7.00
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/156976
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Watson Room: Caring of the Self
Author(s):
Espejo, Jocelyn E.
Author Details:
Jocelyn E. Espejo, RN,BSN,CCRN-CMC,RN-C, St. Joseph's Regional & Medical Center, Paterson, New Jersey, USA, email: jedfmf@yahoo.com
Abstract:
PURPOSE: Allowing nurses to center on the self and engage in refocusing, destressing, and rejuvenating by using aesthetic enhancement with complementary and alternative therapies in the Watson Room will in turn create and sustain a caring and healing environment for the patients, families, and the staff. DESCRIPTION: The Watson Room is named after the nursing theorist, Jean Watson. This is a quiet space created for nurses to achieve personal satisfaction in their work. The Watson Room is a byproduct of the Shared Governance Council working on the 14 Forces of Magnetism, Watson Caring Theory, relationship-based care, and healthy work environment to achieve our vision for excellence in patient care. Believing in our commitment to a culture of excellence, the Director Surgical Trauma Services relinquished an office for nurses. A staff nurse from the medical ICU engaged staff nurses, maintenance, patient care associates, nurse managers, directors of nursing, and the chief nurse officer to help with the transformation of the room. Nurses use the room 24/7-before, during or after their shift. Nurses are greeted with the scent of lavender, tranquil music, gently flowing waterfalls, healing tree of stones, Buddha board, and soft drapery gathered toward the massage seat. Representing the 10 caritas of Watson is the Caring Mosaic artwork made of medicine caps and materials nurses use every day. These aesthetic enhancement and harmonious interplay of complementary and alternative therapies for nurses gave an instant sense of relaxation. EVALUATION/OUTCOMES:The effects of personal satisfaction derived from the Watson Room on the Self can be echoed from the positive comments of nursing staff while they are in the Watson Room, on their units, and in patientÆs rooms. Good patient care outcomes results from destressing and refocusing. Caring and healing for the patient, families, and the staff in a healthy work environment takes place when the nurses are nurtured first.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
26-Oct-2011
Citation:
2010 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 19(3), e15-e28. doi:10.4037/ajcc2010866
Conference Date:
2010
Conference Name:
National Teaching Institute and Critical Care Exposition
Conference Host:
American Association of Critical-Care Nurses
Conference Location:
Washington, D.C., USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleWatson Room: Caring of the Selfen_GB
dc.contributor.authorEspejo, Jocelyn E.en_GB
dc.author.detailsJocelyn E. Espejo, RN,BSN,CCRN-CMC,RN-C, St. Joseph's Regional & Medical Center, Paterson, New Jersey, USA, email: jedfmf@yahoo.comen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/156976-
dc.description.abstractPURPOSE: Allowing nurses to center on the self and engage in refocusing, destressing, and rejuvenating by using aesthetic enhancement with complementary and alternative therapies in the Watson Room will in turn create and sustain a caring and healing environment for the patients, families, and the staff. DESCRIPTION: The Watson Room is named after the nursing theorist, Jean Watson. This is a quiet space created for nurses to achieve personal satisfaction in their work. The Watson Room is a byproduct of the Shared Governance Council working on the 14 Forces of Magnetism, Watson Caring Theory, relationship-based care, and healthy work environment to achieve our vision for excellence in patient care. Believing in our commitment to a culture of excellence, the Director Surgical Trauma Services relinquished an office for nurses. A staff nurse from the medical ICU engaged staff nurses, maintenance, patient care associates, nurse managers, directors of nursing, and the chief nurse officer to help with the transformation of the room. Nurses use the room 24/7-before, during or after their shift. Nurses are greeted with the scent of lavender, tranquil music, gently flowing waterfalls, healing tree of stones, Buddha board, and soft drapery gathered toward the massage seat. Representing the 10 caritas of Watson is the Caring Mosaic artwork made of medicine caps and materials nurses use every day. These aesthetic enhancement and harmonious interplay of complementary and alternative therapies for nurses gave an instant sense of relaxation. EVALUATION/OUTCOMES:The effects of personal satisfaction derived from the Watson Room on the Self can be echoed from the positive comments of nursing staff while they are in the Watson Room, on their units, and in patientÆs rooms. Good patient care outcomes results from destressing and refocusing. Caring and healing for the patient, families, and the staff in a healthy work environment takes place when the nurses are nurtured first.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:18:39Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-26en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:18:39Z-
dc.identifier.citation2010 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 19(3), e15-e28. doi:10.4037/ajcc2010866en_GB
dc.conference.date2010en_GB
dc.conference.nameNational Teaching Institute and Critical Care Expositionen_GB
dc.conference.hostAmerican Association of Critical-Care Nursesen_GB
dc.conference.locationWashington, D.C., USAen_GB
dc.identifier.citation2010 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 19(3), e15-e28. doi:10.4037/ajcc2010866en_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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