Saving the Green: One Surgical Intensive Care Unit's Journey to Save Money as Well as the Environment

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157028
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Saving the Green: One Surgical Intensive Care Unit's Journey to Save Money as Well as the Environment
Author(s):
Paciella, Mary E.; Luebke, Frederick; Young, Kerri
Author Details:
Mary E. Paciella, RN,MS,CCRN,PCCN,CANP, Stony Brook University Medical Center, Stony Brook, New York, USA, email: mpaciella@notes.cc.sunysb.edu; Frederick Luebke; Kerri Young
Abstract:
PURPOSE: The United States economy has challenged nurses to think about health care in ways we have not before. As nurses we fear that quality patient care will be compromised with budget cuts. We need to look for ways to protect the quality of the care by reducing unnecessary expenditure and waste. In a culture where it is common to be wasteful, we not only throw away dollars, we add unnecessarily to our landfills and destroy the environment for future generations. DESCRIPTION: Using AACN values of accountability-taking responsibility for what we can change; stewardship-being fair and responsible in the management of resources, while maintaining our commitment to Quality and Excellence, the surgical ICU nurses partnered with the materials management department to design a supply use/waste reduction project. The fully intact supplies that could not be reused for another patient that normally would have been thrown away for infection control purposes upon a patientÆs discharge were gathered for 1 week. These supplies were then photographed, weighed, and itemized for monetary value. In 1 week, 158 lb of waste was gathered costing $1511.61 (annual weight, 8216 lb; annual cost, $78603.72). A cart displaying the high cost items was developed along with an 8x10 picture of the waste for visual understanding. The existing supply cart was labeled with the prices of each item to increase awareness. A jeopardy game was designed that reviewed item cost, waste questions as well as information about unit usage of items. This interactive education was provided to staff of all disciplines on all shifts. EVALUATION/OUTCOMES:As a result of this education, the staff has been careful not to overstock rooms. Additionally, certain high-price items that were located on the supply cart for anyone to take for any unit, were moved to a location where there was more control over their use and they could be charged to the appropriate budget. The average expenditure from October 2008 to March 2009 was $116.55 per patient day. From April to July 2009, after project implementation, the cost of supplies per patient day has decreased to an average of $100.30, which results in total savings of $34187 in only 1 quarter. The annual projected savings is approximately $136748.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
26-Oct-2011
Citation:
2010 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 19(3), e15-e28. doi:10.4037/ajcc2010866
Conference Date:
2010
Conference Name:
National Teaching Institute and Critical Care Exposition
Conference Host:
American Association of Critical-Care Nurses
Conference Location:
Washington, D.C., USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSaving the Green: One Surgical Intensive Care Unit's Journey to Save Money as Well as the Environmenten_GB
dc.contributor.authorPaciella, Mary E.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorLuebke, Fredericken_GB
dc.contributor.authorYoung, Kerrien_GB
dc.author.detailsMary E. Paciella, RN,MS,CCRN,PCCN,CANP, Stony Brook University Medical Center, Stony Brook, New York, USA, email: mpaciella@notes.cc.sunysb.edu; Frederick Luebke; Kerri Youngen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157028-
dc.description.abstractPURPOSE: The United States economy has challenged nurses to think about health care in ways we have not before. As nurses we fear that quality patient care will be compromised with budget cuts. We need to look for ways to protect the quality of the care by reducing unnecessary expenditure and waste. In a culture where it is common to be wasteful, we not only throw away dollars, we add unnecessarily to our landfills and destroy the environment for future generations. DESCRIPTION: Using AACN values of accountability-taking responsibility for what we can change; stewardship-being fair and responsible in the management of resources, while maintaining our commitment to Quality and Excellence, the surgical ICU nurses partnered with the materials management department to design a supply use/waste reduction project. The fully intact supplies that could not be reused for another patient that normally would have been thrown away for infection control purposes upon a patientÆs discharge were gathered for 1 week. These supplies were then photographed, weighed, and itemized for monetary value. In 1 week, 158 lb of waste was gathered costing $1511.61 (annual weight, 8216 lb; annual cost, $78603.72). A cart displaying the high cost items was developed along with an 8x10 picture of the waste for visual understanding. The existing supply cart was labeled with the prices of each item to increase awareness. A jeopardy game was designed that reviewed item cost, waste questions as well as information about unit usage of items. This interactive education was provided to staff of all disciplines on all shifts. EVALUATION/OUTCOMES:As a result of this education, the staff has been careful not to overstock rooms. Additionally, certain high-price items that were located on the supply cart for anyone to take for any unit, were moved to a location where there was more control over their use and they could be charged to the appropriate budget. The average expenditure from October 2008 to March 2009 was $116.55 per patient day. From April to July 2009, after project implementation, the cost of supplies per patient day has decreased to an average of $100.30, which results in total savings of $34187 in only 1 quarter. The annual projected savings is approximately $136748.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:21:27Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-26en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:21:27Z-
dc.identifier.citation2010 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 19(3), e15-e28. doi:10.4037/ajcc2010866en_GB
dc.conference.date2010en_GB
dc.conference.nameNational Teaching Institute and Critical Care Expositionen_GB
dc.conference.hostAmerican Association of Critical-Care Nursesen_GB
dc.conference.locationWashington, D.C., USAen_GB
dc.identifier.citation2010 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 19(3), e15-e28. doi:10.4037/ajcc2010866en_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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