2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/156973
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
College Student Organ Donation Study (CO-ORGAN): Phase I Results
Author(s):
Disena, Shannon; Granger, Bradi
Author Details:
Shannon Disena,RN, PCCN, Duke Hospital, Duke University Health System, Bahama, North Carolina, USA, email: disena4@gmail.com; Bradi Granger
Abstract:
POSTER PURPOSE: In our state, registration to be a designated organ donor is low. The CO-ORGAN program was an educational intervention developed by transplant nurses to increase awareness of organ donation needs, disperse common myths associated with donation, and increase the number of registered organ donors in our state. The study focused on students 18 to 25 years old, a target population whose ability to substantially increase the donor pool is well documented. BACKGROUND/SIGNIFICANCE:Currently, 2876 people in North Carolina are awaiting organs, many dying unnecessarily due to the shortage. Factors related to low donor registration include cultural beliefs, sex, age, knowledge, and unwillingness to discuss donation with family. Efforts to develop interventions have focused on educational strategies; however, these strategies have been limited and unsuccessful in increasing organ availability. This study expands on these strategies by offering on-site registration and a focus on family communication. METHOD: Transplant nurses and their team created an intervention designed to address factors known to influence rates of donor registration, focusing on communication with family regarding wishes. Students at 5 local college campuses watched a video of nurses, physicians, and family members caring for transplant candidates. They participated in group discussions with their peers and had the opportunity to ask questions of nurse professionals who regularly care for transplant patients, both before and after organ receipt. Students then had an opportunity to sign donor cards. In addition, they were asked to complete a brief questionnaire regarding knowledge and family communication. RESULTS: Of 403 participants in phase I, 292 (72%) were "unsure" or "very unsure" of the recommended steps to becoming a donor. In spite of this, the majority of students were designated organ donors. Of those who were "unsure," most were "very willing" to talk with family members about becoming an organ donor, but they were "unsure about how" to discuss their decision. When asked "Do you feel students could play an important role in teaching others?" most (n = 381; 95%) responded "strongly agree," yet were uncomfortable talking to others about donation. These findings suggest that students feel strongly about the importance of donor registration, yet lack confidence to communicate the commitment. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings show that a majority of college students are committed to being organ donors, but most have not communicated these wishes to family members. One reason for low rates of communication was lack of confidence in discussing the process of donation. In addition, most students were uninformed regarding the severity of the organ donor shortage and the valuable contribution they could make as individuals to improve community awareness through conversations with family and peers.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
26-Oct-2011
Citation:
2010 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 19(3), e15-e28. doi:10.4037/ajcc2010866
Conference Date:
2010
Conference Name:
National Teaching Institute and Critical Care Exposition
Conference Host:
American Association of Critical-Care Nurses
Conference Location:
Washington, D.C., USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCollege Student Organ Donation Study (CO-ORGAN): Phase I Resultsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorDisena, Shannonen_GB
dc.contributor.authorGranger, Bradien_GB
dc.author.detailsShannon Disena,RN, PCCN, Duke Hospital, Duke University Health System, Bahama, North Carolina, USA, email: disena4@gmail.com; Bradi Grangeren_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/156973-
dc.description.abstractPOSTER PURPOSE: In our state, registration to be a designated organ donor is low. The CO-ORGAN program was an educational intervention developed by transplant nurses to increase awareness of organ donation needs, disperse common myths associated with donation, and increase the number of registered organ donors in our state. The study focused on students 18 to 25 years old, a target population whose ability to substantially increase the donor pool is well documented. BACKGROUND/SIGNIFICANCE:Currently, 2876 people in North Carolina are awaiting organs, many dying unnecessarily due to the shortage. Factors related to low donor registration include cultural beliefs, sex, age, knowledge, and unwillingness to discuss donation with family. Efforts to develop interventions have focused on educational strategies; however, these strategies have been limited and unsuccessful in increasing organ availability. This study expands on these strategies by offering on-site registration and a focus on family communication. METHOD: Transplant nurses and their team created an intervention designed to address factors known to influence rates of donor registration, focusing on communication with family regarding wishes. Students at 5 local college campuses watched a video of nurses, physicians, and family members caring for transplant candidates. They participated in group discussions with their peers and had the opportunity to ask questions of nurse professionals who regularly care for transplant patients, both before and after organ receipt. Students then had an opportunity to sign donor cards. In addition, they were asked to complete a brief questionnaire regarding knowledge and family communication. RESULTS: Of 403 participants in phase I, 292 (72%) were "unsure" or "very unsure" of the recommended steps to becoming a donor. In spite of this, the majority of students were designated organ donors. Of those who were "unsure," most were "very willing" to talk with family members about becoming an organ donor, but they were "unsure about how" to discuss their decision. When asked "Do you feel students could play an important role in teaching others?" most (n = 381; 95%) responded "strongly agree," yet were uncomfortable talking to others about donation. These findings suggest that students feel strongly about the importance of donor registration, yet lack confidence to communicate the commitment. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings show that a majority of college students are committed to being organ donors, but most have not communicated these wishes to family members. One reason for low rates of communication was lack of confidence in discussing the process of donation. In addition, most students were uninformed regarding the severity of the organ donor shortage and the valuable contribution they could make as individuals to improve community awareness through conversations with family and peers.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:18:30Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-26en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:18:30Z-
dc.identifier.citation2010 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 19(3), e15-e28. doi:10.4037/ajcc2010866en_GB
dc.conference.date2010en_GB
dc.conference.nameNational Teaching Institute and Critical Care Expositionen_GB
dc.conference.hostAmerican Association of Critical-Care Nursesen_GB
dc.conference.locationWashington, D.C., USAen_GB
dc.identifier.citation2010 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 19(3), e15-e28. doi:10.4037/ajcc2010866en_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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