2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157027
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Benefits to Providing Acute Stroke Education
Author(s):
Olson, DaiWai M.
Author Details:
DaiWai M. Olson, RN,CCRN, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina, USA, email: olson006@mc.duke.edu
Abstract:
POSTER PURPOSE: Stroke education and communication are linked and affect patientsÆ adherence to medical recommendations. Educators assume that education delivered is equal to education obtained and should translate into improved outcomes for patients. This study explores the relationship between the education/communication that stroke patients receive and clinically relevant outcomes (medication persistence, rehospitalization, and physician follow-up appointment) by using data from the Adherence eValuation After Ischemic stroke Longitudinal (AVAIL) registry. BACKGROUND/SIGNIFICANCE:In the United States, stroke is the third leading cause of death. The Joint Commission-Stroke certified hospitals offer stroke education early in the patientÆs stay. Often, education to prevent secondary stroke begins in the intensive care unit (ICU), yet data on the impact of education on stroke prevention medication persistence and outcomes are limited. Understanding the implications of education on stroke outcomes will promote new interventions that may improve both outcomes and education during the patientÆs recovery. METHOD: AVAIL is a multicenter registry of 2898 stroke patients enrolled via a voluntary subset of 101 US hospitals participating in the American Heart AssociationÆs Get With The Guidelines (GWTG) Stroke program. Baseline data came from GWTG and medical record review; 3- and 12-month data were obtained through telephone interviews by trained interviewers. Socioeconomic status (SES) was dichotomized as high or low SES based on self-reported response to income meeting basic needs. Individual and composite scores of stroke education and perception of communication with health care providers were determined for each patient. RESULTS: Overall, medication persistence was high (78%); the majority (93%) of patients had follow-up appointments within 3 months, and rehospitalization was modest (19%). In the low-SES cohort, higher medication persistence was associated with clear explanation of discharge medications (P=.001) and a higher composite score for education and communication (P=.01). Rehospitalization was associated with more medication instruction in both the high-SES (82 vs 71%) and the low-SES groups (77 vs 66%). In the high-SES group, higher rates of follow-up appointments were associated with the perception that health care providers listened to them and involved them in their health care decisions (P= .002). CONCLUSIONS: Stroke education and communication are important and may result in greater understanding of new stroke symptoms and appropriate rehospitalization. Although this study demonstrates that education and communication efforts are successful, only univariate analyses were performed for this abstract, and a multivariate model could be explored. The results can be used to help further refine stroke education and patient communication patterns in the early acute phase of stroke treatment.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
26-Oct-2011
Citation:
2010 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 19(3), e15-e28. doi:10.4037/ajcc2010866
Conference Date:
2010
Conference Name:
National Teaching Institute and Critical Care Exposition
Conference Host:
American Association of Critical-Care Nurses
Conference Location:
Washington, D.C., USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleBenefits to Providing Acute Stroke Educationen_GB
dc.contributor.authorOlson, DaiWai M.en_GB
dc.author.detailsDaiWai M. Olson, RN,CCRN, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina, USA, email: olson006@mc.duke.eduen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157027-
dc.description.abstractPOSTER PURPOSE: Stroke education and communication are linked and affect patientsÆ adherence to medical recommendations. Educators assume that education delivered is equal to education obtained and should translate into improved outcomes for patients. This study explores the relationship between the education/communication that stroke patients receive and clinically relevant outcomes (medication persistence, rehospitalization, and physician follow-up appointment) by using data from the Adherence eValuation After Ischemic stroke Longitudinal (AVAIL) registry. BACKGROUND/SIGNIFICANCE:In the United States, stroke is the third leading cause of death. The Joint Commission-Stroke certified hospitals offer stroke education early in the patientÆs stay. Often, education to prevent secondary stroke begins in the intensive care unit (ICU), yet data on the impact of education on stroke prevention medication persistence and outcomes are limited. Understanding the implications of education on stroke outcomes will promote new interventions that may improve both outcomes and education during the patientÆs recovery. METHOD: AVAIL is a multicenter registry of 2898 stroke patients enrolled via a voluntary subset of 101 US hospitals participating in the American Heart AssociationÆs Get With The Guidelines (GWTG) Stroke program. Baseline data came from GWTG and medical record review; 3- and 12-month data were obtained through telephone interviews by trained interviewers. Socioeconomic status (SES) was dichotomized as high or low SES based on self-reported response to income meeting basic needs. Individual and composite scores of stroke education and perception of communication with health care providers were determined for each patient. RESULTS: Overall, medication persistence was high (78%); the majority (93%) of patients had follow-up appointments within 3 months, and rehospitalization was modest (19%). In the low-SES cohort, higher medication persistence was associated with clear explanation of discharge medications (P=.001) and a higher composite score for education and communication (P=.01). Rehospitalization was associated with more medication instruction in both the high-SES (82 vs 71%) and the low-SES groups (77 vs 66%). In the high-SES group, higher rates of follow-up appointments were associated with the perception that health care providers listened to them and involved them in their health care decisions (P= .002). CONCLUSIONS: Stroke education and communication are important and may result in greater understanding of new stroke symptoms and appropriate rehospitalization. Although this study demonstrates that education and communication efforts are successful, only univariate analyses were performed for this abstract, and a multivariate model could be explored. The results can be used to help further refine stroke education and patient communication patterns in the early acute phase of stroke treatment.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:21:24Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-26en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:21:24Z-
dc.identifier.citation2010 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 19(3), e15-e28. doi:10.4037/ajcc2010866en_GB
dc.conference.date2010en_GB
dc.conference.nameNational Teaching Institute and Critical Care Expositionen_GB
dc.conference.hostAmerican Association of Critical-Care Nursesen_GB
dc.conference.locationWashington, D.C., USAen_GB
dc.identifier.citation2010 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 19(3), e15-e28. doi:10.4037/ajcc2010866en_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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