Thou Shall Not Fall: Falls Reduction and Prevention Strategies for Patients in a Progressive Care Unit.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157036
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Thou Shall Not Fall: Falls Reduction and Prevention Strategies for Patients in a Progressive Care Unit.
Author(s):
Rankin, Tracey K.; Hatfield, Daniella
Author Details:
Tracey K. Rankin, RN,MSN, University of North Carolina Hospitals, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA, email: trankin@unch.unc.edu; Daniella Hatfield
Abstract:
PURPOSE: Patient falls are one of the leading causes of injuries in the hospital; they reduce mobility and independence, and increase morbidity and mortality. The cardiothoracic progressive care unit at UNC had an alarming increase in its falls rate average over a 6-month period, ranking it with the fourth highest falls rate average in the hospital, and above NDNQI averages for similar units. The nursing leadership team created strategies and education to help prevent patient falls on the unit. DESCRIPTION: Unit data were analyzed for key root causes of falls. These included a unit culture that promotes and encourages early postoperative ambulation; and a patient population in which 90% of patients are taking medications that affected cognition and mobility, such as PCAs. The leadership team appointed a staff nurse to the hospital's Falls Committee to bring back data, ideas, and best practices for fall reduction. Multiple fall prevention strategies were implemented simultaneously, including replacing single-sided grip socks with ones that had grips on both sides. Brightly colored signs were hung in the patient rooms that highlighted a stop sign and the words, "CALL! DonÆt Fall" printed in large font. Patients were encouraged to call for help before getting up and to wear their glasses to enhance visibility. Nursing staff checked the patients on hourly rounds to offer toileting and nutrition. Nursing staff was re-educated on the Morse Fall Scale and the use of yellow arm bracelets for patients at risk for falls. Documentation auditing was used for accountability and on-the-spot reinforcement by the leadership team. Finally, a bulletin board was created to highlight all falls prevention strategies and patient and family education resources. EVALUATION/OUTCOMES:Staff education and periodic auditing and reinforcement have increased staff awareness of our patients' risk of falling and methods for preventing falls. In turn, nursing staff make patients and their families aware of the danger and of the importance of calling for help before trying to get up. This education creates a sense of ownership for both staff and patients and families. Over a 14-month period, the cardiothoracic progressive care unitÆs falls rate average has decreased by 58% and the unit is now well below the hospitalÆs average and the NDNQI average for similar units.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
26-Oct-2011
Citation:
2010 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 19(3), e15-e28. doi:10.4037/ajcc2010866
Conference Date:
2010
Conference Name:
National Teaching Institute and Critical Care Exposition
Conference Host:
American Association of Critical-Care Nurses
Conference Location:
Washington, D.C., USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThou Shall Not Fall: Falls Reduction and Prevention Strategies for Patients in a Progressive Care Unit.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorRankin, Tracey K.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorHatfield, Daniellaen_GB
dc.author.detailsTracey K. Rankin, RN,MSN, University of North Carolina Hospitals, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA, email: trankin@unch.unc.edu; Daniella Hatfielden_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157036-
dc.description.abstractPURPOSE: Patient falls are one of the leading causes of injuries in the hospital; they reduce mobility and independence, and increase morbidity and mortality. The cardiothoracic progressive care unit at UNC had an alarming increase in its falls rate average over a 6-month period, ranking it with the fourth highest falls rate average in the hospital, and above NDNQI averages for similar units. The nursing leadership team created strategies and education to help prevent patient falls on the unit. DESCRIPTION: Unit data were analyzed for key root causes of falls. These included a unit culture that promotes and encourages early postoperative ambulation; and a patient population in which 90% of patients are taking medications that affected cognition and mobility, such as PCAs. The leadership team appointed a staff nurse to the hospital's Falls Committee to bring back data, ideas, and best practices for fall reduction. Multiple fall prevention strategies were implemented simultaneously, including replacing single-sided grip socks with ones that had grips on both sides. Brightly colored signs were hung in the patient rooms that highlighted a stop sign and the words, "CALL! DonÆt Fall" printed in large font. Patients were encouraged to call for help before getting up and to wear their glasses to enhance visibility. Nursing staff checked the patients on hourly rounds to offer toileting and nutrition. Nursing staff was re-educated on the Morse Fall Scale and the use of yellow arm bracelets for patients at risk for falls. Documentation auditing was used for accountability and on-the-spot reinforcement by the leadership team. Finally, a bulletin board was created to highlight all falls prevention strategies and patient and family education resources. EVALUATION/OUTCOMES:Staff education and periodic auditing and reinforcement have increased staff awareness of our patients' risk of falling and methods for preventing falls. In turn, nursing staff make patients and their families aware of the danger and of the importance of calling for help before trying to get up. This education creates a sense of ownership for both staff and patients and families. Over a 14-month period, the cardiothoracic progressive care unitÆs falls rate average has decreased by 58% and the unit is now well below the hospitalÆs average and the NDNQI average for similar units.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:21:50Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-26en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:21:50Z-
dc.identifier.citation2010 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 19(3), e15-e28. doi:10.4037/ajcc2010866en_GB
dc.conference.date2010en_GB
dc.conference.nameNational Teaching Institute and Critical Care Expositionen_GB
dc.conference.hostAmerican Association of Critical-Care Nursesen_GB
dc.conference.locationWashington, D.C., USAen_GB
dc.identifier.citation2010 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 19(3), e15-e28. doi:10.4037/ajcc2010866en_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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