2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/156979
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Pleasant Dreams to Better Health
Author(s):
Frazier, Jon M.; Bouchard, Robin; Marston, Jeanne; Connelly, Debra; Bedenbaugh, Mary Elizabeth; Neil, Lorie; Grasso, Cynthia; Manolakis, Lisa
Author Details:
Jon M. Frazier, South Shore Hospital, South Weymouth, Massachusetts, USA, email: frazierjon@hotmail.com; Robin Bouchard; Jeanne Marston; Debra Connelly; Mary Elizabeth Bedenbaugh; Lorie Neil; Cynthia Grasso; Lisa Manolakis
Abstract:
PURPOSE: In the spring of 2009, the mixed ICU at South Shore Hospital started an initiative to evaluate the routine of restful sleep in the unit and its benefits for our patients. As more and more interventions are implemented on a daily and nightly basis, less time can be designated as rest time for most patients. REM sleep is the body's own mechanism for rejuvenation, the lack of this vital component can inhibit appropriate healing. A healthy rest environment is best accomplished by implementing both a regimen of medications and controlling the patient's environment to stimulate REM sleep states. The goal of our project will be to evaluate the advantage of a natural rest environment for patients. This will be accomplished through monitoring patient satisfaction with their healing process and hospital experience while in the mixed ICU. DESCRIPTION: During interdisciplinary daily rounds on the mixed ICU a group of nurses, doctors, and ancillary personnel frequently discussed the challenge of how to best accomplish the goal of a natural rest environment. Some of the integral components that needed to be addressed were increasing the amount of uninterrupted sleep time and the quality of rest. Several physicians agreed to use selected medications that would promote healthy REM sleep such as Precedex and Trazadone. The Precedex would be weaned as the Trazadone was started at a dose of 25 mg, increasing by increments of 25 mg until the patient was adequately resting without interruptions in their sleep pattern. Along with the medications the nursing team decided to implement a closed door policy, curtains pulled, and lights dimmed for a peaceful opportunity to sleep. This sleep would be uninterrupted by nursing staff, physicians, and ancillary personnel, all agreeing to make sure interventions were completed before the proposed sleep times. This strategy was designed to minimize distractions from rest times to enhance the overall experience for qualified patients to promote the healing process and the patient's satisfaction. EVALUATION/OUTCOMES:The patients that received the Trazadone, coupled with sleep times in an environment conducive to sleep, were reported by nursing staff to appear rested. When queried, patients reported feeling better after designated sleep times. The environment was focused on calm, peaceful, uninterrupted rest for each of the patients. Responses from the patients included that they were "thankful" that the nursing staff had allowed them to sleep undisturbed for several hours. The perception of the staff was that the patients were pleasant, and generally calmer about the challenges they were facing the rest of the day. All staff directly involved in this process have found that having their work completed around the patient's designated sleep times does not present any major problems with providing care. The current process has found a stable foothold to continue upon in the unit, and steps are being taken to enhance the experience even more for our patients and additional interventions are being considered. These additional interventions include signs placed on the doors notifying staff of the times that these patients are not to be disturbed and education for the families to ensure that they are aware of the specific rest times and its benefits so there is no conflict in visitation schedules. Any patient who is determined to be unstable is not a candidate for designated sleep times.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
26-Oct-2011
Citation:
2010 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 19(3), e15-e28. doi:10.4037/ajcc2010866
Conference Date:
2010
Conference Name:
National Teaching Institute and Critical Care Exposition
Conference Host:
American Association of Critical-Care Nurses
Conference Location:
Washington, D.C., USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePleasant Dreams to Better Healthen_GB
dc.contributor.authorFrazier, Jon M.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorBouchard, Robinen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMarston, Jeanneen_GB
dc.contributor.authorConnelly, Debraen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBedenbaugh, Mary Elizabethen_GB
dc.contributor.authorNeil, Lorieen_GB
dc.contributor.authorGrasso, Cynthiaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorManolakis, Lisaen_GB
dc.author.detailsJon M. Frazier, South Shore Hospital, South Weymouth, Massachusetts, USA, email: frazierjon@hotmail.com; Robin Bouchard; Jeanne Marston; Debra Connelly; Mary Elizabeth Bedenbaugh; Lorie Neil; Cynthia Grasso; Lisa Manolakisen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/156979-
dc.description.abstractPURPOSE: In the spring of 2009, the mixed ICU at South Shore Hospital started an initiative to evaluate the routine of restful sleep in the unit and its benefits for our patients. As more and more interventions are implemented on a daily and nightly basis, less time can be designated as rest time for most patients. REM sleep is the body's own mechanism for rejuvenation, the lack of this vital component can inhibit appropriate healing. A healthy rest environment is best accomplished by implementing both a regimen of medications and controlling the patient's environment to stimulate REM sleep states. The goal of our project will be to evaluate the advantage of a natural rest environment for patients. This will be accomplished through monitoring patient satisfaction with their healing process and hospital experience while in the mixed ICU. DESCRIPTION: During interdisciplinary daily rounds on the mixed ICU a group of nurses, doctors, and ancillary personnel frequently discussed the challenge of how to best accomplish the goal of a natural rest environment. Some of the integral components that needed to be addressed were increasing the amount of uninterrupted sleep time and the quality of rest. Several physicians agreed to use selected medications that would promote healthy REM sleep such as Precedex and Trazadone. The Precedex would be weaned as the Trazadone was started at a dose of 25 mg, increasing by increments of 25 mg until the patient was adequately resting without interruptions in their sleep pattern. Along with the medications the nursing team decided to implement a closed door policy, curtains pulled, and lights dimmed for a peaceful opportunity to sleep. This sleep would be uninterrupted by nursing staff, physicians, and ancillary personnel, all agreeing to make sure interventions were completed before the proposed sleep times. This strategy was designed to minimize distractions from rest times to enhance the overall experience for qualified patients to promote the healing process and the patient's satisfaction. EVALUATION/OUTCOMES:The patients that received the Trazadone, coupled with sleep times in an environment conducive to sleep, were reported by nursing staff to appear rested. When queried, patients reported feeling better after designated sleep times. The environment was focused on calm, peaceful, uninterrupted rest for each of the patients. Responses from the patients included that they were "thankful" that the nursing staff had allowed them to sleep undisturbed for several hours. The perception of the staff was that the patients were pleasant, and generally calmer about the challenges they were facing the rest of the day. All staff directly involved in this process have found that having their work completed around the patient's designated sleep times does not present any major problems with providing care. The current process has found a stable foothold to continue upon in the unit, and steps are being taken to enhance the experience even more for our patients and additional interventions are being considered. These additional interventions include signs placed on the doors notifying staff of the times that these patients are not to be disturbed and education for the families to ensure that they are aware of the specific rest times and its benefits so there is no conflict in visitation schedules. Any patient who is determined to be unstable is not a candidate for designated sleep times.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:18:49Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-26en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:18:49Z-
dc.identifier.citation2010 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 19(3), e15-e28. doi:10.4037/ajcc2010866en_GB
dc.conference.date2010en_GB
dc.conference.nameNational Teaching Institute and Critical Care Expositionen_GB
dc.conference.hostAmerican Association of Critical-Care Nursesen_GB
dc.conference.locationWashington, D.C., USAen_GB
dc.identifier.citation2010 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 19(3), e15-e28. doi:10.4037/ajcc2010866en_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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