2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157023
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Shhhh! Putting Emphasis on Sleep and Recuperation in the ICU.
Author(s):
Nguyen, Miriam V.; Mostaghimi, Zhila; Fullwood, Joyce
Author Details:
Miriam V. Nguyen, RN,BAN,BS, Duke University Hospital, Durham, North Carolina, USA, email: miriam.nguyen@duke.edu; Zhila Mostaghimi; Joyce Fullwood
Abstract:
PURPOSE: Patients often complained about the noise on our ICU. They described being tired as a result of noise interrupting their sleep. Sleep is vital to recuperation, yet little was done to address this important aspect of recovery. Our performance improvement (PI) committee recognized the impact of our open visitation policy, which allowed visitation at any time of the day regardless of patient sleep patterns or rest. They tackled this issue by initiating day and night periods of Quiet Time. DESCRIPTION: To investigate our noise level, Occupational Health and Safety Division monitored noise from 8 AM to 4 PM and from 2 PM to 10 PM over 8.5 hours. Our levels ranged from 58û63 decibels. In comparison to another unit that had Quiet Time, we found that their noise level was less than half of our ICU, a significant difference. After data analysis, the PI committee developed an informational bulletin board and flyers to educate staff and visitors of our noise level and remind them of the effects of sleep deprivation. After an educational period of 2 weeks, we formally set up Quiet Time between 2 PM and 4 PM and between 11 PM and 6 AM. Visitors were asked to leave during this time and patients were allowed to rest unless important procedures or other care needs were indicated. The lights were dimmed, patient doors were closed, and conversations were kept to a whisper. Although we were consistent in implementing this new guideline, we recognized that there were times of exceptions because of patientsÆ clinical status. We looked at unique situations and maintained appropriate and compassionate flexibility. EVALUATION/OUTCOMES:Patients and families have been pleased with Quiet Time and have given many positive comments on our unit satisfaction surveys. In fact, as patients are transferred to lower care areas, they have mentioned our Quiet Time to their nurses. As well as providing rest for patients, it has also given family members a chance to take a much needed guilt-free break from the bedside. All team members have been pleased with changes on the unit during both day and night Quiet Time and we continue to seek ways to decrease noise at night. New nurses have taken on the challenge of being Quiet Time champions. Our unit Quiet Time was mentioned in a local news article.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
26-Oct-2011
Citation:
2010 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 19(3), e15-e28. doi:10.4037/ajcc2010866
Conference Date:
2010
Conference Name:
National Teaching Institute and Critical Care Exposition
Conference Host:
American Association of Critical-Care Nurses
Conference Location:
Washington, D.C., USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleShhhh! Putting Emphasis on Sleep and Recuperation in the ICU.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorNguyen, Miriam V.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorMostaghimi, Zhilaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorFullwood, Joyceen_GB
dc.author.detailsMiriam V. Nguyen, RN,BAN,BS, Duke University Hospital, Durham, North Carolina, USA, email: miriam.nguyen@duke.edu; Zhila Mostaghimi; Joyce Fullwooden_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157023-
dc.description.abstractPURPOSE: Patients often complained about the noise on our ICU. They described being tired as a result of noise interrupting their sleep. Sleep is vital to recuperation, yet little was done to address this important aspect of recovery. Our performance improvement (PI) committee recognized the impact of our open visitation policy, which allowed visitation at any time of the day regardless of patient sleep patterns or rest. They tackled this issue by initiating day and night periods of Quiet Time. DESCRIPTION: To investigate our noise level, Occupational Health and Safety Division monitored noise from 8 AM to 4 PM and from 2 PM to 10 PM over 8.5 hours. Our levels ranged from 58û63 decibels. In comparison to another unit that had Quiet Time, we found that their noise level was less than half of our ICU, a significant difference. After data analysis, the PI committee developed an informational bulletin board and flyers to educate staff and visitors of our noise level and remind them of the effects of sleep deprivation. After an educational period of 2 weeks, we formally set up Quiet Time between 2 PM and 4 PM and between 11 PM and 6 AM. Visitors were asked to leave during this time and patients were allowed to rest unless important procedures or other care needs were indicated. The lights were dimmed, patient doors were closed, and conversations were kept to a whisper. Although we were consistent in implementing this new guideline, we recognized that there were times of exceptions because of patientsÆ clinical status. We looked at unique situations and maintained appropriate and compassionate flexibility. EVALUATION/OUTCOMES:Patients and families have been pleased with Quiet Time and have given many positive comments on our unit satisfaction surveys. In fact, as patients are transferred to lower care areas, they have mentioned our Quiet Time to their nurses. As well as providing rest for patients, it has also given family members a chance to take a much needed guilt-free break from the bedside. All team members have been pleased with changes on the unit during both day and night Quiet Time and we continue to seek ways to decrease noise at night. New nurses have taken on the challenge of being Quiet Time champions. Our unit Quiet Time was mentioned in a local news article.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:21:11Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-26en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:21:11Z-
dc.identifier.citation2010 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 19(3), e15-e28. doi:10.4037/ajcc2010866en_GB
dc.conference.date2010en_GB
dc.conference.nameNational Teaching Institute and Critical Care Expositionen_GB
dc.conference.hostAmerican Association of Critical-Care Nursesen_GB
dc.conference.locationWashington, D.C., USAen_GB
dc.identifier.citation2010 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 19(3), e15-e28. doi:10.4037/ajcc2010866en_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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