2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/156988
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Promoting Independence in Staff Research Teams
Author(s):
Granger, Bradi L.; Johnson, Rebecca
Author Details:
Bradi L. Granger, RN,PhD,FAAN, Duke University Health System, Durham, North Carolina, USA, email: grang004@mc.duke.edu; Rebecca Johnson
Abstract:
PURPOSE: Sparking an interest in clinical inquiry, the first step of nursing research, can be a challenge. Sustaining that interest once the project is started can be an even greater challenge. In our teaching hospital, staff nurses felt confident posing relevant clinical questions but lacked the skill and tools to move forward. Hurdles to progression of research included difficulty searching the literature, lack of experience using the IRB, and an elementary understanding of the research process. DESCRIPTION: Nurses new to research are enthusiastic about clinical inquiry and are able to pose relevant questions. Although we were energized by the increasing numbers of nurses interested in research, we quickly realized that successfully engaging staff in asking questions was only the beginning. Major hurdles lay ahead. Most had no previous knowledge of navigating the complexities of creating a protocol, working with the IRB, and analyzing data. To help build skills, our nurse researcher created an informational booklet that clearly and succinctly described 8 steps in the research process: identifying a research question, creating a research team, reviewing the literature, developing a protocol, getting through IRB approval, enrolling patients, collecting data, analyzing data, and sharing outcomes. The booklet begins with a table of contents that is color coded to the chapter information. Side boxes highlight staff nurse responsibilities and the available resources to accomplish each step. The brochure is concise and well structured, and it is based on sound practice with references to current texts for additional information. EVALUATION/OUTCOMES:The booklet has provided staff with an uncomplicated, yet accurate map for proceeding with clinical research. Now, instead of having to repeatedly meet with the nurse researcher, independence is promoted by methodically moving the novice researcher forward on her own. Because time spent with the nurse researcher is used more effectively, she is able to meet with more individuals to mentor and support projects. Importantly, promoting individual staff success has spurred an increased interest in engaging in research. Currently we have 18 studies ongoing, 9 completed and 4 published.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
26-Oct-2011
Citation:
2010 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 19(3), e15-e28. doi:10.4037/ajcc2010866
Conference Date:
2010
Conference Name:
National Teaching Institute and Critical Care Exposition
Conference Host:
American Association of Critical-Care Nurses
Conference Location:
Washington, D.C., USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePromoting Independence in Staff Research Teamsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorGranger, Bradi L.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorJohnson, Rebeccaen_GB
dc.author.detailsBradi L. Granger, RN,PhD,FAAN, Duke University Health System, Durham, North Carolina, USA, email: grang004@mc.duke.edu; Rebecca Johnsonen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/156988-
dc.description.abstractPURPOSE: Sparking an interest in clinical inquiry, the first step of nursing research, can be a challenge. Sustaining that interest once the project is started can be an even greater challenge. In our teaching hospital, staff nurses felt confident posing relevant clinical questions but lacked the skill and tools to move forward. Hurdles to progression of research included difficulty searching the literature, lack of experience using the IRB, and an elementary understanding of the research process. DESCRIPTION: Nurses new to research are enthusiastic about clinical inquiry and are able to pose relevant questions. Although we were energized by the increasing numbers of nurses interested in research, we quickly realized that successfully engaging staff in asking questions was only the beginning. Major hurdles lay ahead. Most had no previous knowledge of navigating the complexities of creating a protocol, working with the IRB, and analyzing data. To help build skills, our nurse researcher created an informational booklet that clearly and succinctly described 8 steps in the research process: identifying a research question, creating a research team, reviewing the literature, developing a protocol, getting through IRB approval, enrolling patients, collecting data, analyzing data, and sharing outcomes. The booklet begins with a table of contents that is color coded to the chapter information. Side boxes highlight staff nurse responsibilities and the available resources to accomplish each step. The brochure is concise and well structured, and it is based on sound practice with references to current texts for additional information. EVALUATION/OUTCOMES:The booklet has provided staff with an uncomplicated, yet accurate map for proceeding with clinical research. Now, instead of having to repeatedly meet with the nurse researcher, independence is promoted by methodically moving the novice researcher forward on her own. Because time spent with the nurse researcher is used more effectively, she is able to meet with more individuals to mentor and support projects. Importantly, promoting individual staff success has spurred an increased interest in engaging in research. Currently we have 18 studies ongoing, 9 completed and 4 published.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:19:19Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-26en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:19:19Z-
dc.identifier.citation2010 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 19(3), e15-e28. doi:10.4037/ajcc2010866en_GB
dc.conference.date2010en_GB
dc.conference.nameNational Teaching Institute and Critical Care Expositionen_GB
dc.conference.hostAmerican Association of Critical-Care Nursesen_GB
dc.conference.locationWashington, D.C., USAen_GB
dc.identifier.citation2010 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 19(3), e15-e28. doi:10.4037/ajcc2010866en_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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