2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157021
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Intensive Care Unit (ICU) Patient and Family Advisory Council: Changing the Unit Culture
Author(s):
Nasenbeny, Keri E.; Haverland, Amy; Sisco, Robert; Wood, Desiree
Author Details:
Keri E. Nasenbeny, RN,BSN,MHA, University of Washington Medical Center, Seattle, Washington, USA, email: kehle@u.washington.edu; Amy Haverland; Robert Sisco; Desiree Wood
Abstract:
PURPOSE: An ICU Patient and Family Advisory Council (PFAC) was established for our medical-surgical-transplant and cardiothoracic ICUs as a means to shift the culture of our units toward patient- and family-centered care. Our aim was to engage current and former patients and families as advisors on the council and then to partner with them to develop innovative programs that would improve patient, family, and staff satisfaction. DESCRIPTION: Our PFAC began with intensive planning, staff outreach and education including concepts central to patient/family centered care. Staff then nominated patients/families for the PFAC. After screening potential advisors, the ICU PFAC met initially in March 2008. Membership consists of 16 current/former patients and family members, 4 ICU RNs, social work, physicians, director of patient care, and nurse managers. We sought to understand from patients/families their ICU care experience and their ideas for improvement. Meeting monthly, we brainstormed and prioritized areas for improvement. Over 14 months we completed a multitude of projects, all planned and implemented by patients/ families in partnership with staff. Projects included staff education by our patient advisors; a Getting to Know Me poster placed in patient rooms; a comprehensive 40-page ICU manual for patients/families; funding for a comfort tray program for families with loved ones who were dying; and implementation of a policy regarding family presence during emergency resuscitation. Recently, we implemented a volunteer liaison program, in which volunteers make ICU rounds providing education, emotional support, and guidance to our patients and families. EVALUATION/OUTCOMES:The primary method of evaluation for this project has been feedback from ICU patient and family advisors and liaison volunteers. This feedback, gathered monthly at PFAC meetings, tells us that our interventions have made a difference. Specifically, we hear that patients and families feel better informed and know what to expect, that they feel more welcome and involved in the care, and that emotional needs are being better met. One important outcome of this project is the realization that current patient satisfaction scoring systems are not sensitive enough to the ICU experience; we are currently in the process of implementing a new system to collect real-time data from patients and families.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
26-Oct-2011
Citation:
2010 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 19(3), e15-e28. doi:10.4037/ajcc2010866
Conference Date:
2010
Conference Name:
National Teaching Institute and Critical Care Exposition
Conference Host:
American Association of Critical-Care Nurses
Conference Location:
Washington, D.C., USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleIntensive Care Unit (ICU) Patient and Family Advisory Council: Changing the Unit Cultureen_GB
dc.contributor.authorNasenbeny, Keri E.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorHaverland, Amyen_GB
dc.contributor.authorSisco, Roberten_GB
dc.contributor.authorWood, Desireeen_GB
dc.author.detailsKeri E. Nasenbeny, RN,BSN,MHA, University of Washington Medical Center, Seattle, Washington, USA, email: kehle@u.washington.edu; Amy Haverland; Robert Sisco; Desiree Wooden_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157021-
dc.description.abstractPURPOSE: An ICU Patient and Family Advisory Council (PFAC) was established for our medical-surgical-transplant and cardiothoracic ICUs as a means to shift the culture of our units toward patient- and family-centered care. Our aim was to engage current and former patients and families as advisors on the council and then to partner with them to develop innovative programs that would improve patient, family, and staff satisfaction. DESCRIPTION: Our PFAC began with intensive planning, staff outreach and education including concepts central to patient/family centered care. Staff then nominated patients/families for the PFAC. After screening potential advisors, the ICU PFAC met initially in March 2008. Membership consists of 16 current/former patients and family members, 4 ICU RNs, social work, physicians, director of patient care, and nurse managers. We sought to understand from patients/families their ICU care experience and their ideas for improvement. Meeting monthly, we brainstormed and prioritized areas for improvement. Over 14 months we completed a multitude of projects, all planned and implemented by patients/ families in partnership with staff. Projects included staff education by our patient advisors; a Getting to Know Me poster placed in patient rooms; a comprehensive 40-page ICU manual for patients/families; funding for a comfort tray program for families with loved ones who were dying; and implementation of a policy regarding family presence during emergency resuscitation. Recently, we implemented a volunteer liaison program, in which volunteers make ICU rounds providing education, emotional support, and guidance to our patients and families. EVALUATION/OUTCOMES:The primary method of evaluation for this project has been feedback from ICU patient and family advisors and liaison volunteers. This feedback, gathered monthly at PFAC meetings, tells us that our interventions have made a difference. Specifically, we hear that patients and families feel better informed and know what to expect, that they feel more welcome and involved in the care, and that emotional needs are being better met. One important outcome of this project is the realization that current patient satisfaction scoring systems are not sensitive enough to the ICU experience; we are currently in the process of implementing a new system to collect real-time data from patients and families.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:21:04Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-26en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:21:04Z-
dc.identifier.citation2010 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 19(3), e15-e28. doi:10.4037/ajcc2010866en_GB
dc.conference.date2010en_GB
dc.conference.nameNational Teaching Institute and Critical Care Expositionen_GB
dc.conference.hostAmerican Association of Critical-Care Nursesen_GB
dc.conference.locationWashington, D.C., USAen_GB
dc.identifier.citation2010 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 19(3), e15-e28. doi:10.4037/ajcc2010866en_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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