When Pigs Fly!: Establishing a Safe Environment for ICU Staff and Patients During an H1N1 Outbreak

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157020
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
When Pigs Fly!: Establishing a Safe Environment for ICU Staff and Patients During an H1N1 Outbreak
Author(s):
Niemchak, Stephanie; Mostaghimi, Parvaneh
Author Details:
Parvaneh Mostaghimi, RN,BSN, Duke University Hospital, Durham, North Carolina, USA, email: mosta001@mc.duke.edu; Stephanie Niemchak
Abstract:
PURPOSE: The recent outbreak of H1N1 (swine flu) in our region created both opportunities and challenges for our medical ICU. This summer, several confirmed cases of H1N1 initially appeared in small numbers on our unit, creating a sense of fear in our staff, as well as in the families of patients. Information changed daily, so it was difficult to stay on top of best practices. Our multidisciplinary team gathered our data and collaboratively created an action plan. DESCRIPTION: Following CDC guidelines, and in conjunction with guidance from our Infection Control Department, our team decided that all suspected H1N1 cases would be placed on droplet isolation: guilty until proven innocent. The team was educated on influenza symptoms, nasal washings were ordered and collected, and viral polymerase chain reactions were sent. Droplet isolation signs were hung on closed doors and strict handwashing was enforced. When absolutely necessary, patients underwent ECMO treatment. Families were educated about good respiratory hygiene and the appropriate use of surgical masks. Staff were taught when to switch to N-95 masks for employees. These situations included the use of an oscillator for mechanical ventilation, as well as for the use of aerosolized medications and high concentrations of oxygen. When the topics of seasonal and H1N1 flu vaccines were discussed, the idea of a multidisciplinary staff survey was developed to determine the interest of staff in receiving an H1N1 vaccine for the first time. The questions included experience taking care of a confirmed case of H1N1 on the medical ICU, as well as the likelihood that the same health care provider would take the H1N1 vaccine if made available for free in the workplace. EVALUATION/OUTCOMES:We now have clear guidelines for staff on how to protect patients as well as their families and themselves, acknowledging that best practice in this field of epidemiology is evolving daily worldwide. According to our survey, 62% of staff who had direct patient contact with H1N1 patients were in favor of taking the H1N1 vaccine for themselves. Fifty-six percent of staff who had never cared for an H1N1 patient were in favor of taking the same vaccine, for a difference of 8%. As of the writing of this abstract, no one on the medical ICU team has developed H1N1. All our H1N1 patients have survived to date, which is a testament to our team-work and dedication to excellence in patient care.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
26-Oct-2011
Citation:
2010 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 19(3), e15-e28. doi:10.4037/ajcc2010866
Conference Date:
2010
Conference Name:
National Teaching Institute and Critical Care Exposition
Conference Host:
American Association of Critical-Care Nurses
Conference Location:
Washington, D.C., USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleWhen Pigs Fly!: Establishing a Safe Environment for ICU Staff and Patients During an H1N1 Outbreaken_GB
dc.contributor.authorNiemchak, Stephanieen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMostaghimi, Parvanehen_GB
dc.author.detailsParvaneh Mostaghimi, RN,BSN, Duke University Hospital, Durham, North Carolina, USA, email: mosta001@mc.duke.edu; Stephanie Niemchaken_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157020-
dc.description.abstractPURPOSE: The recent outbreak of H1N1 (swine flu) in our region created both opportunities and challenges for our medical ICU. This summer, several confirmed cases of H1N1 initially appeared in small numbers on our unit, creating a sense of fear in our staff, as well as in the families of patients. Information changed daily, so it was difficult to stay on top of best practices. Our multidisciplinary team gathered our data and collaboratively created an action plan. DESCRIPTION: Following CDC guidelines, and in conjunction with guidance from our Infection Control Department, our team decided that all suspected H1N1 cases would be placed on droplet isolation: guilty until proven innocent. The team was educated on influenza symptoms, nasal washings were ordered and collected, and viral polymerase chain reactions were sent. Droplet isolation signs were hung on closed doors and strict handwashing was enforced. When absolutely necessary, patients underwent ECMO treatment. Families were educated about good respiratory hygiene and the appropriate use of surgical masks. Staff were taught when to switch to N-95 masks for employees. These situations included the use of an oscillator for mechanical ventilation, as well as for the use of aerosolized medications and high concentrations of oxygen. When the topics of seasonal and H1N1 flu vaccines were discussed, the idea of a multidisciplinary staff survey was developed to determine the interest of staff in receiving an H1N1 vaccine for the first time. The questions included experience taking care of a confirmed case of H1N1 on the medical ICU, as well as the likelihood that the same health care provider would take the H1N1 vaccine if made available for free in the workplace. EVALUATION/OUTCOMES:We now have clear guidelines for staff on how to protect patients as well as their families and themselves, acknowledging that best practice in this field of epidemiology is evolving daily worldwide. According to our survey, 62% of staff who had direct patient contact with H1N1 patients were in favor of taking the H1N1 vaccine for themselves. Fifty-six percent of staff who had never cared for an H1N1 patient were in favor of taking the same vaccine, for a difference of 8%. As of the writing of this abstract, no one on the medical ICU team has developed H1N1. All our H1N1 patients have survived to date, which is a testament to our team-work and dedication to excellence in patient care.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:21:01Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-26en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:21:01Z-
dc.identifier.citation2010 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 19(3), e15-e28. doi:10.4037/ajcc2010866en_GB
dc.conference.date2010en_GB
dc.conference.nameNational Teaching Institute and Critical Care Expositionen_GB
dc.conference.hostAmerican Association of Critical-Care Nursesen_GB
dc.conference.locationWashington, D.C., USAen_GB
dc.identifier.citation2010 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 19(3), e15-e28. doi:10.4037/ajcc2010866en_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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