Simulation training in emergency situation for the new graduate critical care nurses: A randomized controlled study

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/156967
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Simulation training in emergency situation for the new graduate critical care nurses: A randomized controlled study
Author(s):
Chang, Sun Ju; Kwon, Heui Kyeong; Kwon, Young Ok; Kwon, Eunok
Author Details:
Sun Ju Chang, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul, Korea, email: baimau98@snu.ac.kr; Heui Kyeong Kwon; Young Ok Kwon; Eunok Kwon
Abstract:
POSTER PURPOSE: To examine how simulation training for new graduate critical care nurses on endotracheal intubation, temporary pacemaker, transcutaneous pacemaker, pulseless ventricular tachycardia, and ventricular fibrillation, which occur frequently in intensive care units (ICUs), affects their knowledge, self-efficacy, and performance ability to deal with the emergency situation. BACKGROUND/SIGNIFICANCE:Emergency situations such as the need for cardiopulmonary resuscitation in ICUs are one of the most unexpected events that need fast and effective coping by critical care nurses. But new-graduate critical care nurses feel uncomfortable when they face such situations. Training of new-graduate nurses during orientation is needed to increase their knowledge of the emergency situation and their skills in dealing with them. Simulation training is considered more effective than traditional training in terms of increasing knowledge in a clinical setting. METHOD: Simulation training consists of scenarios of the role of 3 critical care nurses (1 assigned nurse and 2 assisted nurses) in 5 different emergency situations. Forty new-graduate critical care nurses were randomly assigned to either interventions or a control group. Slide presentation and simulation training were given to the intervention group, whereas only slide presentation was given to the control group. The knowledge, self-efficacy, and performance ability before and after the training were obtained. A repeated-measure analysis of variance is used to test the difference between variables. RESULTS: Of the 40 randomized new-graduate critical care nurses, 20 were randomized to intervention and 20 to a control group. All nurses were female, and 77.5% of them had a bachelorÆs degree. No significant differences were found between groups at study admission for any personal characteristics and scores of variables. Significant increases were found in knowledge scores (mean [SD], 23.55 [2.41] for interventions vs 22.30 [2.51] for control, P=.012), and performance ability scores (10.30 [1.74] for interventions vs 4.50 [4.03] for control, P<.001). However, no significant difference between groups was found in self-efficacy (P=.08). CONCLUSIONS: Simulation training for new-graduate critical care nurses is useful to increase their knowledge and performance ability in emergency situations in the ICU. Therefore, providing such training to critical care nurses during orientation would improve the quality of critical care nursing and help new-graduate nurses to adapt.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
26-Oct-2011
Citation:
2010 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 19(3), e15-e28. doi:10.4037/ajcc2010866
Conference Date:
2010
Conference Name:
National Teaching Institute and Critical Care Exposition
Conference Host:
American Association of Critical-Care Nurses
Conference Location:
Washington, D.C., USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSimulation training in emergency situation for the new graduate critical care nurses: A randomized controlled studyen_GB
dc.contributor.authorChang, Sun Juen_GB
dc.contributor.authorKwon, Heui Kyeongen_GB
dc.contributor.authorKwon, Young Oken_GB
dc.contributor.authorKwon, Eunoken_GB
dc.author.detailsSun Ju Chang, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul, Korea, email: baimau98@snu.ac.kr; Heui Kyeong Kwon; Young Ok Kwon; Eunok Kwonen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/156967-
dc.description.abstractPOSTER PURPOSE: To examine how simulation training for new graduate critical care nurses on endotracheal intubation, temporary pacemaker, transcutaneous pacemaker, pulseless ventricular tachycardia, and ventricular fibrillation, which occur frequently in intensive care units (ICUs), affects their knowledge, self-efficacy, and performance ability to deal with the emergency situation. BACKGROUND/SIGNIFICANCE:Emergency situations such as the need for cardiopulmonary resuscitation in ICUs are one of the most unexpected events that need fast and effective coping by critical care nurses. But new-graduate critical care nurses feel uncomfortable when they face such situations. Training of new-graduate nurses during orientation is needed to increase their knowledge of the emergency situation and their skills in dealing with them. Simulation training is considered more effective than traditional training in terms of increasing knowledge in a clinical setting. METHOD: Simulation training consists of scenarios of the role of 3 critical care nurses (1 assigned nurse and 2 assisted nurses) in 5 different emergency situations. Forty new-graduate critical care nurses were randomly assigned to either interventions or a control group. Slide presentation and simulation training were given to the intervention group, whereas only slide presentation was given to the control group. The knowledge, self-efficacy, and performance ability before and after the training were obtained. A repeated-measure analysis of variance is used to test the difference between variables. RESULTS: Of the 40 randomized new-graduate critical care nurses, 20 were randomized to intervention and 20 to a control group. All nurses were female, and 77.5% of them had a bachelor&AElig;s degree. No significant differences were found between groups at study admission for any personal characteristics and scores of variables. Significant increases were found in knowledge scores (mean [SD], 23.55 [2.41] for interventions vs 22.30 [2.51] for control, P=.012), and performance ability scores (10.30 [1.74] for interventions vs 4.50 [4.03] for control, P<.001). However, no significant difference between groups was found in self-efficacy (P=.08). CONCLUSIONS: Simulation training for new-graduate critical care nurses is useful to increase their knowledge and performance ability in emergency situations in the ICU. Therefore, providing such training to critical care nurses during orientation would improve the quality of critical care nursing and help new-graduate nurses to adapt.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:18:09Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-26en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:18:09Z-
dc.identifier.citation2010 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 19(3), e15-e28. doi:10.4037/ajcc2010866en_GB
dc.conference.date2010en_GB
dc.conference.nameNational Teaching Institute and Critical Care Expositionen_GB
dc.conference.hostAmerican Association of Critical-Care Nursesen_GB
dc.conference.locationWashington, D.C., USAen_GB
dc.identifier.citation2010 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 19(3), e15-e28. doi:10.4037/ajcc2010866en_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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