2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/156965
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Evaluating a Fall Prevention Program Tailored for a Telemetry Unit
Author(s):
Catalano, Lori A.
Author Details:
Lori A. Catalano, RN,BSN, The Christ Hospital, Cincinnati, Ohio, USA, email: lori.catalano@yahoo.com
Abstract:
PURPOSE: Much research has been conducted to examine ways to reduce falls and supports a multi-faceted approach consisting of a "fall bundle" of interventions specific to unit needs. On our unit, the old bundle included signs placed on the patient charts and on the doors, but staff expressed concern that the signs were small and often overlooked. The purpose of this study was to determine if a 4-fold increase in sign size and more specificity in signage would reduce the incidence of falls. DESCRIPTION: The IRB-approved quasi-experimental study compared historical control data to postimplementation data of the new fall bundle with improved signage. The bundle included staff education, red 12-inch "Call, DonÆt Fall" signs placed at the end of the bed for at-risk patients, and larger signs indicating fall risk placed at the entry to the patient room. The risk stratification included (1) red stop sign for those on complete bedrest due to physical limitations or recent procedures, or requiring complete assistance due to confusion and unsteadiness; (2) yellow triangle for those using assistive devices, needing assistance with ambulation, or recovering from sedation; and (3) green plus sign for alert and oriented patients with steady gaits who needed no assistance. The red signs were further modified to indicate whether the patient was on procedural bedrest or required complete care. The yellow signs were further modified to indicate the level of assistance needed by the patient, ranging from stand-by assistance to a 2-person assist. The staff evaluated the patients every shift and updated the patientsÆ signs. Input from physical and occupational therapy was taken into account in determining the proper level of assistance. EVALUATION/OUTCOMES:The number of falls per patient days was obtained for January and February 2008 as historical controls. For these 2 months, the number of falls was 6 falls for 1266 patient days, yielding a fall rate of 4.74 per 1000 patient days preimplementation. The new bundle was implemented in January 2009. During the postintervention period, the number of falls was 5 falls for 1443 patient days, yielding a fall rate of 3.47, a 27% reduction. Anecdotal comments from staff reflected satisfaction not only in decreasing the fall rate, but also in knowing the patientsÆ ambulation status immediately upon seeing the signs. With further use of the fall prevention program, the fall rate eventually decreased by almost 75%.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
26-Oct-2011
Citation:
2010 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 19(3), e15-e28. doi:10.4037/ajcc2010866
Conference Date:
2010
Conference Name:
National Teaching Institute and Critical Care Exposition
Conference Host:
American Association of Critical-Care Nurses
Conference Location:
Washington, D.C., USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEvaluating a Fall Prevention Program Tailored for a Telemetry Uniten_GB
dc.contributor.authorCatalano, Lori A.en_GB
dc.author.detailsLori A. Catalano, RN,BSN, The Christ Hospital, Cincinnati, Ohio, USA, email: lori.catalano@yahoo.comen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/156965-
dc.description.abstractPURPOSE: Much research has been conducted to examine ways to reduce falls and supports a multi-faceted approach consisting of a "fall bundle" of interventions specific to unit needs. On our unit, the old bundle included signs placed on the patient charts and on the doors, but staff expressed concern that the signs were small and often overlooked. The purpose of this study was to determine if a 4-fold increase in sign size and more specificity in signage would reduce the incidence of falls. DESCRIPTION: The IRB-approved quasi-experimental study compared historical control data to postimplementation data of the new fall bundle with improved signage. The bundle included staff education, red 12-inch "Call, DonÆt Fall" signs placed at the end of the bed for at-risk patients, and larger signs indicating fall risk placed at the entry to the patient room. The risk stratification included (1) red stop sign for those on complete bedrest due to physical limitations or recent procedures, or requiring complete assistance due to confusion and unsteadiness; (2) yellow triangle for those using assistive devices, needing assistance with ambulation, or recovering from sedation; and (3) green plus sign for alert and oriented patients with steady gaits who needed no assistance. The red signs were further modified to indicate whether the patient was on procedural bedrest or required complete care. The yellow signs were further modified to indicate the level of assistance needed by the patient, ranging from stand-by assistance to a 2-person assist. The staff evaluated the patients every shift and updated the patientsÆ signs. Input from physical and occupational therapy was taken into account in determining the proper level of assistance. EVALUATION/OUTCOMES:The number of falls per patient days was obtained for January and February 2008 as historical controls. For these 2 months, the number of falls was 6 falls for 1266 patient days, yielding a fall rate of 4.74 per 1000 patient days preimplementation. The new bundle was implemented in January 2009. During the postintervention period, the number of falls was 5 falls for 1443 patient days, yielding a fall rate of 3.47, a 27% reduction. Anecdotal comments from staff reflected satisfaction not only in decreasing the fall rate, but also in knowing the patientsÆ ambulation status immediately upon seeing the signs. With further use of the fall prevention program, the fall rate eventually decreased by almost 75%.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:18:03Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-26en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:18:03Z-
dc.identifier.citation2010 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 19(3), e15-e28. doi:10.4037/ajcc2010866en_GB
dc.conference.date2010en_GB
dc.conference.nameNational Teaching Institute and Critical Care Expositionen_GB
dc.conference.hostAmerican Association of Critical-Care Nursesen_GB
dc.conference.locationWashington, D.C., USAen_GB
dc.identifier.citation2010 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 19(3), e15-e28. doi:10.4037/ajcc2010866en_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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