2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157034
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Making Room: Family Presence During Resuscitation Supports a Healthy Work Environment
Author(s):
Prentice, Donna; Dodds, Kelly; Williams, Jennifer
Author Details:
Donna Prentice, MSN,CCRN, Barnes-Jewish Hospital, Saint Louis, Missouri, USA, email: dxp7813@bjc.org; Kelly Dodds; Jennifer Williams
Abstract:
PURPOSE: A large, urban, tertiary care hospital designed to provide family presence (FP) during resuscitation. The emergency department implemented FP in 2006 with great success. The Code Committee implemented FP during resuscitation in January 2009, throughout the hospital. FP during resuscitation has been shown to help meet the emotional needs of family members during a critical time and affords the family the opportunity to be kept informed, to be with their loved one, and to have closure. DESCRIPTION: A subcommittee of the hospital code committee was given charge to implement family presence. Spiritual Care services was identified as a consistent provider that was present for all codes. They were recruited to become the personnel to screen families and to become the guide and support for the family during the code. An algorithm was developed for the process. Tools were developed for family screening. Support from key groups (nursing administration, physicians, spiritual care) was obtained through literature review, conferencing, and experiential sharing. Education was provided for the spiritual care personnel regarding the screening process and what to expect in a code. Education for physicians and nursing occurred hospital wide and at the unit level. Follow-up meetings were held with spiritual care to coach and to allow for feedback. The hospital code committee received feedback and followed up on any issues. EVALUATION/OUTCOMES:Family presence was instituted hospital-wide with success. Anecdotal reports of families telling the team that they could tell every effort had been made to save their loved one. Code team members and the spiritual care group became more comfortable in code situations. Staff members were more attune to the care that they provide and open communication with the family. Family presence allowed for discussion of the patients wishes and futile efforts. A number of families, once they visualize for them selves the stress that the code process has, stop any further efforts. Family presence during resuscitation is another step in providing excellent care to the people we serve.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
26-Oct-2011
Citation:
2010 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 19(3), e15-e28. doi:10.4037/ajcc2010866
Conference Date:
2010
Conference Name:
National Teaching Institute and Critical Care Exposition
Conference Host:
American Association of Critical-Care Nurses
Conference Location:
Washington, D.C., USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMaking Room: Family Presence During Resuscitation Supports a Healthy Work Environmenten_GB
dc.contributor.authorPrentice, Donnaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorDodds, Kellyen_GB
dc.contributor.authorWilliams, Jenniferen_GB
dc.author.detailsDonna Prentice, MSN,CCRN, Barnes-Jewish Hospital, Saint Louis, Missouri, USA, email: dxp7813@bjc.org; Kelly Dodds; Jennifer Williamsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157034-
dc.description.abstractPURPOSE: A large, urban, tertiary care hospital designed to provide family presence (FP) during resuscitation. The emergency department implemented FP in 2006 with great success. The Code Committee implemented FP during resuscitation in January 2009, throughout the hospital. FP during resuscitation has been shown to help meet the emotional needs of family members during a critical time and affords the family the opportunity to be kept informed, to be with their loved one, and to have closure. DESCRIPTION: A subcommittee of the hospital code committee was given charge to implement family presence. Spiritual Care services was identified as a consistent provider that was present for all codes. They were recruited to become the personnel to screen families and to become the guide and support for the family during the code. An algorithm was developed for the process. Tools were developed for family screening. Support from key groups (nursing administration, physicians, spiritual care) was obtained through literature review, conferencing, and experiential sharing. Education was provided for the spiritual care personnel regarding the screening process and what to expect in a code. Education for physicians and nursing occurred hospital wide and at the unit level. Follow-up meetings were held with spiritual care to coach and to allow for feedback. The hospital code committee received feedback and followed up on any issues. EVALUATION/OUTCOMES:Family presence was instituted hospital-wide with success. Anecdotal reports of families telling the team that they could tell every effort had been made to save their loved one. Code team members and the spiritual care group became more comfortable in code situations. Staff members were more attune to the care that they provide and open communication with the family. Family presence allowed for discussion of the patients wishes and futile efforts. A number of families, once they visualize for them selves the stress that the code process has, stop any further efforts. Family presence during resuscitation is another step in providing excellent care to the people we serve.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:21:44Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-26en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:21:44Z-
dc.identifier.citation2010 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 19(3), e15-e28. doi:10.4037/ajcc2010866en_GB
dc.conference.date2010en_GB
dc.conference.nameNational Teaching Institute and Critical Care Expositionen_GB
dc.conference.hostAmerican Association of Critical-Care Nursesen_GB
dc.conference.locationWashington, D.C., USAen_GB
dc.identifier.citation2010 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 19(3), e15-e28. doi:10.4037/ajcc2010866en_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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