2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/156995
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Collaborating with Patients and Families: Creating an Intensive Care Unit (ICU) Guidebook
Author(s):
Haverland, Amy E.
Author Details:
Amy E. Haverland, RN,BSN,CCRN, University of Washington Medical Center, Seattle, Washington, USA, email: ameshavs@aol.com
Abstract:
PURPOSE: A Patient and Family Advisory Council (PFAC) was established to promote a change toward patient-centered care in our ICU. Council membership is composed of former patients and family members, staff nurses, managers, social workers, and physicians. Patient and family participants reported that the amount of information to take in during an ICU stay was overwhelming and stressful. PFAC recommended development of a reference manual for information frequently presented to ICU patients and family. DESCRIPTION: Based on feedback and in collaboration with families, a single source of information was designed. Open discussions with the PFAC advisers resulted in a list of information they wished they had known or found useful in their experience. Examples of requested information included what an ICU is, visiting policies, equipment, structure of physician staff, rights as an advocate, phone numbers, and locations of resources. Staff nurses added additional frequently asked questions. Volunteers from the Council formed a committee that met monthly. Sections were created based on similar content and divided among the group for writing. Sections were then collected and submitted to the University of Washington Medical Center Patient and Family Education Services for editing for cohesiveness and reading level. Drafts were reviewed by the committee and presented to the full Council and ICU charge nurse group for approval. The ICU Guidebook made final print May 2009, 10 months after the project was initiated. This resource is distributed to patients and families of patients determined to need several days of ICU care. EVALUATION/OUTCOMES:Patient satisfaction scores were compared before and after implementation of the ICU Guidebook, using the Press Ganey system for satisfaction scoring. Specifically, the category asking patients and families to rate understanding of treatment and condition showed improvement from the 14th to the 53rd percentile. Mean scores in overall satisfaction improved from 88.6 to 91.1, on a scale of 100. Feedback from ICU volunteers has been overwhelmingly positive, noting that patient and family members have found the resource to be quite helpful. It has been suggested to expand distribution of the guidebook to the surgical waiting rooms.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
26-Oct-2011
Citation:
2010 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 19(3), e15-e28. doi:10.4037/ajcc2010866
Conference Date:
2010
Conference Name:
National Teaching Institute and Critical Care Exposition
Conference Host:
American Association of Critical-Care Nurses
Conference Location:
Washington, D.C., USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCollaborating with Patients and Families: Creating an Intensive Care Unit (ICU) Guidebooken_GB
dc.contributor.authorHaverland, Amy E.en_GB
dc.author.detailsAmy E. Haverland, RN,BSN,CCRN, University of Washington Medical Center, Seattle, Washington, USA, email: ameshavs@aol.comen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/156995-
dc.description.abstractPURPOSE: A Patient and Family Advisory Council (PFAC) was established to promote a change toward patient-centered care in our ICU. Council membership is composed of former patients and family members, staff nurses, managers, social workers, and physicians. Patient and family participants reported that the amount of information to take in during an ICU stay was overwhelming and stressful. PFAC recommended development of a reference manual for information frequently presented to ICU patients and family. DESCRIPTION: Based on feedback and in collaboration with families, a single source of information was designed. Open discussions with the PFAC advisers resulted in a list of information they wished they had known or found useful in their experience. Examples of requested information included what an ICU is, visiting policies, equipment, structure of physician staff, rights as an advocate, phone numbers, and locations of resources. Staff nurses added additional frequently asked questions. Volunteers from the Council formed a committee that met monthly. Sections were created based on similar content and divided among the group for writing. Sections were then collected and submitted to the University of Washington Medical Center Patient and Family Education Services for editing for cohesiveness and reading level. Drafts were reviewed by the committee and presented to the full Council and ICU charge nurse group for approval. The ICU Guidebook made final print May 2009, 10 months after the project was initiated. This resource is distributed to patients and families of patients determined to need several days of ICU care. EVALUATION/OUTCOMES:Patient satisfaction scores were compared before and after implementation of the ICU Guidebook, using the Press Ganey system for satisfaction scoring. Specifically, the category asking patients and families to rate understanding of treatment and condition showed improvement from the 14th to the 53rd percentile. Mean scores in overall satisfaction improved from 88.6 to 91.1, on a scale of 100. Feedback from ICU volunteers has been overwhelmingly positive, noting that patient and family members have found the resource to be quite helpful. It has been suggested to expand distribution of the guidebook to the surgical waiting rooms.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:19:39Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-26en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:19:39Z-
dc.identifier.citation2010 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 19(3), e15-e28. doi:10.4037/ajcc2010866en_GB
dc.conference.date2010en_GB
dc.conference.nameNational Teaching Institute and Critical Care Expositionen_GB
dc.conference.hostAmerican Association of Critical-Care Nursesen_GB
dc.conference.locationWashington, D.C., USAen_GB
dc.identifier.citation2010 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 19(3), e15-e28. doi:10.4037/ajcc2010866en_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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