Nurses?? perceptions of the feasibility of the use of the Critical-Care Pain Observation Tool

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/156984
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Nurses?? perceptions of the feasibility of the use of the Critical-Care Pain Observation Tool
Author(s):
Gelinas, Celine
Author Details:
Celine Gelinas, RN,DSN,PhD, McGill University, School of Nursing, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, email: celine.gelinas@mcgill.ca
Abstract:
POSTER PURPOSE: To describe the perceptions of nurses in the intensive care unit (ICU) of the feasibility of the use of the Critical-Care Pain Observation Tool (CPOT) in a research context. Feasibility refers to the ease with which the clinicians can apply the tool (eg, simple to understand, easy to complete, quick to use) within the clinical setting. BACKGROUND/SIGNIFICANCE:The CPOT is a behavioral pain scale that was developed for critically ill adults and is suggested in the clinical recommendations of the American Society for Pain Management Nursing (2006) for pain assessment in unconscious or critically ill nonverbal patients. Although the psychometric properties of the CPOT are well described, no study has yet explored nursesÆ experience with the use of this tool in terms of its feasibility. METHOD: A descriptive design was used for this study. A total of 51 ICU nurses from a university health care center in Montreal (Canada) were trained and used the CPOT for the research purpose of validation of the tool with enrolled ICU patients. At the conclusion of that validation study, the nurses were asked to complete a self-administered questionnaire about the feasibility (ie, length of time of training, time for assessment, clarity of directives, tool structure, scoring method, recommendation to use the CPOT routinely, how helpful it is for practice, how it influenced nursing practice) of the CPOT. RESULTS: Thirty-three ICU nurses returned their completed questionnaire. All nurses agreed that the directives for its use were clear and that it was easy to complete. Some nurses specified that some items were difficult to score (eg, facial expressions, body movements). A total of 24 nurses agreed that the CPOT was helpful for practice and recommended its use routinely as it provides a standardized way to assess patientsÆ pain. Other nurses pointed out the lack of specificity of some indicators (eg, agitation), and that the tool was not applicable for every nonverbal ICU patient (eg, heavily sedated, chemically paralyzed). CONCLUSIONS: The CPOT was easy to use and relevant for practice by ICU nurses who used it in a research context. Although further research is warranted to evaluate its feasibility in routine care, the CPOT appears to support ICU nurses in the assessment of their patientsÆ pain and could contribute to better pain control in critically ill adults. Based on this finding, it is urgent that clinical guidelines of pain assessment in nonverbal patients be implemented into practice.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
26-Oct-2011
Citation:
2010 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 19(3), e15-e28. doi:10.4037/ajcc2010866
Conference Date:
2010
Conference Name:
National Teaching Institute and Critical Care Exposition
Conference Host:
American Association of Critical-Care Nurses
Conference Location:
Washington, D.C., USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNurses?? perceptions of the feasibility of the use of the Critical-Care Pain Observation Toolen_GB
dc.contributor.authorGelinas, Celineen_GB
dc.author.detailsCeline Gelinas, RN,DSN,PhD, McGill University, School of Nursing, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, email: celine.gelinas@mcgill.caen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/156984-
dc.description.abstractPOSTER PURPOSE: To describe the perceptions of nurses in the intensive care unit (ICU) of the feasibility of the use of the Critical-Care Pain Observation Tool (CPOT) in a research context. Feasibility refers to the ease with which the clinicians can apply the tool (eg, simple to understand, easy to complete, quick to use) within the clinical setting. BACKGROUND/SIGNIFICANCE:The CPOT is a behavioral pain scale that was developed for critically ill adults and is suggested in the clinical recommendations of the American Society for Pain Management Nursing (2006) for pain assessment in unconscious or critically ill nonverbal patients. Although the psychometric properties of the CPOT are well described, no study has yet explored nursesÆ experience with the use of this tool in terms of its feasibility. METHOD: A descriptive design was used for this study. A total of 51 ICU nurses from a university health care center in Montreal (Canada) were trained and used the CPOT for the research purpose of validation of the tool with enrolled ICU patients. At the conclusion of that validation study, the nurses were asked to complete a self-administered questionnaire about the feasibility (ie, length of time of training, time for assessment, clarity of directives, tool structure, scoring method, recommendation to use the CPOT routinely, how helpful it is for practice, how it influenced nursing practice) of the CPOT. RESULTS: Thirty-three ICU nurses returned their completed questionnaire. All nurses agreed that the directives for its use were clear and that it was easy to complete. Some nurses specified that some items were difficult to score (eg, facial expressions, body movements). A total of 24 nurses agreed that the CPOT was helpful for practice and recommended its use routinely as it provides a standardized way to assess patientsÆ pain. Other nurses pointed out the lack of specificity of some indicators (eg, agitation), and that the tool was not applicable for every nonverbal ICU patient (eg, heavily sedated, chemically paralyzed). CONCLUSIONS: The CPOT was easy to use and relevant for practice by ICU nurses who used it in a research context. Although further research is warranted to evaluate its feasibility in routine care, the CPOT appears to support ICU nurses in the assessment of their patientsÆ pain and could contribute to better pain control in critically ill adults. Based on this finding, it is urgent that clinical guidelines of pain assessment in nonverbal patients be implemented into practice.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:19:06Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-26en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:19:06Z-
dc.identifier.citation2010 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 19(3), e15-e28. doi:10.4037/ajcc2010866en_GB
dc.conference.date2010en_GB
dc.conference.nameNational Teaching Institute and Critical Care Expositionen_GB
dc.conference.hostAmerican Association of Critical-Care Nursesen_GB
dc.conference.locationWashington, D.C., USAen_GB
dc.identifier.citation2010 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 19(3), e15-e28. doi:10.4037/ajcc2010866en_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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