2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157000
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Moral Distress: Supporting Nurses during Patient & Family Conflict
Author(s):
Krupp, Anna
Author Details:
Anna Krupp, RN,MS,CCRN,CCNS, University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics, Madison, Wisconsin, USA, email: akrupp@uwhealth.org
Abstract:
PURPOSE: Addressing moral distress is necessary in creating a healthy work environment. The purpose of our unit-based moral distress initiative included (1) addressing the definition of moral distress and the impact on a healthy work environment, (2) assisting nurses in identifying sources and symptoms of moral distress, and (3) identifying resources to assist with coping during distressing situations. DESCRIPTION: A particularly challenging end-of-life situation within a 24-bed medical, surgical, trauma ICU had a profound impact on the interdisciplinary team. A clear need for staff resources to assist with moral distress identification, coping, and prevention was identified by individuals involved in this case. A team consisting of the unit-based clinical nurse manager, patient care coordinator, clinical nurse specialist (CNS), medical director, and social work met with the psychiatric-liaison CNS and chaplain to develop a moral distress initiative. AACN's 4 A's of Moral Distress Tool was used to develop an introductory nursing focused educational program which was presented at the organizationÆs Nursing Grand Rounds series. Resources were identified and an algorithm was developed to assist nurses with recognizing moral distress triggers and appropriate resources to contact for a variety of distressing situations. Future initiatives to support the moral distress initiative include additional education, such as specific moral distress workshops for care team leaders (charge nurses) and unit-based nurses, which are planned for spring 2010. EVALUATION/OUTCOMES:Staff found the initial educational program validated emotions and challenges they commonly faced. As a result of the situation that occurred on our unit, the organization's ethics committee has since instituted a 24/7 call system with prompt response. In subsequent cases, there has been a more timely gathering of the interdisciplinary team, ethics committee consultation, and legal consult. A moral distress survey was distributed before the educational program, and will be repeated after the additional spring 2010 education to compare unit-based nursing perceptions related to resources and support during morally distressing situation.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
26-Oct-2011
Citation:
2010 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 19(3), e15-e28. doi:10.4037/ajcc2010866
Conference Date:
2010
Conference Name:
National Teaching Institute and Critical Care Exposition
Conference Host:
American Association of Critical-Care Nurses
Conference Location:
Washington, D.C., USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMoral Distress: Supporting Nurses during Patient & Family Conflicten_GB
dc.contributor.authorKrupp, Annaen_GB
dc.author.detailsAnna Krupp, RN,MS,CCRN,CCNS, University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics, Madison, Wisconsin, USA, email: akrupp@uwhealth.orgen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157000-
dc.description.abstractPURPOSE: Addressing moral distress is necessary in creating a healthy work environment. The purpose of our unit-based moral distress initiative included (1) addressing the definition of moral distress and the impact on a healthy work environment, (2) assisting nurses in identifying sources and symptoms of moral distress, and (3) identifying resources to assist with coping during distressing situations. DESCRIPTION: A particularly challenging end-of-life situation within a 24-bed medical, surgical, trauma ICU had a profound impact on the interdisciplinary team. A clear need for staff resources to assist with moral distress identification, coping, and prevention was identified by individuals involved in this case. A team consisting of the unit-based clinical nurse manager, patient care coordinator, clinical nurse specialist (CNS), medical director, and social work met with the psychiatric-liaison CNS and chaplain to develop a moral distress initiative. AACN's 4 A's of Moral Distress Tool was used to develop an introductory nursing focused educational program which was presented at the organizationÆs Nursing Grand Rounds series. Resources were identified and an algorithm was developed to assist nurses with recognizing moral distress triggers and appropriate resources to contact for a variety of distressing situations. Future initiatives to support the moral distress initiative include additional education, such as specific moral distress workshops for care team leaders (charge nurses) and unit-based nurses, which are planned for spring 2010. EVALUATION/OUTCOMES:Staff found the initial educational program validated emotions and challenges they commonly faced. As a result of the situation that occurred on our unit, the organization's ethics committee has since instituted a 24/7 call system with prompt response. In subsequent cases, there has been a more timely gathering of the interdisciplinary team, ethics committee consultation, and legal consult. A moral distress survey was distributed before the educational program, and will be repeated after the additional spring 2010 education to compare unit-based nursing perceptions related to resources and support during morally distressing situation.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:19:55Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-26en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:19:55Z-
dc.identifier.citation2010 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 19(3), e15-e28. doi:10.4037/ajcc2010866en_GB
dc.conference.date2010en_GB
dc.conference.nameNational Teaching Institute and Critical Care Expositionen_GB
dc.conference.hostAmerican Association of Critical-Care Nursesen_GB
dc.conference.locationWashington, D.C., USAen_GB
dc.identifier.citation2010 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 19(3), e15-e28. doi:10.4037/ajcc2010866en_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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