2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157008
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Effects of Family Witnessed Resuscitation after Trauma Prior to Hospitalization
Author(s):
Leske, Jane B.
Author Details:
Jane B. Leske, APRN-BC,PhD, University of WI-Milwaukee, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, USA, email: jsl@uwm.edu
Abstract:
POSTER PURPOSE: To examine the effects of family-witnessed resuscitation (FWR) in patients experiencing trauma from motor vehicle crashes and gunshot wounds. The primary aim was to compare the effects of FWR on family strengths (resources, coping, and problem-solving communication) and outcomes (well-being) and to compare those strengths and outcomes in families who witness resuscitation (n=16) with those in families who do not witness resuscitation (n=17) before hospitalization. BACKGROUND/SIGNIFICANCE:Numerous studies have been conducted that examined the effect of FWR after hospitalization. Results suggested that there are benefits for families who witness resuscitation. However, none of these studies included trauma patients or effects of FWR occurring before hospitalization. This study has the potential to bring an understanding to an often neglected and vulnerable population who witness resuscitation by describing if the experience fosters any positive or detrimental family outcomes. METHOD: The Resiliency Model guided the design and selection of variables for this study. Data from a multivariate comparison prior study were used. Family members were asked to participate within 1 to 2 days after admission to critical care. The Family Inventory of Resources for Management measured family resources. The Family Crisis-Oriented Personal Evaluation Scale measured coping. The Family Problem-Solving Communication Index measured problem-solving communication. The Family Member Well-being Index measured family well-being. Descriptive statistics and analysis of covariance were used to answer the research question. RESULTS: Family members of 33 trauma patients (motor vehicle crash, n=19, 57%; gunshot wound, n= 14, 43%) participated in this study. Family members ranged in age from 18 to 61 years old (mean, 35.44; SD, 11.79). Most were female (73%) and African American (58%). Results indicated that scores for family resources (f=.04, P=.84), coping (f =.01, P=.89), problem-solving communication (f=.01, P= .30), and well-being (f=.13, P=.71) were no different in families who witnessed resuscitation than in families who did not witness resuscitation before hospitalization in this study. CONCLUSIONS: The effects of FWR during the prehospital time period are not detrimental to family. However, family members in this study did not have the benefit of a formal policy or procedure. Data were cross-sectional and sample size was small, so the impact of FWR on family strengths and outcomes needs to be examined in further research. The results of this study contribute to the growing body of literature that FWR does not adversely affect family members. The long-term effects of FWR are still unknown.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
26-Oct-2011
Citation:
2010 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 19(3), e15-e28. doi:10.4037/ajcc2010866
Conference Date:
2010
Conference Name:
National Teaching Institute and Critical Care Exposition
Conference Host:
American Association of Critical-Care Nurses
Conference Location:
Washington, D.C., USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEffects of Family Witnessed Resuscitation after Trauma Prior to Hospitalizationen_GB
dc.contributor.authorLeske, Jane B.en_GB
dc.author.detailsJane B. Leske, APRN-BC,PhD, University of WI-Milwaukee, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, USA, email: jsl@uwm.eduen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157008-
dc.description.abstractPOSTER PURPOSE: To examine the effects of family-witnessed resuscitation (FWR) in patients experiencing trauma from motor vehicle crashes and gunshot wounds. The primary aim was to compare the effects of FWR on family strengths (resources, coping, and problem-solving communication) and outcomes (well-being) and to compare those strengths and outcomes in families who witness resuscitation (n=16) with those in families who do not witness resuscitation (n=17) before hospitalization. BACKGROUND/SIGNIFICANCE:Numerous studies have been conducted that examined the effect of FWR after hospitalization. Results suggested that there are benefits for families who witness resuscitation. However, none of these studies included trauma patients or effects of FWR occurring before hospitalization. This study has the potential to bring an understanding to an often neglected and vulnerable population who witness resuscitation by describing if the experience fosters any positive or detrimental family outcomes. METHOD: The Resiliency Model guided the design and selection of variables for this study. Data from a multivariate comparison prior study were used. Family members were asked to participate within 1 to 2 days after admission to critical care. The Family Inventory of Resources for Management measured family resources. The Family Crisis-Oriented Personal Evaluation Scale measured coping. The Family Problem-Solving Communication Index measured problem-solving communication. The Family Member Well-being Index measured family well-being. Descriptive statistics and analysis of covariance were used to answer the research question. RESULTS: Family members of 33 trauma patients (motor vehicle crash, n=19, 57%; gunshot wound, n= 14, 43%) participated in this study. Family members ranged in age from 18 to 61 years old (mean, 35.44; SD, 11.79). Most were female (73%) and African American (58%). Results indicated that scores for family resources (f=.04, P=.84), coping (f =.01, P=.89), problem-solving communication (f=.01, P= .30), and well-being (f=.13, P=.71) were no different in families who witnessed resuscitation than in families who did not witness resuscitation before hospitalization in this study. CONCLUSIONS: The effects of FWR during the prehospital time period are not detrimental to family. However, family members in this study did not have the benefit of a formal policy or procedure. Data were cross-sectional and sample size was small, so the impact of FWR on family strengths and outcomes needs to be examined in further research. The results of this study contribute to the growing body of literature that FWR does not adversely affect family members. The long-term effects of FWR are still unknown.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:20:22Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-26en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:20:22Z-
dc.identifier.citation2010 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 19(3), e15-e28. doi:10.4037/ajcc2010866en_GB
dc.conference.date2010en_GB
dc.conference.nameNational Teaching Institute and Critical Care Expositionen_GB
dc.conference.hostAmerican Association of Critical-Care Nursesen_GB
dc.conference.locationWashington, D.C., USAen_GB
dc.identifier.citation2010 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 19(3), e15-e28. doi:10.4037/ajcc2010866en_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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