2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157004
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Critical Care Nurses' Knowledge and Perception of Fever Assessment and Management
Author(s):
Leaton, Mary Beth H.
Author Details:
Mary Beth H. Leaton, APRN,MS,CCRN, Morristown Memorial Hospital, Morrsitown, New Jersey, USA, email: leatonmb@optonline.net
Abstract:
POSTER PURPOSE: To understand critical care nursesÆ perceptions and knowledge of fever, including the definition of fever, use of protocols, interventions and rationale, methods of temperature measurement, and need for cultures. BACKGROUND/SIGNIFICANCE:Essential to critical care nursing practice is measurement of body temperature and identification of fever, yet little is known about nurses' perception and knowledge of temperature measurement, fever assessment, and fever management. National and regional trends of fever management practices by neuroscience nurses were identified through a survey of members of AANN. Only 12% of respondents used a nonspecific patient fever protocol. METHOD: We used a descriptive, exploratory design to study nurses' perceptions with a survey developed from a review of the literature and content experts confirming minimal content validity. The sample consisted of registered nurses working in a variety of critical care units at 2 hospitals in northern New Jersey and members of New Jersey chapters of the American Association of Critical-Care Nurses (AACN). RESULTS: A total of 25 nurses identified fever as a specific temperature, 23 offered a verbal explanation, and 5 nurses answered with a combination of a specific temperature and verbal explanation. The next most common explanation focused on the body's response to a variety of situations including infection, bacteria, fungus, a virus, inflammation, or increased temperature. The most common method for monitoring patientsÆ temperature in practice settings of respondents was the oral route (n = 17), followed by use of the tympanic membrane (n = 12) and axilla (n = 11). Twenty-five respondents identified patient's body temperature as the major determinant for cultures. The most frequent temperature cited was >38.5 degrees C. CONCLUSIONS: Most nurses associate fever with an infective process that requires cultures to be obtained. Body temperature is most often measured by the oral and tympanic route, yet these routes were not identified as being the most accurate. Most nurses in this study managed fever by a variety of interventions not based on a protocol. The findings from this study support the need for education and integration of clinical practice guidelines regarding fever assessment and management.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
26-Oct-2011
Citation:
2010 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 19(3), e15-e28. doi:10.4037/ajcc2010866
Conference Date:
2010
Conference Name:
National Teaching Institute and Critical Care Exposition
Conference Host:
American Association of Critical-Care Nurses
Conference Location:
Washington, D.C., USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCritical Care Nurses' Knowledge and Perception of Fever Assessment and Managementen_GB
dc.contributor.authorLeaton, Mary Beth H.en_GB
dc.author.detailsMary Beth H. Leaton, APRN,MS,CCRN, Morristown Memorial Hospital, Morrsitown, New Jersey, USA, email: leatonmb@optonline.neten_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157004-
dc.description.abstractPOSTER PURPOSE: To understand critical care nursesÆ perceptions and knowledge of fever, including the definition of fever, use of protocols, interventions and rationale, methods of temperature measurement, and need for cultures. BACKGROUND/SIGNIFICANCE:Essential to critical care nursing practice is measurement of body temperature and identification of fever, yet little is known about nurses' perception and knowledge of temperature measurement, fever assessment, and fever management. National and regional trends of fever management practices by neuroscience nurses were identified through a survey of members of AANN. Only 12% of respondents used a nonspecific patient fever protocol. METHOD: We used a descriptive, exploratory design to study nurses' perceptions with a survey developed from a review of the literature and content experts confirming minimal content validity. The sample consisted of registered nurses working in a variety of critical care units at 2 hospitals in northern New Jersey and members of New Jersey chapters of the American Association of Critical-Care Nurses (AACN). RESULTS: A total of 25 nurses identified fever as a specific temperature, 23 offered a verbal explanation, and 5 nurses answered with a combination of a specific temperature and verbal explanation. The next most common explanation focused on the body's response to a variety of situations including infection, bacteria, fungus, a virus, inflammation, or increased temperature. The most common method for monitoring patientsÆ temperature in practice settings of respondents was the oral route (n = 17), followed by use of the tympanic membrane (n = 12) and axilla (n = 11). Twenty-five respondents identified patient's body temperature as the major determinant for cultures. The most frequent temperature cited was >38.5 degrees C. CONCLUSIONS: Most nurses associate fever with an infective process that requires cultures to be obtained. Body temperature is most often measured by the oral and tympanic route, yet these routes were not identified as being the most accurate. Most nurses in this study managed fever by a variety of interventions not based on a protocol. The findings from this study support the need for education and integration of clinical practice guidelines regarding fever assessment and management.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:20:09Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-26en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:20:09Z-
dc.identifier.citation2010 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 19(3), e15-e28. doi:10.4037/ajcc2010866en_GB
dc.conference.date2010en_GB
dc.conference.nameNational Teaching Institute and Critical Care Expositionen_GB
dc.conference.hostAmerican Association of Critical-Care Nursesen_GB
dc.conference.locationWashington, D.C., USAen_GB
dc.identifier.citation2010 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 19(3), e15-e28. doi:10.4037/ajcc2010866en_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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