Pain Assessment in Non-Verbal Critically Ill Adults Using the Behavioral Pain Scale: Part Two

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/156978
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Pain Assessment in Non-Verbal Critically Ill Adults Using the Behavioral Pain Scale: Part Two
Author(s):
Fetherman, Brandee A.
Author Details:
Brandee A. Fetherman, MSN, RN, CCRN, TNCC, Morristown Memorial Hospital, Morristown, New Jersey, USA, email: Brandee.Fetherman@ahsys.org
Abstract:
POSTER PURPOSE: Pain is a stressor for critically ill patients. In general, pain is recognized as a subjective and multidimensional experience. As a subjective concept, pain is whatever the experiencing person says it is and exists whenever the person says it does. How do we capture subjective self-report of pain when critically ill patients are unable to communicate? Verbal communication may be impaired by administration of sedatives, endotracheal intubation and mechanical ventilation, and altered level of consciousness. The purpose of this study is to determine continued reliability of the Behavioral Pain Scale (BPS) in nonverbal critically ill patients. Research is needed to document reliable observable pain indicators in order to detect and treat pain properly. The research question guiding this investigation asks "Is the behavioral pain scale (BPS) a valid and reliable tool to measure pain in nonverbal critically ill cardiac and intensive care patients?" BACKGROUND/SIGNIFICANCE:Pain that is not properly assessed and treated may lead to the development of complications for critically ill patients. Adequate and appropriate pain assessment is the first step in the detection of pain, resulting in the development, implementation, and evaluation of a plan of care to avoid complications related to unrelieved pain. Although no lone behavioral tool has been shown to be superior for use in this population, the psychometric properties, support for use in a specific patient population, and setting and ease of use should be considered when choosing a tool. METHOD: A prospective, observational design was used to collect data to answer the research question. A convenience sample of 28 subjects was observed 5 times each for a total of 280 observations (140 paired). Multiple tests for reliability were done on the data. RESULTS: A Cronbach of .86 (moderately strong internal consistency) was obtained for the BPS scale. Interrater correlations (0.76 - 1.0) for the faces subscale were statistically significant (P < .001). Interrater percent agreement (72% -74%) for the faces subscale improved tremendously over part 1Æs results (27% - 64%). CONCLUSIONS: The BPS scale is a reliable pain assessment tool for nonverbal critically ill patients. This second part of the study strengthened the positive reliability findings of part 1 by improving the interrater agreement on the faces subscales. Therefore, the BPS scale is appropriate for use in nonverbal critically ill adults for pain assessment.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
26-Oct-2011
Citation:
2010 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 19(3), e15-e28. doi:10.4037/ajcc2010866
Conference Date:
2010
Conference Name:
National Teaching Institute and Critical Care Exposition
Conference Host:
American Association of Critical-Care Nurses
Conference Location:
Washington, D.C., USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePain Assessment in Non-Verbal Critically Ill Adults Using the Behavioral Pain Scale: Part Twoen_GB
dc.contributor.authorFetherman, Brandee A.en_GB
dc.author.detailsBrandee A. Fetherman, MSN, RN, CCRN, TNCC, Morristown Memorial Hospital, Morristown, New Jersey, USA, email: Brandee.Fetherman@ahsys.orgen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/156978-
dc.description.abstractPOSTER PURPOSE: Pain is a stressor for critically ill patients. In general, pain is recognized as a subjective and multidimensional experience. As a subjective concept, pain is whatever the experiencing person says it is and exists whenever the person says it does. How do we capture subjective self-report of pain when critically ill patients are unable to communicate? Verbal communication may be impaired by administration of sedatives, endotracheal intubation and mechanical ventilation, and altered level of consciousness. The purpose of this study is to determine continued reliability of the Behavioral Pain Scale (BPS) in nonverbal critically ill patients. Research is needed to document reliable observable pain indicators in order to detect and treat pain properly. The research question guiding this investigation asks "Is the behavioral pain scale (BPS) a valid and reliable tool to measure pain in nonverbal critically ill cardiac and intensive care patients?" BACKGROUND/SIGNIFICANCE:Pain that is not properly assessed and treated may lead to the development of complications for critically ill patients. Adequate and appropriate pain assessment is the first step in the detection of pain, resulting in the development, implementation, and evaluation of a plan of care to avoid complications related to unrelieved pain. Although no lone behavioral tool has been shown to be superior for use in this population, the psychometric properties, support for use in a specific patient population, and setting and ease of use should be considered when choosing a tool. METHOD: A prospective, observational design was used to collect data to answer the research question. A convenience sample of 28 subjects was observed 5 times each for a total of 280 observations (140 paired). Multiple tests for reliability were done on the data. RESULTS: A Cronbach of .86 (moderately strong internal consistency) was obtained for the BPS scale. Interrater correlations (0.76 - 1.0) for the faces subscale were statistically significant (P < .001). Interrater percent agreement (72% -74%) for the faces subscale improved tremendously over part 1&AElig;s results (27% - 64%). CONCLUSIONS: The BPS scale is a reliable pain assessment tool for nonverbal critically ill patients. This second part of the study strengthened the positive reliability findings of part 1 by improving the interrater agreement on the faces subscales. Therefore, the BPS scale is appropriate for use in nonverbal critically ill adults for pain assessment.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:18:46Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-26en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:18:46Z-
dc.identifier.citation2010 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 19(3), e15-e28. doi:10.4037/ajcc2010866en_GB
dc.conference.date2010en_GB
dc.conference.nameNational Teaching Institute and Critical Care Expositionen_GB
dc.conference.hostAmerican Association of Critical-Care Nursesen_GB
dc.conference.locationWashington, D.C., USAen_GB
dc.identifier.citation2010 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 19(3), e15-e28. doi:10.4037/ajcc2010866en_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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