2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157018
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Patient and Family Centered Care Starting in the Pre-Operative Phase
Author(s):
McEwen, Sharon R; Stanton, Kevin
Author Details:
Sharon R McEwen, UPMC Shadyside, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA, email: mcewensr@upmc.edu; Kevin Stanton
Abstract:
PURPOSE: Knowing patients and families are at a vulnerable time in their life coming to the hospital with fear of the unknown, the staff of the surgical intensive care unit (SICU) designed a preoperative tour and education program for surgical oncology patients. The goal of the program is to answer questions the patient and family members may have before surgery and to meet the staff that will be taking care of them. The purpose of this project is to increase the knowledge that patients and families have preoperatively by offering tours in the SICU to answer all questions, and begin postoperative teaching. These interventions have the potential to improve patient outcomes. DESCRIPTION: A surgical oncology ICU can prove to be intimidating and a highly stressful environment for patients and families. Most ICU patients are unconscious or incapacitated making it difficult to communicate. In the SICU at UPMC Shadyside, our focus is patient and family-centered care. Most family members are overwhelmed with unfamiliar and often frightening interventions with the outcomes being uncertain. Surgery in most cases is inevitable, thus creating more fear and anxiety for patients and families. The staff in the ICU recognized these fears and wanted patients and families to feel more comfortable in the ICU environment. Knowing this is a stressful time for patients and families, the staff decided they wanted to try to help alleviate some anxieties by answering questions patients had preoperatively. A collaborative effort between the outpatient oncology clinic and the ICU team developed a program for surgical-oncology patients and their families to tour the ICU before surgery. This program has been a huge success. Not only do the patients and families get to tour the unit, they get to meet the nurses who will be taking care of them. Availability is made by staff to answer all their questions. Teaching is also started at this time. Discussions are held regarding pain management, coughing and deep breathing techniques, and sounds of the ICU. After the tour of the ICU is complete, a tour is given of the unit they will transfer to, after their ICU stay. Staff has also developed a handbook called "Welcome to the ICU." This detailed book covers the whole ICU stay including a glossary of terms. Also included in the book are places for families to stay and a map of the city. The surgical ICU team has a commitment to quality and respect for persons in the ICU. Giving patients and families the opportunity to make choices about many aspects of their care and the care delivery process has been a huge patient and family satisfier. Developing relationships based on mutual respect, trust, open honest communication and integrity ensures quality care delivery. Having an understanding and respecting patientsÆ cultural traditions, their personal preferences and values, their family situations and their lifestyles have improved patient outcomes. Involving patients and their loved ones as part of the care team, collaborating with health care professionals in making clinical decisions make patients and families feel as if they have some sense of control. Surveys are given to patients prior to leaving the ICU unit to ensure all needs have been met. Our commitment to quality and excellence to patients and families achieves positive patient outcomes. EVALUATION/OUTCOMES:A survey is given to the patient/family before leaving the SICU. The results of the surveys have been positive with comments reflecting that some of the preoperative anxieties had been alleviated. Families are comfortable knowing where the lounge is, what the visiting hours are, and what to expect the day of surgery. Patient- and family-centered care ensures that transitions between providers, departments, and health care settings are respectful, coordinated, and efficient.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
26-Oct-2011
Citation:
2010 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 19(3), e15-e28. doi:10.4037/ajcc2010866
Conference Date:
2010
Conference Name:
National Teaching Institute and Critical Care Exposition
Conference Host:
American Association of Critical-Care Nurses
Conference Location:
Washington, D.C., USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePatient and Family Centered Care Starting in the Pre-Operative Phaseen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMcEwen, Sharon Ren_GB
dc.contributor.authorStanton, Kevinen_GB
dc.author.detailsSharon R McEwen, UPMC Shadyside, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA, email: mcewensr@upmc.edu; Kevin Stantonen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157018-
dc.description.abstractPURPOSE: Knowing patients and families are at a vulnerable time in their life coming to the hospital with fear of the unknown, the staff of the surgical intensive care unit (SICU) designed a preoperative tour and education program for surgical oncology patients. The goal of the program is to answer questions the patient and family members may have before surgery and to meet the staff that will be taking care of them. The purpose of this project is to increase the knowledge that patients and families have preoperatively by offering tours in the SICU to answer all questions, and begin postoperative teaching. These interventions have the potential to improve patient outcomes. DESCRIPTION: A surgical oncology ICU can prove to be intimidating and a highly stressful environment for patients and families. Most ICU patients are unconscious or incapacitated making it difficult to communicate. In the SICU at UPMC Shadyside, our focus is patient and family-centered care. Most family members are overwhelmed with unfamiliar and often frightening interventions with the outcomes being uncertain. Surgery in most cases is inevitable, thus creating more fear and anxiety for patients and families. The staff in the ICU recognized these fears and wanted patients and families to feel more comfortable in the ICU environment. Knowing this is a stressful time for patients and families, the staff decided they wanted to try to help alleviate some anxieties by answering questions patients had preoperatively. A collaborative effort between the outpatient oncology clinic and the ICU team developed a program for surgical-oncology patients and their families to tour the ICU before surgery. This program has been a huge success. Not only do the patients and families get to tour the unit, they get to meet the nurses who will be taking care of them. Availability is made by staff to answer all their questions. Teaching is also started at this time. Discussions are held regarding pain management, coughing and deep breathing techniques, and sounds of the ICU. After the tour of the ICU is complete, a tour is given of the unit they will transfer to, after their ICU stay. Staff has also developed a handbook called "Welcome to the ICU." This detailed book covers the whole ICU stay including a glossary of terms. Also included in the book are places for families to stay and a map of the city. The surgical ICU team has a commitment to quality and respect for persons in the ICU. Giving patients and families the opportunity to make choices about many aspects of their care and the care delivery process has been a huge patient and family satisfier. Developing relationships based on mutual respect, trust, open honest communication and integrity ensures quality care delivery. Having an understanding and respecting patientsÆ cultural traditions, their personal preferences and values, their family situations and their lifestyles have improved patient outcomes. Involving patients and their loved ones as part of the care team, collaborating with health care professionals in making clinical decisions make patients and families feel as if they have some sense of control. Surveys are given to patients prior to leaving the ICU unit to ensure all needs have been met. Our commitment to quality and excellence to patients and families achieves positive patient outcomes. EVALUATION/OUTCOMES:A survey is given to the patient/family before leaving the SICU. The results of the surveys have been positive with comments reflecting that some of the preoperative anxieties had been alleviated. Families are comfortable knowing where the lounge is, what the visiting hours are, and what to expect the day of surgery. Patient- and family-centered care ensures that transitions between providers, departments, and health care settings are respectful, coordinated, and efficient.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:20:54Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-26en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:20:54Z-
dc.identifier.citation2010 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 19(3), e15-e28. doi:10.4037/ajcc2010866en_GB
dc.conference.date2010en_GB
dc.conference.nameNational Teaching Institute and Critical Care Expositionen_GB
dc.conference.hostAmerican Association of Critical-Care Nursesen_GB
dc.conference.locationWashington, D.C., USAen_GB
dc.identifier.citation2010 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 19(3), e15-e28. doi:10.4037/ajcc2010866en_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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