Inclusion in Care: Implementing Family Centered Care in a Small Community Hospital Beacon ICU

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/156986
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Inclusion in Care: Implementing Family Centered Care in a Small Community Hospital Beacon ICU
Author(s):
Gooding, Martha C.; Lindsey, Roseanne
Author Details:
Martha C. Gooding, RN,BS,CCRN,CRN, Seton Northwest Hospital, Austin, Texas, USA, email: mgooding@seton.org; Roseanne Lindsey
Abstract:
PURPOSE: Families face overwhelming fear and stress when a loved one is a patient in ICU. They strive to cope with frustrating, devastating, and frightening changes that affect not only the patient but the entire family unit. The staff in our ICU brainstormed to find ways to help families cope with these overwhelming events. Staff chose to help families answer 5 basic questions affecting their loved ones: Who is caring for the patient? What's happening? Why? What's next? Where to go to for assistance? DESCRIPTION: To facilitate this interaction with patients and their families, staff uses white boards in the rooms listing names of staff caring for them, goals for the day, and other useful information. Also, families are included in patient care rounds on Monday, Wednesday, and Friday. They meet the entire patient care team, including chaplain, pharmacist, social worker, case manager, dietician, RTs, physicians, and discuss with the group the plan of care and goals. All disciplines offer input to ensure excellent patient care. Families are encouraged to ask questions and give input. The physician speaks with patients and available family daily and follows them throughout their entire hospital stay. Our ICU staff created posters and pamphlets for patient and family teaching with information describing complex devices, procedures, CRT, HIPAA and palliative care. We also compiled a resource book with maps and information to assist families in unfamiliar surroundings. Families are encouraged to be involved in care. Diversity in religious practices and customs is respected, and translators are available if necessary. ICU staff created an open visiting policy that allows families in the unit during codes with support from trained hospital staff. EVALUATION/OUTCOMES: Family-centered care interventions have been received positively by families, patients, and nurses. Many families and patients have kept in contact with ICU staff over the years, sending the unit updates of their progress after ICU. Families realize that they are respected and included as an integral part of the patient care team. Staff have facilitated special family requests, such as weddings, pet therapy, and religious ceremonies. The staff acknowledges that a comforted, informed, and actively involved family imparts less stress onto the patient and helps the patient cope with the difficulties of being critically ill. Through ICU team collaboration, our unit demonstrates Beacon values everyday.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
26-Oct-2011
Citation:
2010 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 19(3), e15-e28. doi:10.4037/ajcc2010866
Conference Date:
2010
Conference Name:
National Teaching Institute and Critical Care Exposition
Conference Host:
American Association of Critical-Care Nurses
Conference Location:
Washington, D.C., USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleInclusion in Care: Implementing Family Centered Care in a Small Community Hospital Beacon ICUen_GB
dc.contributor.authorGooding, Martha C.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorLindsey, Roseanneen_GB
dc.author.detailsMartha C. Gooding, RN,BS,CCRN,CRN, Seton Northwest Hospital, Austin, Texas, USA, email: mgooding@seton.org; Roseanne Lindseyen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/156986-
dc.description.abstractPURPOSE: Families face overwhelming fear and stress when a loved one is a patient in ICU. They strive to cope with frustrating, devastating, and frightening changes that affect not only the patient but the entire family unit. The staff in our ICU brainstormed to find ways to help families cope with these overwhelming events. Staff chose to help families answer 5 basic questions affecting their loved ones: Who is caring for the patient? What's happening? Why? What's next? Where to go to for assistance? DESCRIPTION: To facilitate this interaction with patients and their families, staff uses white boards in the rooms listing names of staff caring for them, goals for the day, and other useful information. Also, families are included in patient care rounds on Monday, Wednesday, and Friday. They meet the entire patient care team, including chaplain, pharmacist, social worker, case manager, dietician, RTs, physicians, and discuss with the group the plan of care and goals. All disciplines offer input to ensure excellent patient care. Families are encouraged to ask questions and give input. The physician speaks with patients and available family daily and follows them throughout their entire hospital stay. Our ICU staff created posters and pamphlets for patient and family teaching with information describing complex devices, procedures, CRT, HIPAA and palliative care. We also compiled a resource book with maps and information to assist families in unfamiliar surroundings. Families are encouraged to be involved in care. Diversity in religious practices and customs is respected, and translators are available if necessary. ICU staff created an open visiting policy that allows families in the unit during codes with support from trained hospital staff. EVALUATION/OUTCOMES: Family-centered care interventions have been received positively by families, patients, and nurses. Many families and patients have kept in contact with ICU staff over the years, sending the unit updates of their progress after ICU. Families realize that they are respected and included as an integral part of the patient care team. Staff have facilitated special family requests, such as weddings, pet therapy, and religious ceremonies. The staff acknowledges that a comforted, informed, and actively involved family imparts less stress onto the patient and helps the patient cope with the difficulties of being critically ill. Through ICU team collaboration, our unit demonstrates Beacon values everyday.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:19:12Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-26en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:19:12Z-
dc.identifier.citation2010 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 19(3), e15-e28. doi:10.4037/ajcc2010866en_GB
dc.conference.date2010en_GB
dc.conference.nameNational Teaching Institute and Critical Care Expositionen_GB
dc.conference.hostAmerican Association of Critical-Care Nursesen_GB
dc.conference.locationWashington, D.C., USAen_GB
dc.identifier.citation2010 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 19(3), e15-e28. doi:10.4037/ajcc2010866en_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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