2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157014
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Can You Hear Me Now? Nursing Presentation During Multidisciplinary Bedside Rounds
Author(s):
Martin, Heidi A.; Nelson, Eileen
Author Details:
Heidi A. Martin, RN,BS,BSN,CNRN, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA, email: martinh@email.chop.edu; Eileen Nelson
Abstract:
PURPOSE: Nurses are usually present during multidisciplinary bedside rounds in our 45-bed pediatric ICU. The degree of participation has been variable. Depending on the level of experience and team culture, the nurse may be viewed as an active team member or as an interested bystander. Consistent nurse presentation during rounds was implemented to increase decision making, facilitate active participation amongst all nurses and improve communication and collaboration amongst the multidisciplinary team. DESCRIPTION: Recognizing the need to improve active participation and decision making, we implemented a system in which each bedside nurse presents his/her patients during daily bedside rounds. Before implementation, data were collected to assess percentage of time nurses were physically present during bedside rounds, identify potential barriers as well as length of rounds. A script was developed with input from nursing and medical staff to guide nurses in presenting patient information/updates clearly and concisely during rounds. The script includes an overview of events/changes over the past twenty four hours and current issues/concerns. Before implementation, many discussions occurred with physicians, nursing leadership and bedside nurses to gain buy-in from each discipline. The physicians' largest concern was that the length of rounds would increase. The script was trialed before full implementation. Night shift nurses prepare the information for the script and day shift nurses update and present the information during daily beside rounds. If the assigned bedside nurse is unable to present the patient's information during rounds, they use their neighbors or plan with charge nurse in an effort to have 100% active participation. EVALUATION/OUTCOMES:A survey was conducted 1 month after implementation. Less experienced nurses reported feeling more empowered and less intimated during rounds. Response from experienced nurses has varied with some reporting no difference in their level of empowerment as they have always felt empowered. Nursing and medical staff both reported rounds occur more smoothly with fewer interruptions and more accurate patient information. Resident physicians report that having nurses' present during rounds has given them the opportunity to improve their knowledge base. Length of rounds varies according to attending; however, data has not shown an increase in length of rounds since implementation.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
26-Oct-2011
Citation:
2010 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 19(3), e15-e28. doi:10.4037/ajcc2010866
Conference Date:
2010
Conference Name:
National Teaching Institute and Critical Care Exposition
Conference Host:
American Association of Critical-Care Nurses
Conference Location:
Washington, D.C., USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCan You Hear Me Now? Nursing Presentation During Multidisciplinary Bedside Roundsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMartin, Heidi A.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorNelson, Eileenen_GB
dc.author.detailsHeidi A. Martin, RN,BS,BSN,CNRN, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA, email: martinh@email.chop.edu; Eileen Nelsonen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157014-
dc.description.abstractPURPOSE: Nurses are usually present during multidisciplinary bedside rounds in our 45-bed pediatric ICU. The degree of participation has been variable. Depending on the level of experience and team culture, the nurse may be viewed as an active team member or as an interested bystander. Consistent nurse presentation during rounds was implemented to increase decision making, facilitate active participation amongst all nurses and improve communication and collaboration amongst the multidisciplinary team. DESCRIPTION: Recognizing the need to improve active participation and decision making, we implemented a system in which each bedside nurse presents his/her patients during daily bedside rounds. Before implementation, data were collected to assess percentage of time nurses were physically present during bedside rounds, identify potential barriers as well as length of rounds. A script was developed with input from nursing and medical staff to guide nurses in presenting patient information/updates clearly and concisely during rounds. The script includes an overview of events/changes over the past twenty four hours and current issues/concerns. Before implementation, many discussions occurred with physicians, nursing leadership and bedside nurses to gain buy-in from each discipline. The physicians' largest concern was that the length of rounds would increase. The script was trialed before full implementation. Night shift nurses prepare the information for the script and day shift nurses update and present the information during daily beside rounds. If the assigned bedside nurse is unable to present the patient's information during rounds, they use their neighbors or plan with charge nurse in an effort to have 100% active participation. EVALUATION/OUTCOMES:A survey was conducted 1 month after implementation. Less experienced nurses reported feeling more empowered and less intimated during rounds. Response from experienced nurses has varied with some reporting no difference in their level of empowerment as they have always felt empowered. Nursing and medical staff both reported rounds occur more smoothly with fewer interruptions and more accurate patient information. Resident physicians report that having nurses' present during rounds has given them the opportunity to improve their knowledge base. Length of rounds varies according to attending; however, data has not shown an increase in length of rounds since implementation.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:20:41Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-26en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:20:41Z-
dc.identifier.citation2010 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 19(3), e15-e28. doi:10.4037/ajcc2010866en_GB
dc.conference.date2010en_GB
dc.conference.nameNational Teaching Institute and Critical Care Expositionen_GB
dc.conference.hostAmerican Association of Critical-Care Nursesen_GB
dc.conference.locationWashington, D.C., USAen_GB
dc.identifier.citation2010 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 19(3), e15-e28. doi:10.4037/ajcc2010866en_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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