Impact of High Frequency Chest Wall Oscillation and Chest Physiotherapy on Lung Function After Lung Transplantation

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157005
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Impact of High Frequency Chest Wall Oscillation and Chest Physiotherapy on Lung Function After Lung Transplantation
Author(s):
Lee, Aia Jina; Ilagan-Honorio, Monina; Madsen, Ashley; Porter, Julia; Gonzalez, Angeli Paula; Rodman, Betty; Marcarian, Taline; Villamor, Filma; Mayol-ngo, Kristina
Author Details:
Aia Jina Lee, RN,ADN,AA, University of California, Los Angeles Health System, Los Angeles, California, USA, email: leeaijin@gmail.com; Monina ILagan-Honorio; Ashley Madsen; Julia Porter; Angeli Paula Gonzalez; Betty Rodman; Taline Marcarian; Filma Villamor; Kristina Mayol-ngo
Abstract:
POSTER PURPOSE: To examine differences between the effects of high-frequency chest wall oscillation (HFCWO) and chest physiotherapy (CPT) on lung function (dyspnea, peak expiratory flow [PEF], and SpO2/FIO2 ratio) in lung transplant recipients. BACKGROUND/SIGNIFICANCE:Prior studies demonstrated HFCWO to be as effective in clearing secretions as CPT in patients with chronic pulmonary disease. Existing evidence is based largely on experimental studies with cystic fibrosis patients. It is unclear whether one of these treatments is more effective than the other on physiological indices of lung function. Subjective assessment of dyspnea may be as important as objective indices of lung function (eg, PEF) to determine airflow limitations after lung transplantation. METHOD: In a 2-group experimental, repeated-measures design, 37 lung transplant recipients (21 single lung transplants [SLTs], 16 bilateral lung transplants [BLTs], 70% male, mean age 57 [SD, 12.97] years) were randomized to CPT (10 AM, 2 PM) followed by HFCWO (6 PM, 10 PM; n = 18) or vice versa (n = 19) on postoperative day 3. Pretreatment and posttreatment measures were dyspnea (modified Borg score), SpO2/FIO2 ratio, and PEF. Data were analyzed by 2 analysis, t test, and mixed analysis of variance. RESULTS: Patients receiving BLTs were significantly younger than patients receiving SLTs (mean, 48; SD, 13.5 vs mean, 65; SD, 5.4 years, P < .001). Pretreatment vs posttreatment dyspnea scores were significantly lower in patients who received HFCWO vs CPT at the 10 AM time point (P = .05). Mean posttreatment dyspnea scores decreased from 10 AM to 6 PM time points with both treatment methods (P = .03). PEF scores and SpO2/FIO2 ratio at 10 AM did not differ significantly from before to after treatment. A steady increase in posttreatment PEF scores occurred across time points (P < .001). A significant interaction was found between type of lung transplant and time point; SLT and BLT recipients had the highest post-treatment PEF scores at 6 PM and 10 PM, respectively (P = .03). CONCLUSIONS: Findings of this study suggest improved lung function (dyspnea and PEF) with both CPT and HFCWO after lung transplantation. At the first time point, dyspnea was improved among patients who received HFCWO compared with CPT. We speculate that HFCWO is an effective, feasible alternative to CPT. Further study of both methods is warranted to evaluate improvement in lung function outcomes for this population.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
26-Oct-2011
Citation:
2010 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 19(3), e15-e28. doi:10.4037/ajcc2010866
Conference Date:
2010
Conference Name:
National Teaching Institute and Critical Care Exposition
Conference Host:
American Association of Critical-Care Nurses
Conference Location:
Washington, D.C., USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleImpact of High Frequency Chest Wall Oscillation and Chest Physiotherapy on Lung Function After Lung Transplantationen_GB
dc.contributor.authorLee, Aia Jinaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorIlagan-Honorio, Moninaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMadsen, Ashleyen_GB
dc.contributor.authorPorter, Juliaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorGonzalez, Angeli Paulaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorRodman, Bettyen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMarcarian, Talineen_GB
dc.contributor.authorVillamor, Filmaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMayol-ngo, Kristinaen_GB
dc.author.detailsAia Jina Lee, RN,ADN,AA, University of California, Los Angeles Health System, Los Angeles, California, USA, email: leeaijin@gmail.com; Monina ILagan-Honorio; Ashley Madsen; Julia Porter; Angeli Paula Gonzalez; Betty Rodman; Taline Marcarian; Filma Villamor; Kristina Mayol-ngoen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157005-
dc.description.abstractPOSTER PURPOSE: To examine differences between the effects of high-frequency chest wall oscillation (HFCWO) and chest physiotherapy (CPT) on lung function (dyspnea, peak expiratory flow [PEF], and SpO2/FIO2 ratio) in lung transplant recipients. BACKGROUND/SIGNIFICANCE:Prior studies demonstrated HFCWO to be as effective in clearing secretions as CPT in patients with chronic pulmonary disease. Existing evidence is based largely on experimental studies with cystic fibrosis patients. It is unclear whether one of these treatments is more effective than the other on physiological indices of lung function. Subjective assessment of dyspnea may be as important as objective indices of lung function (eg, PEF) to determine airflow limitations after lung transplantation. METHOD: In a 2-group experimental, repeated-measures design, 37 lung transplant recipients (21 single lung transplants [SLTs], 16 bilateral lung transplants [BLTs], 70% male, mean age 57 [SD, 12.97] years) were randomized to CPT (10 AM, 2 PM) followed by HFCWO (6 PM, 10 PM; n = 18) or vice versa (n = 19) on postoperative day 3. Pretreatment and posttreatment measures were dyspnea (modified Borg score), SpO2/FIO2 ratio, and PEF. Data were analyzed by 2 analysis, t test, and mixed analysis of variance. RESULTS: Patients receiving BLTs were significantly younger than patients receiving SLTs (mean, 48; SD, 13.5 vs mean, 65; SD, 5.4 years, P < .001). Pretreatment vs posttreatment dyspnea scores were significantly lower in patients who received HFCWO vs CPT at the 10 AM time point (P = .05). Mean posttreatment dyspnea scores decreased from 10 AM to 6 PM time points with both treatment methods (P = .03). PEF scores and SpO2/FIO2 ratio at 10 AM did not differ significantly from before to after treatment. A steady increase in posttreatment PEF scores occurred across time points (P < .001). A significant interaction was found between type of lung transplant and time point; SLT and BLT recipients had the highest post-treatment PEF scores at 6 PM and 10 PM, respectively (P = .03). CONCLUSIONS: Findings of this study suggest improved lung function (dyspnea and PEF) with both CPT and HFCWO after lung transplantation. At the first time point, dyspnea was improved among patients who received HFCWO compared with CPT. We speculate that HFCWO is an effective, feasible alternative to CPT. Further study of both methods is warranted to evaluate improvement in lung function outcomes for this population.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:20:12Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-26en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:20:12Z-
dc.identifier.citation2010 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 19(3), e15-e28. doi:10.4037/ajcc2010866en_GB
dc.conference.date2010en_GB
dc.conference.nameNational Teaching Institute and Critical Care Expositionen_GB
dc.conference.hostAmerican Association of Critical-Care Nursesen_GB
dc.conference.locationWashington, D.C., USAen_GB
dc.identifier.citation2010 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 19(3), e15-e28. doi:10.4037/ajcc2010866en_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.