2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157003
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Operationalizing Core Measures and EBP for Undergraduate Critical Care Nursing Students
Author(s):
Leasure, Angela R.; Lu, Shu Hua
Author Details:
Angela R. Leasure, RN,CNS,APRN,PhD,CCRN, University of Oklahoma College of Nursing, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, USA, email: renee-leasure@ouhsc.edu; Shu Hua Lu
Abstract:
PURPOSE: Public access to outcomes data and the emergence of pay for performance initiatives are driving initiatives such as "ventilator bundles," surgical care improvement, and AMI pathways across critical care settings. Nursing education and nursing practice are placing increased emphasis on evidence-based practice (EBP) and the associated link to patient outcomes. DESCRIPTION: The primary purpose of this academic-practice partnership was to introduce students to the EBPs and then linking to the structure-process-outcomes model of quality. Students complete a class assignment before graduation, which examines the evidence underlying a health practice and an organizational analysis that focuses on an organizational process. The practice-based quality specialist helped identify discrete elements of core measures that were of interest to the specific critical care area. Students' health information literacy skills were enhanced through group and individual training in searching databases such as OVID, EMBASE, and EBSCO. The faculty then guided student groups through evidence appraisal and translation into practice recommendations. During a 140-hour clinical leadership rotation, student, and preceptor groups identified barriers to successful implementation. The project was made more real when performance measures coordinators and service directors provided unit level outcomes data as well as target goals. Example of projects and associated initiatives include obtaining an electrocardiogram within 10 minutes of entry (AMI), elevating the head of bed to 30 degree (ventilator-associated pneumonia), and reducing blood culture contamination rates. EVALUATION/OUTCOMES:This collaborative project helped faculty identify projects of value to the clinical setting which in turn were more valued by students. Clinical leaders benefited as many of these students became employees and were aware of the significance of process improvement activities. In its fifth year, this work-in-progress continues to improve based upon feedback from both students and colleagues.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
26-Oct-2011
Citation:
2010 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 19(3), e15-e28. doi:10.4037/ajcc2010866
Conference Date:
2010
Conference Name:
National Teaching Institute and Critical Care Exposition
Conference Host:
American Association of Critical-Care Nurses
Conference Location:
Washington, D.C., USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleOperationalizing Core Measures and EBP for Undergraduate Critical Care Nursing Studentsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorLeasure, Angela R.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorLu, Shu Huaen_GB
dc.author.detailsAngela R. Leasure, RN,CNS,APRN,PhD,CCRN, University of Oklahoma College of Nursing, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, USA, email: renee-leasure@ouhsc.edu; Shu Hua Luen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157003-
dc.description.abstractPURPOSE: Public access to outcomes data and the emergence of pay for performance initiatives are driving initiatives such as "ventilator bundles," surgical care improvement, and AMI pathways across critical care settings. Nursing education and nursing practice are placing increased emphasis on evidence-based practice (EBP) and the associated link to patient outcomes. DESCRIPTION: The primary purpose of this academic-practice partnership was to introduce students to the EBPs and then linking to the structure-process-outcomes model of quality. Students complete a class assignment before graduation, which examines the evidence underlying a health practice and an organizational analysis that focuses on an organizational process. The practice-based quality specialist helped identify discrete elements of core measures that were of interest to the specific critical care area. Students' health information literacy skills were enhanced through group and individual training in searching databases such as OVID, EMBASE, and EBSCO. The faculty then guided student groups through evidence appraisal and translation into practice recommendations. During a 140-hour clinical leadership rotation, student, and preceptor groups identified barriers to successful implementation. The project was made more real when performance measures coordinators and service directors provided unit level outcomes data as well as target goals. Example of projects and associated initiatives include obtaining an electrocardiogram within 10 minutes of entry (AMI), elevating the head of bed to 30 degree (ventilator-associated pneumonia), and reducing blood culture contamination rates. EVALUATION/OUTCOMES:This collaborative project helped faculty identify projects of value to the clinical setting which in turn were more valued by students. Clinical leaders benefited as many of these students became employees and were aware of the significance of process improvement activities. In its fifth year, this work-in-progress continues to improve based upon feedback from both students and colleagues.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:20:06Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-26en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:20:06Z-
dc.identifier.citation2010 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 19(3), e15-e28. doi:10.4037/ajcc2010866en_GB
dc.conference.date2010en_GB
dc.conference.nameNational Teaching Institute and Critical Care Expositionen_GB
dc.conference.hostAmerican Association of Critical-Care Nursesen_GB
dc.conference.locationWashington, D.C., USAen_GB
dc.identifier.citation2010 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 19(3), e15-e28. doi:10.4037/ajcc2010866en_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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