Patients and Families at the Center of Care Delivery-Relationship Based Care (RBC) Within the Critical Care Environment

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157019
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Patients and Families at the Center of Care Delivery-Relationship Based Care (RBC) Within the Critical Care Environment
Author(s):
Morris, Sherri A.; Hughes, Jenniffer; McCann, Meghan; Maisano, Deirdre; Johnson, Emily
Author Details:
Sherri A. Morris, RN,ASN,AA,CCRN, UNC Healthcare, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA, email: s.morris@prodigy.net; Jenniffer Hughes; Meghan McCann; Deirdre Maisano; Emily Johnson
Abstract:
PURPOSE: Families are typically not allowed at bedsides for a long period in ICUs. Visitation often depends on nursing comfort level with family. The culture of relationship-based care (RBC) was adopted in the CTICU to decrease patient anxiety, include patient input into plan of care, and increase overall patient satisfaction. The goal was to create an environment in which families felt comfortable to participate with care, be present during procedures or codes, and build a trusting relationship with caregivers. DESCRIPTION: A core group of staff nurses who felt passionate about RBC took the initiative to spearhead the project. To establish baseline knowledge about RBC, surveys were distributed to all CTICU staff including support staff regarding: "What is RBC and what does it mean to you?" Interviews were performed to allow for more detailed feedback. Evidence was then presented to staff from IHI, Institute for Family Care, SCCM, and AACN with the history and benefits of RBC. The leadership teams in the CTICU at UNC Healthcare led the effort with a consistent united front. Open visitation guidelines were established for staff and visitors. Quit Taking It Personally (QTIP) was used to remind staff to always do what is best for the patients first. Staff is discouraged from blaming RBC for inappropriate behavior in the unit. Families are taught simple basic care tasks so they are active participants in the care of their loved ones. Families and patients are included in rounds with physicians and shift report. The manager rounds daily with patients and families to ensure their needs are consistently met. The entire interdisciplinary team has embraced the idea once members experienced the positive results and feedback from families. EVALUATION/OUTCOMES:Methods used for evaluation 1 year after initiation of RBC in the CTICU: direct observation, interviews, and discharge satisfaction surveys. Patients and families have verbalized their comfort level in knowing they can take a break away from the unit and come back anytime. Patients feel included in the care and constantly informed of the plan of care with bedside reporting. There has also been an increase in satisfaction of CTICU care on discharge surveys. The paradigm shift of RBC has led to other initiatives in the CTICU. RBC ultimately promotes a safer environment for patients and a higher level of professionalism within the unit as evidenced by achievement of Beacon Award.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
26-Oct-2011
Citation:
2010 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 19(3), e15-e28. doi:10.4037/ajcc2010866
Conference Date:
2010
Conference Name:
National Teaching Institute and Critical Care Exposition
Conference Host:
American Association of Critical-Care Nurses
Conference Location:
Washington, D.C., USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePatients and Families at the Center of Care Delivery-Relationship Based Care (RBC) Within the Critical Care Environmenten_GB
dc.contributor.authorMorris, Sherri A.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorHughes, Jennifferen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMcCann, Meghanen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMaisano, Deirdreen_GB
dc.contributor.authorJohnson, Emilyen_GB
dc.author.detailsSherri A. Morris, RN,ASN,AA,CCRN, UNC Healthcare, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA, email: s.morris@prodigy.net; Jenniffer Hughes; Meghan McCann; Deirdre Maisano; Emily Johnsonen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157019-
dc.description.abstractPURPOSE: Families are typically not allowed at bedsides for a long period in ICUs. Visitation often depends on nursing comfort level with family. The culture of relationship-based care (RBC) was adopted in the CTICU to decrease patient anxiety, include patient input into plan of care, and increase overall patient satisfaction. The goal was to create an environment in which families felt comfortable to participate with care, be present during procedures or codes, and build a trusting relationship with caregivers. DESCRIPTION: A core group of staff nurses who felt passionate about RBC took the initiative to spearhead the project. To establish baseline knowledge about RBC, surveys were distributed to all CTICU staff including support staff regarding: "What is RBC and what does it mean to you?" Interviews were performed to allow for more detailed feedback. Evidence was then presented to staff from IHI, Institute for Family Care, SCCM, and AACN with the history and benefits of RBC. The leadership teams in the CTICU at UNC Healthcare led the effort with a consistent united front. Open visitation guidelines were established for staff and visitors. Quit Taking It Personally (QTIP) was used to remind staff to always do what is best for the patients first. Staff is discouraged from blaming RBC for inappropriate behavior in the unit. Families are taught simple basic care tasks so they are active participants in the care of their loved ones. Families and patients are included in rounds with physicians and shift report. The manager rounds daily with patients and families to ensure their needs are consistently met. The entire interdisciplinary team has embraced the idea once members experienced the positive results and feedback from families. EVALUATION/OUTCOMES:Methods used for evaluation 1 year after initiation of RBC in the CTICU: direct observation, interviews, and discharge satisfaction surveys. Patients and families have verbalized their comfort level in knowing they can take a break away from the unit and come back anytime. Patients feel included in the care and constantly informed of the plan of care with bedside reporting. There has also been an increase in satisfaction of CTICU care on discharge surveys. The paradigm shift of RBC has led to other initiatives in the CTICU. RBC ultimately promotes a safer environment for patients and a higher level of professionalism within the unit as evidenced by achievement of Beacon Award.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:20:57Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-26en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:20:57Z-
dc.identifier.citation2010 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 19(3), e15-e28. doi:10.4037/ajcc2010866en_GB
dc.conference.date2010en_GB
dc.conference.nameNational Teaching Institute and Critical Care Expositionen_GB
dc.conference.hostAmerican Association of Critical-Care Nursesen_GB
dc.conference.locationWashington, D.C., USAen_GB
dc.identifier.citation2010 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 19(3), e15-e28. doi:10.4037/ajcc2010866en_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.