2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157025
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Crash Course: Resuscitating the Code Blue Process
Author(s):
Norman, Vivian F.; Winokur, Elizabeth
Author Details:
Vivian F. Norman, RN,MSN,CCRN, St. Joseph Hospital, Orange, California, USA, email: vivian.norman@stjoe.org; Elizabeth Winokur
Abstract:
PURPOSE: Resuscitation is a complex process that requires optimal performance from all team members. Ongoing problems are documentation, ACLS skill degradation over time, RNs may lack skills to communicate with physicians, particularly addressing physician orders that deviate from ACLS algorithms and new biphasic defibrillators. The usual methods of in-service, documentation reviews, ACLS, and traditional mock codes failed to sustain improvements. DESCRIPTION: Crash Course is a 2-hour program, held in the controlled setting of a classroom, which begins with a brief review of the ACLS algorithms, code team responsibilities, and the Code Blue documentation form. The RNs participate in several mock code scenarios. In each scenario, 4 to 5 RNs assume code team roles, while the others record the code events. Class format is based on experiential learning and adult learning principles. Everyone in the class has a role in every fast-paced, real time scenario. Coaching is provided as necessary to reinforce ACLS algorithms, procedures, scripting for physician/RN communication, and defibrillator function. Instructors role-play family members and physicians at the code. Students are presented with common problematic situations that must be successfully managed. After each code, the instructors debrief the participants and review the code records for accuracy. Crash Course was offered frequently during 2008, and over 90% of critical care and emergency department RNs attended. Crash Course provides one more strategy to refresh ACLS skills, reinforcing documentation for Code Blue in a controlled nonthreatening environment, thereby encouraging skill transference to real Code Blue occurrences. EVALUATION/OUTCOMES:National Registry of Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (NRCPR) data for 4th quarter 2007 showed that 50% of code records had documentation issues and decreased to 12% in 1st quarter 2009; a 76% improvement. NRCPR data in one 2007 quarter showed up to 40% ACLS protocol deviation and, after Crash Course implementation, dropped significantly by first quarter 2009 to 12%. Crash Course proved so successful that it was added to the budget for RNs to attend biannually, in years opposite ACLS recertification. RNs report a higher comfort level in addressing physician compliance issues, and positive team dynamics. This course requires few material resources and is easily transferable to other institutions.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
26-Oct-2011
Citation:
2010 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 19(3), e15-e28. doi:10.4037/ajcc2010866
Conference Date:
2010
Conference Name:
National Teaching Institute and Critical Care Exposition
Conference Host:
American Association of Critical-Care Nurses
Conference Location:
Washington, D.C., USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCrash Course: Resuscitating the Code Blue Processen_GB
dc.contributor.authorNorman, Vivian F.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorWinokur, Elizabethen_GB
dc.author.detailsVivian F. Norman, RN,MSN,CCRN, St. Joseph Hospital, Orange, California, USA, email: vivian.norman@stjoe.org; Elizabeth Winokuren_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157025-
dc.description.abstractPURPOSE: Resuscitation is a complex process that requires optimal performance from all team members. Ongoing problems are documentation, ACLS skill degradation over time, RNs may lack skills to communicate with physicians, particularly addressing physician orders that deviate from ACLS algorithms and new biphasic defibrillators. The usual methods of in-service, documentation reviews, ACLS, and traditional mock codes failed to sustain improvements. DESCRIPTION: Crash Course is a 2-hour program, held in the controlled setting of a classroom, which begins with a brief review of the ACLS algorithms, code team responsibilities, and the Code Blue documentation form. The RNs participate in several mock code scenarios. In each scenario, 4 to 5 RNs assume code team roles, while the others record the code events. Class format is based on experiential learning and adult learning principles. Everyone in the class has a role in every fast-paced, real time scenario. Coaching is provided as necessary to reinforce ACLS algorithms, procedures, scripting for physician/RN communication, and defibrillator function. Instructors role-play family members and physicians at the code. Students are presented with common problematic situations that must be successfully managed. After each code, the instructors debrief the participants and review the code records for accuracy. Crash Course was offered frequently during 2008, and over 90% of critical care and emergency department RNs attended. Crash Course provides one more strategy to refresh ACLS skills, reinforcing documentation for Code Blue in a controlled nonthreatening environment, thereby encouraging skill transference to real Code Blue occurrences. EVALUATION/OUTCOMES:National Registry of Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (NRCPR) data for 4th quarter 2007 showed that 50% of code records had documentation issues and decreased to 12% in 1st quarter 2009; a 76% improvement. NRCPR data in one 2007 quarter showed up to 40% ACLS protocol deviation and, after Crash Course implementation, dropped significantly by first quarter 2009 to 12%. Crash Course proved so successful that it was added to the budget for RNs to attend biannually, in years opposite ACLS recertification. RNs report a higher comfort level in addressing physician compliance issues, and positive team dynamics. This course requires few material resources and is easily transferable to other institutions.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:21:17Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-26en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:21:17Z-
dc.identifier.citation2010 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 19(3), e15-e28. doi:10.4037/ajcc2010866en_GB
dc.conference.date2010en_GB
dc.conference.nameNational Teaching Institute and Critical Care Expositionen_GB
dc.conference.hostAmerican Association of Critical-Care Nursesen_GB
dc.conference.locationWashington, D.C., USAen_GB
dc.identifier.citation2010 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 19(3), e15-e28. doi:10.4037/ajcc2010866en_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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