A Cardiac Resuscitation Unit (CRU) Development: An Interdisciplinary Approach to Post-Resuscitation Care

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/156994
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A Cardiac Resuscitation Unit (CRU) Development: An Interdisciplinary Approach to Post-Resuscitation Care
Author(s):
Hallinan, William M.
Author Details:
William M. Hallinan, RN,MS,EMT-P, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, New York, USA, email: william_hallinan@urmc.rochester.edu
Abstract:
PURPOSE: The coordinated care of the postresuscitation patient is a complex, time sensitive process that requires a specific skill set sensitive to the critical illness of the patient and the devastation brought onto the family. The purpose in developing a cardiac resuscitation unit (CRU) was to organize a functional unit of team members capable of routinely addressing the needs and process required for this patient population. DESCRIPTION: The in-hospital postresuscitation care of patients has become a complex process of patient triage, stabilization, coronary revascularization, hypothermia induction, mechanical circulatory support, neuro-protection, and inflammatory mitigation. Several years ago a team of nurses, cardiologists, and neurologists were assembled to create a process for the initiation of induced hypothermia. Over time this unique population grew, and with it came experience and increased knowledge of how complex the coordination of resources was. Additionally, it became apparent that it was more than successfully initiating a hypothermia protocol and safe patient monitoring, it was rapid patient triage, swift revascularization, family education and support, monitoring and quickly controlling nonconvulsive seizure activity, and escalating circulatory support when necessary. Two critical care nurses were appointed initially as hypothermia coordinators but their role was changed to CRU coordinators. These nurses coordinate the education, response, patient care, quality assurance, and interdisciplinary CRU team. They have developed continuing regional education and clinical practice guidelines to facilitate the care of these patients. EVALUATION/OUTCOMES:The evaluation of this project has demonstrated the need and value of the CRU. This medical center continues to care for more than 100 sudden death survivors annually and ongoing metrics continue to demonstrate superiority over outcomes seen with postresuscitation studies. The critical care nurse approach to care coordination provides the base of organized patient and family centered care. Further scientific research into this approach defining the need for a coordinated interdisciplinary team response is ongoing.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
26-Oct-2011
Citation:
2010 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 19(3), e15-e28. doi:10.4037/ajcc2010866
Conference Date:
2010
Conference Name:
National Teaching Institute and Critical Care Exposition
Conference Host:
American Association of Critical-Care Nurses
Conference Location:
Washington, D.C., USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA Cardiac Resuscitation Unit (CRU) Development: An Interdisciplinary Approach to Post-Resuscitation Careen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHallinan, William M.en_GB
dc.author.detailsWilliam M. Hallinan, RN,MS,EMT-P, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, New York, USA, email: william_hallinan@urmc.rochester.eduen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/156994-
dc.description.abstractPURPOSE: The coordinated care of the postresuscitation patient is a complex, time sensitive process that requires a specific skill set sensitive to the critical illness of the patient and the devastation brought onto the family. The purpose in developing a cardiac resuscitation unit (CRU) was to organize a functional unit of team members capable of routinely addressing the needs and process required for this patient population. DESCRIPTION: The in-hospital postresuscitation care of patients has become a complex process of patient triage, stabilization, coronary revascularization, hypothermia induction, mechanical circulatory support, neuro-protection, and inflammatory mitigation. Several years ago a team of nurses, cardiologists, and neurologists were assembled to create a process for the initiation of induced hypothermia. Over time this unique population grew, and with it came experience and increased knowledge of how complex the coordination of resources was. Additionally, it became apparent that it was more than successfully initiating a hypothermia protocol and safe patient monitoring, it was rapid patient triage, swift revascularization, family education and support, monitoring and quickly controlling nonconvulsive seizure activity, and escalating circulatory support when necessary. Two critical care nurses were appointed initially as hypothermia coordinators but their role was changed to CRU coordinators. These nurses coordinate the education, response, patient care, quality assurance, and interdisciplinary CRU team. They have developed continuing regional education and clinical practice guidelines to facilitate the care of these patients. EVALUATION/OUTCOMES:The evaluation of this project has demonstrated the need and value of the CRU. This medical center continues to care for more than 100 sudden death survivors annually and ongoing metrics continue to demonstrate superiority over outcomes seen with postresuscitation studies. The critical care nurse approach to care coordination provides the base of organized patient and family centered care. Further scientific research into this approach defining the need for a coordinated interdisciplinary team response is ongoing.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:19:36Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-26en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:19:36Z-
dc.identifier.citation2010 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 19(3), e15-e28. doi:10.4037/ajcc2010866en_GB
dc.conference.date2010en_GB
dc.conference.nameNational Teaching Institute and Critical Care Expositionen_GB
dc.conference.hostAmerican Association of Critical-Care Nursesen_GB
dc.conference.locationWashington, D.C., USAen_GB
dc.identifier.citation2010 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 19(3), e15-e28. doi:10.4037/ajcc2010866en_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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