2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/156997
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Making an Impact: a Rapid Response Team's (RRT) Proactive Approach
Author(s):
Hicks, Heather; Miller, Patricia; Greig, Christina; Delvecchio, Heidi
Author Details:
Heather Hicks, RN,BSN,CCRN, University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Cleveland, Ohio, USA, email: heather8636@yahoo.com; Patricia Miller; Christina Greig; Heidi Delvecchio
Abstract:
PURPOSE: In February 2006, our rapid response team (RRT) began having an ICU nurse respond to calls on a medical-surgical division. This role, in addition to caring for ICU patients, stressed the ICU nurse. This stress increased as the program expanded. The solution was to employ a dedicated RRT nurse. As a result, the approach became proactive to optimize the benefits of the RRT: increasing the number of patients seen, decreasing the number of codes and the mortality ratio, and improving overall nursing satisfaction. DESCRIPTION: By October 2006 the program had expanded to all medical-surgical divisions and a dedicated RRT nurse was added to cover nights and weekends. The RRT nurse identified, assessed, and advocated for patients at risk of declining, and responded to patients actively decompensating. The nurse rounded on medical-surgical divisions, assessed patients transferred from the ICU (for 48 hours), and responded to calls. As a result of the dedicated RRT nurse rounding, a significant increase in calls was evident. In addition, the stress felt by the ICU nurse was only alleviated part of the time. Thus, a pilot began in November 2007 with a dedicated RRT nurse 24/7. The number of ICU transfer patients seen, calls, reason for the call, and the disposition of patient were tracked. Those who initiated the call completed surveys. Having a sole RRT allows for quality nursing support, teaching, promotion of teamwork, advocating for patients and connecting with families. These dynamics help facilitate a healthy work environment. In addition to rounding and responding to calls, the RRT nurse reassesses patients who remain on the division following RRT calls. Driven by patient needs, critical care is taken beyond the ICU. EVALUATION/OUTCOMES:The importance of the proactive approach by the dedicated RRT nurse was evident in the success of the pilot. Before the pilot, RRT calls averaged 26 calls per month and increased to 115 per month during the pilot. Significantly, 40% of calls resulted from the RRT nurse rounding. The mean number of codes decreased from 0.69 (May 2006 - March 2008) to 0.52 (April 2008 - December 2008). The mortality ratio (observed/expected) decreased from 0.81 (2006) to 0.66 (1st quarter of 2009). Results from a survey showed that 99% of those surveyed agreed the RRT nurse was valuable to staff and patients. Having a dedicated RRT nurse saves lives, promotes teamwork, and empowers nursing.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
26-Oct-2011
Citation:
2010 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 19(3), e15-e28. doi:10.4037/ajcc2010866
Conference Date:
2010
Conference Name:
National Teaching Institute and Critical Care Exposition
Conference Host:
American Association of Critical-Care Nurses
Conference Location:
Washington, D.C., USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMaking an Impact: a Rapid Response Team's (RRT) Proactive Approachen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHicks, Heatheren_GB
dc.contributor.authorMiller, Patriciaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorGreig, Christinaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorDelvecchio, Heidien_GB
dc.author.detailsHeather Hicks, RN,BSN,CCRN, University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Cleveland, Ohio, USA, email: heather8636@yahoo.com; Patricia Miller; Christina Greig; Heidi Delvecchioen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/156997-
dc.description.abstractPURPOSE: In February 2006, our rapid response team (RRT) began having an ICU nurse respond to calls on a medical-surgical division. This role, in addition to caring for ICU patients, stressed the ICU nurse. This stress increased as the program expanded. The solution was to employ a dedicated RRT nurse. As a result, the approach became proactive to optimize the benefits of the RRT: increasing the number of patients seen, decreasing the number of codes and the mortality ratio, and improving overall nursing satisfaction. DESCRIPTION: By October 2006 the program had expanded to all medical-surgical divisions and a dedicated RRT nurse was added to cover nights and weekends. The RRT nurse identified, assessed, and advocated for patients at risk of declining, and responded to patients actively decompensating. The nurse rounded on medical-surgical divisions, assessed patients transferred from the ICU (for 48 hours), and responded to calls. As a result of the dedicated RRT nurse rounding, a significant increase in calls was evident. In addition, the stress felt by the ICU nurse was only alleviated part of the time. Thus, a pilot began in November 2007 with a dedicated RRT nurse 24/7. The number of ICU transfer patients seen, calls, reason for the call, and the disposition of patient were tracked. Those who initiated the call completed surveys. Having a sole RRT allows for quality nursing support, teaching, promotion of teamwork, advocating for patients and connecting with families. These dynamics help facilitate a healthy work environment. In addition to rounding and responding to calls, the RRT nurse reassesses patients who remain on the division following RRT calls. Driven by patient needs, critical care is taken beyond the ICU. EVALUATION/OUTCOMES:The importance of the proactive approach by the dedicated RRT nurse was evident in the success of the pilot. Before the pilot, RRT calls averaged 26 calls per month and increased to 115 per month during the pilot. Significantly, 40% of calls resulted from the RRT nurse rounding. The mean number of codes decreased from 0.69 (May 2006 - March 2008) to 0.52 (April 2008 - December 2008). The mortality ratio (observed/expected) decreased from 0.81 (2006) to 0.66 (1st quarter of 2009). Results from a survey showed that 99% of those surveyed agreed the RRT nurse was valuable to staff and patients. Having a dedicated RRT nurse saves lives, promotes teamwork, and empowers nursing.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:19:46Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-26en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:19:46Z-
dc.identifier.citation2010 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 19(3), e15-e28. doi:10.4037/ajcc2010866en_GB
dc.conference.date2010en_GB
dc.conference.nameNational Teaching Institute and Critical Care Expositionen_GB
dc.conference.hostAmerican Association of Critical-Care Nursesen_GB
dc.conference.locationWashington, D.C., USAen_GB
dc.identifier.citation2010 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 19(3), e15-e28. doi:10.4037/ajcc2010866en_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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