11.00
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157002
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Get Bundled Up: Interventions to Prevent Catheter Associated Urinary Tract Infections
Author(s):
Lawal, Oluwaseyi A.; Alderton, Elizabeth; Fullwood, Joyce
Author Details:
Oluwaseyi A. Lawal, Oluwaseyi, RN, Duke University Health System, Durham, North Carolina, USA, email: shylaw317@hotmail.com; Elizabeth Alderton; Joyce Fullwood
Abstract:
PURPOSE: Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are the most common type of hospital-acquired infections, with 80% being attributable to indwelling urethral catheters. Catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTIs) affect patient comfort, cost of care, and length of stay. Moreover, the centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services will no longer reimburse cost for health care - related CAUTIs. The goal of this project was to develop and implement an evidence-based intervention aimed at reducing the rate of CAUTIs. DESCRIPTION: Baseline data were collected showing the rate of catheter insertions on our unit and the documented numbers of CAUTIs. Unit wide audits were performed using an analytical audit tool to collect information such as date of catheter insertion, reason for initial placement, and continued use. The average length of time catheters remained was 9 days and approximately one-half of the patients with catheters inserted had positive urinary cultures. In addition, the majority of patients transferred out of the ICU still had their catheters in place. We took a multidisciplinary approach involving nurses, patients, families, and physicians in the implementation of the CAUTI bundle. Interventions included, but were not limited to, a zero tolerance policy for hand washing and documentation of indwelling catheter care every shift. An informational bulletin board described the CAUTI bundle and results of unit-specific data. A Power Point presentation developed by members of the unit Performance Improvement Committee was shared with the staff. In addition, one-on-one teaching of the CAUTI bundle was implemented. EVALUATION/OUTCOMES:Our ICU now has a well articulated plan of action for prevention of CAUTIs. There is an increase in nursing staff awareness and continued education as evidenced by an increase in charting of indwelling catheter care every shift. The need for continued use of indwelling catheters is now discussed during patient care rounds. Bladder scanners are available hospital wide for patient assessments. We plan to continue to collect data and compare to baseline data of rates of CAUTIs before and after the initiation of this project. Our future goals also include collaborating with a newly formed hospital wide committee focused on urinary tract infections, and to share and expand our program.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
26-Oct-2011
Citation:
2010 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 19(3), e15-e28. doi:10.4037/ajcc2010866
Conference Date:
2010
Conference Name:
National Teaching Institute and Critical Care Exposition
Conference Host:
American Association of Critical-Care Nurses
Conference Location:
Washington, D.C., USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleGet Bundled Up: Interventions to Prevent Catheter Associated Urinary Tract Infectionsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorLawal, Oluwaseyi A.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorAlderton, Elizabethen_GB
dc.contributor.authorFullwood, Joyceen_GB
dc.author.detailsOluwaseyi A. Lawal, Oluwaseyi, RN, Duke University Health System, Durham, North Carolina, USA, email: shylaw317@hotmail.com; Elizabeth Alderton; Joyce Fullwooden_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157002-
dc.description.abstractPURPOSE: Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are the most common type of hospital-acquired infections, with 80% being attributable to indwelling urethral catheters. Catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTIs) affect patient comfort, cost of care, and length of stay. Moreover, the centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services will no longer reimburse cost for health care - related CAUTIs. The goal of this project was to develop and implement an evidence-based intervention aimed at reducing the rate of CAUTIs. DESCRIPTION: Baseline data were collected showing the rate of catheter insertions on our unit and the documented numbers of CAUTIs. Unit wide audits were performed using an analytical audit tool to collect information such as date of catheter insertion, reason for initial placement, and continued use. The average length of time catheters remained was 9 days and approximately one-half of the patients with catheters inserted had positive urinary cultures. In addition, the majority of patients transferred out of the ICU still had their catheters in place. We took a multidisciplinary approach involving nurses, patients, families, and physicians in the implementation of the CAUTI bundle. Interventions included, but were not limited to, a zero tolerance policy for hand washing and documentation of indwelling catheter care every shift. An informational bulletin board described the CAUTI bundle and results of unit-specific data. A Power Point presentation developed by members of the unit Performance Improvement Committee was shared with the staff. In addition, one-on-one teaching of the CAUTI bundle was implemented. EVALUATION/OUTCOMES:Our ICU now has a well articulated plan of action for prevention of CAUTIs. There is an increase in nursing staff awareness and continued education as evidenced by an increase in charting of indwelling catheter care every shift. The need for continued use of indwelling catheters is now discussed during patient care rounds. Bladder scanners are available hospital wide for patient assessments. We plan to continue to collect data and compare to baseline data of rates of CAUTIs before and after the initiation of this project. Our future goals also include collaborating with a newly formed hospital wide committee focused on urinary tract infections, and to share and expand our program.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:20:02Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-26en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:20:02Z-
dc.identifier.citation2010 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 19(3), e15-e28. doi:10.4037/ajcc2010866en_GB
dc.conference.date2010en_GB
dc.conference.nameNational Teaching Institute and Critical Care Expositionen_GB
dc.conference.hostAmerican Association of Critical-Care Nursesen_GB
dc.conference.locationWashington, D.C., USAen_GB
dc.identifier.citation2010 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 19(3), e15-e28. doi:10.4037/ajcc2010866en_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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