Multifaceted Approach Successful in Reducing Central Line Associated Bloodstream Infections

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/156991
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Multifaceted Approach Successful in Reducing Central Line Associated Bloodstream Infections
Author(s):
Guerin, Karen L.
Author Details:
Karen L. Guerin, RN,BSN,MSHA,CCRN, Denver VAMC, Denver, Colorado, USA, email: karlynklg@msn.com
Abstract:
POSTER PURPOSE: To evaluate the effectiveness of evidence-based interventions and infection prevention education to reduce bloodstream infections associated with central catheters (CLABSIs) in intensive care units. This study also validated the need for continuous education on care of central catheters and customized intravenous supplies and kits for sustained improvements. BACKGROUND/SIGNIFICANCE:CLABSIs have been of national interest as health care - associated infection and mortality rates continue to increase. In response to growing concern over infection rates, a task force was chartered to identify vulnerabilities and make recommendations based on literature-supported best practices. Intensive care units (ICUs) were selected as the pilot units for improvement based on the high risk of infection and the critical nature of the patients. METHOD: Data on CLABSIs were collected by infection preventionists who used definitions from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to identify infections and central catheter days. Interventions and infection prevention education were developed from recommendations of the CDC, Institute for Healthcare Improvement, the Society for Health-care Epidemiology of America, and the Joint Commission. The implementation of an intravenous team was supported by the literature to sustain high-quality intravenous care. The intravenous team and the infection control staff worked to provide hands-on training and education to all levels of providers. Additional training on insertion of central catheters was provided to medical residents via a simulation laboratory. RESULTS: Previous fiscal year (FY) infection rates per 1000 catheter days were 12.9 (FY06) and 6.0 (FY07) for the intensive care units. Postintervention rate for FY08 was 5.1, and as of April FY09 the rate for the ICUs was 1.5 per 1000 catheter days (P=.02). In FY08 there were 5 insertion-related infections, and as of April FY09 there have been zero. Upon receiving education, staff in 1 ICU became more involved in infection prevention practices. The unit developed a bundled, central catheter maintenance checklist and educational briefs on identified pathogens. Since the bundle was developed, it has been shared with the other ICU and has become the foundation for a national central catheter maintenance bundle work group. CONCLUSIONS: The interventions to reduce infections associated with central catheters resulted in successful improvement in the CLABSI rates for the ICUs. The intravenous team developed core teaching principles that led to facility-supported classes for all providers that access intravenous catheters. The acute care areas of the facility also experienced a reduction in CLABSIs as a result of the intensive education. An unexpected outcome was the improved infection prevention practices developed by the ICU staff to further reduce CLABSIs.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
26-Oct-2011
Citation:
2010 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 19(3), e15-e28. doi:10.4037/ajcc2010866
Conference Date:
2010
Conference Name:
National Teaching Institute and Critical Care Exposition
Conference Host:
American Association of Critical-Care Nurses
Conference Location:
Washington, D.C., USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMultifaceted Approach Successful in Reducing Central Line Associated Bloodstream Infectionsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorGuerin, Karen L.en_GB
dc.author.detailsKaren L. Guerin, RN,BSN,MSHA,CCRN, Denver VAMC, Denver, Colorado, USA, email: karlynklg@msn.comen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/156991-
dc.description.abstractPOSTER PURPOSE: To evaluate the effectiveness of evidence-based interventions and infection prevention education to reduce bloodstream infections associated with central catheters (CLABSIs) in intensive care units. This study also validated the need for continuous education on care of central catheters and customized intravenous supplies and kits for sustained improvements. BACKGROUND/SIGNIFICANCE:CLABSIs have been of national interest as health care - associated infection and mortality rates continue to increase. In response to growing concern over infection rates, a task force was chartered to identify vulnerabilities and make recommendations based on literature-supported best practices. Intensive care units (ICUs) were selected as the pilot units for improvement based on the high risk of infection and the critical nature of the patients. METHOD: Data on CLABSIs were collected by infection preventionists who used definitions from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to identify infections and central catheter days. Interventions and infection prevention education were developed from recommendations of the CDC, Institute for Healthcare Improvement, the Society for Health-care Epidemiology of America, and the Joint Commission. The implementation of an intravenous team was supported by the literature to sustain high-quality intravenous care. The intravenous team and the infection control staff worked to provide hands-on training and education to all levels of providers. Additional training on insertion of central catheters was provided to medical residents via a simulation laboratory. RESULTS: Previous fiscal year (FY) infection rates per 1000 catheter days were 12.9 (FY06) and 6.0 (FY07) for the intensive care units. Postintervention rate for FY08 was 5.1, and as of April FY09 the rate for the ICUs was 1.5 per 1000 catheter days (P=.02). In FY08 there were 5 insertion-related infections, and as of April FY09 there have been zero. Upon receiving education, staff in 1 ICU became more involved in infection prevention practices. The unit developed a bundled, central catheter maintenance checklist and educational briefs on identified pathogens. Since the bundle was developed, it has been shared with the other ICU and has become the foundation for a national central catheter maintenance bundle work group. CONCLUSIONS: The interventions to reduce infections associated with central catheters resulted in successful improvement in the CLABSI rates for the ICUs. The intravenous team developed core teaching principles that led to facility-supported classes for all providers that access intravenous catheters. The acute care areas of the facility also experienced a reduction in CLABSIs as a result of the intensive education. An unexpected outcome was the improved infection prevention practices developed by the ICU staff to further reduce CLABSIs.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:19:29Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-26en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:19:29Z-
dc.identifier.citation2010 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 19(3), e15-e28. doi:10.4037/ajcc2010866en_GB
dc.conference.date2010en_GB
dc.conference.nameNational Teaching Institute and Critical Care Expositionen_GB
dc.conference.hostAmerican Association of Critical-Care Nursesen_GB
dc.conference.locationWashington, D.C., USAen_GB
dc.identifier.citation2010 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 19(3), e15-e28. doi:10.4037/ajcc2010866en_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.