, Winston-Salem, North Carolina, USA, email: jdcallicutt@novanthealth.org; Audrey Nichols; Lesa Smith; Peggy Stille; Mitzie Trammel; Tamara Bowen; Heather Jones; Holli Takahashi; Gina Gordonen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/156964-
dc.description.abstractPURPOSE: New graduate nurses orienting to our 975-bed medical center were often frustrated with finding their way around the complex physical design of our hospital. In an effort to familiarize new critical care nurses to various departments throughout the facility, critical care educators designed an innovative class that would quickly acclimate these new employees to areas such as nursing administration, various ICUs, radiology, and pharmacy. DESCRIPTION: The Amazing Hospital Race (AHR) allows for a fun, interactive introduction to various departments at our facility as part of the critical care curriculum. Participants are divided into teams of 5 - 6 people. Each team is given a different patient scenario and a different starting point. One team may start in a critical care unit whereas another team may start in a procedural department. The teams rotate from station to station along the care continuum. At each station, the team reviews department functions and scope of care, and answers questions related to their patient scenario. After the case is discussed, the team receives another clue that takes them to yet another department and a continuation of the patient scenario. Some areas have an instructor to review materials and some areas have educational boards with questions and answers. All teams are exposed to approximately 12 departments that they will interact with as critical care nurses. EVALUATION/OUTCOMES: Evaluation of this teaching innovation has been overwhelmingly positive. Over 90% of the participants rated the AHR as an effective strategy for orienting them to the physical layout of our large medical center. Over half of the teams got lost during their learning quest, but ultimately benefited from their mistake by learning other routes around the hospital. Anecdotally, the educators noted that the new nurses were beginning to critically think through complex patient scenarios and function more competently in teams. The AHR has been an effective, fun strategy to orient new nurses to unfamiliar surroundings during a controlled scenario that teaches much more than a routine hospital tour.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:18:00Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-26en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:18:00Z-
dc.identifier.citation2010 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 19(3), e15-e28. doi:10.4037/ajcc2010866en_GB
dc.conference.date2010en_GB
dc.conference.nameNational Teaching Institute and Critical Care Expositionen_GB
dc.conference.hostAmerican Association of Critical-Care Nursesen_GB
dc.conference.locationWashington, D.C., USAen_GB
dc.identifier.citation2010 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 19(3), e15-e28. doi:10.4037/ajcc2010866en_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.