2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/156990
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Institution of a Nurse Mentorship Program in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU)
Author(s):
Green, Kellie
Author Details:
Kellie Green, RN, University of Washington Medical Center, Seattle, Washington, USA, email: kgarth@u.washington.edu
Abstract:
PURPOSE: The medical surgical transplant ICU at our academic medical center had a high turnover rate in 2005. It was recognized that although we had a strong orientation program, we lacked formal support after the orientation period ended. To bridge this gap, a mentor-ship program was initiated to support and improve our retention of new graduate nurses in the ICU. DESCRIPTION: In 2006 we built and piloted the mentorship program; one new graduate nurse was paired with a seasoned ICU nurse. Education was provided to explain the difference between mentoring and precepting. The mentorship program began at the completion of orientation and continued until the 1-year anniversary of the new employee. The program was supported by the nursing unit leadership team by providing funds to pay the mentor and mentee for meetings outside of work for 1 hour each month. In addition to the meetings outside of work, the mentee and mentor scheduled themselves on the same days 4 times per month. A confidence tool from the 17-item American Academy of Medical Surgical nurses was adapted to evaluate the new nurse's confidence in the ICU. The tool was administered at the onset of mentoring and again at the end of the mentorship period. Initial feedback and successes led us to expand the program to include 40 new graduate nurses over the next 2.5 years. The mentor/mentee meetings were formalized and expanded, incorporating both a social component and a curriculum that focused on self-care and clinical topics. EVALUATION/OUTCOMES: Data were collected from 26 nurses (24 before and 12 after, 10 nurses with paired pre-post data). On average, confidence scores increased by 25 plus or minus 1% (P<.001) (before, 69 plus or minus 12%; after, 94 plus or minus 9%). Paired data demonstrated a 20 plus or minus 7% (P <.001) (before, 69 plus or minus 12%; after, 94 plus or minus 9%). Paired data demonstrated an increase in confidence on all 17 items. Examples of improved confidence that were specifically targeted during program included discuss the patientÆs condition with physician (60% with increased confidence) and ability to refuse to follow a physicianÆs order if I question the correctness for the patient (90% with increased confidence). The ICU turnover rates decreased from 24 plus or minus 2% in 2006 to 15 plus or minus 4% in 2007 and 14 plus or minus 2.5% through 2008.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
26-Oct-2011
Citation:
2010 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 19(3), e15-e28. doi:10.4037/ajcc2010866
Conference Date:
2010
Conference Name:
National Teaching Institute and Critical Care Exposition
Conference Host:
American Association of Critical-Care Nurses
Conference Location:
Washington, D.C., USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleInstitution of a Nurse Mentorship Program in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU)en_GB
dc.contributor.authorGreen, Kellieen_GB
dc.author.detailsKellie Green, RN, University of Washington Medical Center, Seattle, Washington, USA, email: kgarth@u.washington.eduen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/156990-
dc.description.abstractPURPOSE: The medical surgical transplant ICU at our academic medical center had a high turnover rate in 2005. It was recognized that although we had a strong orientation program, we lacked formal support after the orientation period ended. To bridge this gap, a mentor-ship program was initiated to support and improve our retention of new graduate nurses in the ICU. DESCRIPTION: In 2006 we built and piloted the mentorship program; one new graduate nurse was paired with a seasoned ICU nurse. Education was provided to explain the difference between mentoring and precepting. The mentorship program began at the completion of orientation and continued until the 1-year anniversary of the new employee. The program was supported by the nursing unit leadership team by providing funds to pay the mentor and mentee for meetings outside of work for 1 hour each month. In addition to the meetings outside of work, the mentee and mentor scheduled themselves on the same days 4 times per month. A confidence tool from the 17-item American Academy of Medical Surgical nurses was adapted to evaluate the new nurse's confidence in the ICU. The tool was administered at the onset of mentoring and again at the end of the mentorship period. Initial feedback and successes led us to expand the program to include 40 new graduate nurses over the next 2.5 years. The mentor/mentee meetings were formalized and expanded, incorporating both a social component and a curriculum that focused on self-care and clinical topics. EVALUATION/OUTCOMES: Data were collected from 26 nurses (24 before and 12 after, 10 nurses with paired pre-post data). On average, confidence scores increased by 25 plus or minus 1% (P<.001) (before, 69 plus or minus 12%; after, 94 plus or minus 9%). Paired data demonstrated a 20 plus or minus 7% (P <.001) (before, 69 plus or minus 12%; after, 94 plus or minus 9%). Paired data demonstrated an increase in confidence on all 17 items. Examples of improved confidence that were specifically targeted during program included discuss the patient&AElig;s condition with physician (60% with increased confidence) and ability to refuse to follow a physician&AElig;s order if I question the correctness for the patient (90% with increased confidence). The ICU turnover rates decreased from 24 plus or minus 2% in 2006 to 15 plus or minus 4% in 2007 and 14 plus or minus 2.5% through 2008.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:19:26Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-26en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:19:26Z-
dc.identifier.citation2010 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 19(3), e15-e28. doi:10.4037/ajcc2010866en_GB
dc.conference.date2010en_GB
dc.conference.nameNational Teaching Institute and Critical Care Expositionen_GB
dc.conference.hostAmerican Association of Critical-Care Nursesen_GB
dc.conference.locationWashington, D.C., USAen_GB
dc.identifier.citation2010 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 19(3), e15-e28. doi:10.4037/ajcc2010866en_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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