2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/156968
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Rapid Response Team: Kick It Up A Notch: From Reactive To Proactive
Author(s):
Christiansen, Nancy E.
Author Details:
Nancy E. Christiansen, RN,BSN,CCRN, St. Joseph Hospital, Orange, California, USA, email: nancy.christiansen@stjoe.org
Abstract:
PURPOSE: In September 2008 we changed our rapid response team model from a reactive model to a pro-active model with a dedicated rapid response RN available 24 hours a day. The proactive model allows the rapid response RN to round on identified high-risk patients in the medical/surgical (M/S) areas, to be available to RNs throughout the hospital for consultation and education, and to respond to emergencies in the M/S areas as they occur. DESCRIPTION: Our rapid response team, called MET (medical emergency team), began in May 2004 with the goal of responding to patientsÆ threatened clinical deterioration in the M/S areas and preventing code blue events outside of critical care. Our team model was reactive and consisted of the critical care charge RN and a respiratory therapist responding to emergencies as called. We saw decreases in code blue events as the MET calls increased but we continued to have a significant number of code blue events outside of critical care. In September 2008 we changed to a pro-active model and budgeted for a dedicated MET RN providing 24-hour coverage for the hospital. We educated staff and physicians throughout the hospital on the new role of the MET RN and when to call. We developed tools for identifying high-risk patients. We also developed a database for the MET RN to document patient visits. The database is a rich tool for tracking and measuring outcomes. EVALUATION/OUTCOMES:In the first 3 quarters after implementation of the MET RN proactive model we saw an 18% decrease in the percentage of code blue events outside of critical care (from 44% to 26%). We also saw a 1.8 % decrease in the overall rate of code blue events per 1000 discharges (from 7.5 % to 5.7%). The MET RNs are proactively rounding on high-risk patients identified through innovative tools. The MET RNs are available to RNs in the M/S areas for consultation and education as well as responding to emergencies throughout the hospital. The proactive model has made a significant difference toward decreasing code blue events outside of critical care.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
26-Oct-2011
Citation:
2010 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 19(3), e15-e28. doi:10.4037/ajcc2010866
Conference Date:
2010
Conference Name:
National Teaching Institute and Critical Care Exposition
Conference Host:
American Association of Critical-Care Nurses
Conference Location:
Washington, D.C., USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleRapid Response Team: Kick It Up A Notch: From Reactive To Proactiveen_GB
dc.contributor.authorChristiansen, Nancy E.en_GB
dc.author.detailsNancy E. Christiansen, RN,BSN,CCRN, St. Joseph Hospital, Orange, California, USA, email: nancy.christiansen@stjoe.orgen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/156968-
dc.description.abstractPURPOSE: In September 2008 we changed our rapid response team model from a reactive model to a pro-active model with a dedicated rapid response RN available 24 hours a day. The proactive model allows the rapid response RN to round on identified high-risk patients in the medical/surgical (M/S) areas, to be available to RNs throughout the hospital for consultation and education, and to respond to emergencies in the M/S areas as they occur. DESCRIPTION: Our rapid response team, called MET (medical emergency team), began in May 2004 with the goal of responding to patientsÆ threatened clinical deterioration in the M/S areas and preventing code blue events outside of critical care. Our team model was reactive and consisted of the critical care charge RN and a respiratory therapist responding to emergencies as called. We saw decreases in code blue events as the MET calls increased but we continued to have a significant number of code blue events outside of critical care. In September 2008 we changed to a pro-active model and budgeted for a dedicated MET RN providing 24-hour coverage for the hospital. We educated staff and physicians throughout the hospital on the new role of the MET RN and when to call. We developed tools for identifying high-risk patients. We also developed a database for the MET RN to document patient visits. The database is a rich tool for tracking and measuring outcomes. EVALUATION/OUTCOMES:In the first 3 quarters after implementation of the MET RN proactive model we saw an 18% decrease in the percentage of code blue events outside of critical care (from 44% to 26%). We also saw a 1.8 % decrease in the overall rate of code blue events per 1000 discharges (from 7.5 % to 5.7%). The MET RNs are proactively rounding on high-risk patients identified through innovative tools. The MET RNs are available to RNs in the M/S areas for consultation and education as well as responding to emergencies throughout the hospital. The proactive model has made a significant difference toward decreasing code blue events outside of critical care.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:18:13Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-26en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:18:13Z-
dc.identifier.citation2010 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 19(3), e15-e28. doi:10.4037/ajcc2010866en_GB
dc.conference.date2010en_GB
dc.conference.nameNational Teaching Institute and Critical Care Expositionen_GB
dc.conference.hostAmerican Association of Critical-Care Nursesen_GB
dc.conference.locationWashington, D.C., USAen_GB
dc.identifier.citation2010 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 19(3), e15-e28. doi:10.4037/ajcc2010866en_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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