Parental Presence During Invasive Procedures and Resuscitation: Thematic Analysis of Post Intervention Parental Comments

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157022
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Parental Presence During Invasive Procedures and Resuscitation: Thematic Analysis of Post Intervention Parental Comments
Author(s):
Natale, Kristan M.; Hickey, Patricia; Curley, Martha
Author Details:
Kristan M. Natale, RN,BS,BSN,CCRN, Children's Hospital, Boston, Boston, Massachusetts, USA, email: kristan.natale@tch.harvard.edu; Patricia Hickey; Martha Curley
Abstract:
POSTER PURPOSE: To evaluate parentsÆ perceptions and experiences of being present during invasive procedures and resuscitation. BACKGROUND/SIGNIFICANCE:Family presence during invasive procedures and resuscitation is a relatively new practice in the acute care pediatric setting. We sought to evaluate the impact of parent presence during invasive procedures and/or resuscitation after implementation of formal practice guidelines and multidisciplinary education. METHOD: In September 2004, a multiphase longitudinal interventional study titled "Parental Presence During Invasive Procedures and Resuscitation" was initiated throughout the cardiovascular and critical care programs at ChildrenÆs Hospital, Boston. In 2008, a postimplementation instrument was distributed to families throughout the cardiovascular and critical care programs. Of 138 families surveyed, 75 parents provided open-ended comments on the practice of providing parents the opportunity to be present during invasive procedures and resuscitation. A thematic analysis of parent comments from the postpractice survey was performed to evaluate the impact on parentsÆ perceptions and experiences with this practice. RESULTS: Four major themes were identified and operationalized in the analysis: choice, contribution, acknowledgment, and help. Parents wanted a choice to be present. The theme of contribution was identified from comments on parents as having a role in the health care process, making a difference in the childÆs experience, and the desire to provide unique instrumentality in their childÆs recovery. Additionally, parents identify themselves as the expert in their childÆs care and believe that their knowledge of their child should be acknowledged to optimize care. Parents with less experience in the acute care setting require help by detailed explanation and preparation before the procedure. CONCLUSIONS: Parents desire the option to remain present at the bedside during invasive procedures and resuscitation. Contributing to their childÆs care was a priority of the parents surveyed. Nurses are in the distinctive position to help families be present. Parent presence is one vehicle that strengthens the unique role parents have in the lives of their children during the critical illness trajectory.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
26-Oct-2011
Citation:
2010 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 19(3), e15-e28. doi:10.4037/ajcc2010866
Conference Date:
2010
Conference Name:
National Teaching Institute and Critical Care Exposition
Conference Host:
American Association of Critical-Care Nurses
Conference Location:
Washington, D.C., USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleParental Presence During Invasive Procedures and Resuscitation: Thematic Analysis of Post Intervention Parental Commentsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorNatale, Kristan M.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorHickey, Patriciaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorCurley, Marthaen_GB
dc.author.detailsKristan M. Natale, RN,BS,BSN,CCRN, Children's Hospital, Boston, Boston, Massachusetts, USA, email: kristan.natale@tch.harvard.edu; Patricia Hickey; Martha Curleyen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157022-
dc.description.abstractPOSTER PURPOSE: To evaluate parentsÆ perceptions and experiences of being present during invasive procedures and resuscitation. BACKGROUND/SIGNIFICANCE:Family presence during invasive procedures and resuscitation is a relatively new practice in the acute care pediatric setting. We sought to evaluate the impact of parent presence during invasive procedures and/or resuscitation after implementation of formal practice guidelines and multidisciplinary education. METHOD: In September 2004, a multiphase longitudinal interventional study titled "Parental Presence During Invasive Procedures and Resuscitation" was initiated throughout the cardiovascular and critical care programs at ChildrenÆs Hospital, Boston. In 2008, a postimplementation instrument was distributed to families throughout the cardiovascular and critical care programs. Of 138 families surveyed, 75 parents provided open-ended comments on the practice of providing parents the opportunity to be present during invasive procedures and resuscitation. A thematic analysis of parent comments from the postpractice survey was performed to evaluate the impact on parentsÆ perceptions and experiences with this practice. RESULTS: Four major themes were identified and operationalized in the analysis: choice, contribution, acknowledgment, and help. Parents wanted a choice to be present. The theme of contribution was identified from comments on parents as having a role in the health care process, making a difference in the childÆs experience, and the desire to provide unique instrumentality in their childÆs recovery. Additionally, parents identify themselves as the expert in their childÆs care and believe that their knowledge of their child should be acknowledged to optimize care. Parents with less experience in the acute care setting require help by detailed explanation and preparation before the procedure. CONCLUSIONS: Parents desire the option to remain present at the bedside during invasive procedures and resuscitation. Contributing to their childÆs care was a priority of the parents surveyed. Nurses are in the distinctive position to help families be present. Parent presence is one vehicle that strengthens the unique role parents have in the lives of their children during the critical illness trajectory.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:21:07Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-26en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:21:07Z-
dc.identifier.citation2010 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 19(3), e15-e28. doi:10.4037/ajcc2010866en_GB
dc.conference.date2010en_GB
dc.conference.nameNational Teaching Institute and Critical Care Expositionen_GB
dc.conference.hostAmerican Association of Critical-Care Nursesen_GB
dc.conference.locationWashington, D.C., USAen_GB
dc.identifier.citation2010 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 19(3), e15-e28. doi:10.4037/ajcc2010866en_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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