2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157010
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Green, Yellow, or Red: Follow the Signal To Safely Administer Hazardous Drugs.
Author(s):
Lovasik, Darlene A.; Miller, Sharon; Scholle, Carol
Author Details:
Darlene A. Lovasik, RN,MN,CCRN,CNRN, UPMC Presbyterian, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA, email: lovasikdj@upmc.edu; Sharon Miller; Carol Scholle
Abstract:
PURPOSE: Hazardous drug handling is an acknowledged occupational hazard for critical care nurses; however, using safe handling practices can decrease the risk of preparing and administering hazardous drugs. The National Institute for Occupation Safety and Health (NIOSH) has prepared a list of hazardous drugs that pose a potential health risk to the nurses who may be exposed during medication preparation or administration; however, nursing and pharmacy staffs were not aware of these guidelines. DESCRIPTION: We established a multidisciplinary committee to develop guidelines for a Safe Handling Program that included hazardous drug identification, use of appropriate personal protective equipment (PPE), and appropriate management of spills and waste. Specific information regarding the recommended precautions was prepared by nursing and pharmacy experts (particularly oncology) and is available on the "Infonet," our internal Web site. The drugs are classified as low risk (green), moderate risk (yellow), and high risk (red) and the corresponding PPE recommendations are listed. Using practices that were based on oncology procedures, hazardous drugs are identified, primed in the pharmacy, and administered using safe-handling practices and appropriate PPE. The training program also reviewed hand hygiene after drug-handling activities, appropriate disposal of material contaminated with hazardous drugs, management of accidental exposure, and voluntary medical surveillance. EVALUATION/OUTCOMES:We involved nursing, pharmacy, environment services (housekeeping), central supply service, employee health service, and environmental health and safety to develop a process to implement the NIOSH guidelines, evaluate personal protective equipment (PPE), and prepare a plan to inform health care providers of the NIOSH guidelines. The education program integrated formal inservices, demonstration, posters, and an e-mail campaign. The issues that surfaced included supply demands, noncompliance, and/or inappropriate use of PPE with all levels of personnel, and "trash confusion" with waste disposal.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
26-Oct-2011
Citation:
2010 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 19(3), e15-e28. doi:10.4037/ajcc2010866
Conference Date:
2010
Conference Name:
National Teaching Institute and Critical Care Exposition
Conference Host:
American Association of Critical-Care Nurses
Conference Location:
Washington, D.C., USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleGreen, Yellow, or Red: Follow the Signal To Safely Administer Hazardous Drugs.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorLovasik, Darlene A.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorMiller, Sharonen_GB
dc.contributor.authorScholle, Carolen_GB
dc.author.detailsDarlene A. Lovasik, RN,MN,CCRN,CNRN, UPMC Presbyterian, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA, email: lovasikdj@upmc.edu; Sharon Miller; Carol Scholleen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157010-
dc.description.abstractPURPOSE: Hazardous drug handling is an acknowledged occupational hazard for critical care nurses; however, using safe handling practices can decrease the risk of preparing and administering hazardous drugs. The National Institute for Occupation Safety and Health (NIOSH) has prepared a list of hazardous drugs that pose a potential health risk to the nurses who may be exposed during medication preparation or administration; however, nursing and pharmacy staffs were not aware of these guidelines. DESCRIPTION: We established a multidisciplinary committee to develop guidelines for a Safe Handling Program that included hazardous drug identification, use of appropriate personal protective equipment (PPE), and appropriate management of spills and waste. Specific information regarding the recommended precautions was prepared by nursing and pharmacy experts (particularly oncology) and is available on the "Infonet," our internal Web site. The drugs are classified as low risk (green), moderate risk (yellow), and high risk (red) and the corresponding PPE recommendations are listed. Using practices that were based on oncology procedures, hazardous drugs are identified, primed in the pharmacy, and administered using safe-handling practices and appropriate PPE. The training program also reviewed hand hygiene after drug-handling activities, appropriate disposal of material contaminated with hazardous drugs, management of accidental exposure, and voluntary medical surveillance. EVALUATION/OUTCOMES:We involved nursing, pharmacy, environment services (housekeeping), central supply service, employee health service, and environmental health and safety to develop a process to implement the NIOSH guidelines, evaluate personal protective equipment (PPE), and prepare a plan to inform health care providers of the NIOSH guidelines. The education program integrated formal inservices, demonstration, posters, and an e-mail campaign. The issues that surfaced included supply demands, noncompliance, and/or inappropriate use of PPE with all levels of personnel, and "trash confusion" with waste disposal.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:20:28Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-26en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:20:28Z-
dc.identifier.citation2010 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 19(3), e15-e28. doi:10.4037/ajcc2010866en_GB
dc.conference.date2010en_GB
dc.conference.nameNational Teaching Institute and Critical Care Expositionen_GB
dc.conference.hostAmerican Association of Critical-Care Nursesen_GB
dc.conference.locationWashington, D.C., USAen_GB
dc.identifier.citation2010 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 19(3), e15-e28. doi:10.4037/ajcc2010866en_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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