Journey to a Healthy Work Place: AACN's Healthy Work Environments Initiative Provides Framework for Unit Transformation

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157038
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Journey to a Healthy Work Place: AACN's Healthy Work Environments Initiative Provides Framework for Unit Transformation
Author(s):
Rehak, Mary E.; Bruggeman, Karen; Schmaltz, Joyce; Lavelle, Julie; Bolgrean, Ronda; Stene, Janine
Author Details:
Mary E. Rehak, RN,CNS,MS,CCRN,CS,APRN-BC, MeritCare Health System, Fargo, North Dakota, USA, email: mary.rehak@meritcare.com; Karen Bruggeman; Joyce Schmaltz; Julie Lavelle; Ronda Bolgrean; Janine Stene
Abstract:
PURPOSE: In January 2008, on our cardiac intensive and progressive care units, issues from providers and unit staff surfaced regarding perceptions of care, practice changes, and system concerns. Established communication routes and work teams were being bypassed. The issues were unclear and dissatisfaction was expressed in terms of unit teamwork. The cardiothoracic interdisciplinary team members desired to use an evidence-based practice framework in structuring problem solving and team building. DESCRIPTION: A nurse-led multidisciplinary steering group reviewed the issues. The group determined team cohesiveness problems were affecting communication and collaboration efforts as well as patient care. Literature review included AACN's Healthy Work Environments (HWE) Initiative. The evidence demonstrated ineffective team function has the ability to negatively affect patient outcomes. AACN's HWE Initiative became our agreed on framework. Initial work focused only on the communication and collaboration standards. Staff input through surveys as well as information from NTI 2008 attendees expanded our work to include all 6 standards and additional staff involvement. Facilitated by steering group members, 4 work groups were formed around the HWE standards: skilled communication/true collaboration, effective decision making/ education, appropriate staffing/meaningful recognition, and authentic leadership. Staff was solicited in the fall of 2008 for a 3-month subgroup time commitment. Working synergistically, subgroups established goals and initiatives to address survey results. A logo to brand communications assisted in highlighting initiatives. Management financially supported meetings, class time, and recognition strategies. EVALUATION/OUTCOMES: Early metrics demonstrated gains in rounding efficiency and effectiveness. Initiatives receiving most positive response included personal accountability and Crucial Conversations classes, NTI attendance selection process, certification and length of service recognitions, combined charge nurse meetings, and representation at physician meetings. Patient satisfaction data showed gains in 8 of 11 measures. Groups continue to meet to build on our successes. We have presented our work to various audiences and are supported in moving our strategies forward as an organizational standard. The 4 four subgroups built around AACN HWE standards will be used to mentor our future sister units.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
26-Oct-2011
Citation:
2010 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 19(3), e15-e28. doi:10.4037/ajcc2010866
Conference Date:
2010
Conference Name:
National Teaching Institute and Critical Care Exposition
Conference Host:
American Association of Critical-Care Nurses
Conference Location:
Washington, D.C., USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleJourney to a Healthy Work Place: AACN's Healthy Work Environments Initiative Provides Framework for Unit Transformationen_GB
dc.contributor.authorRehak, Mary E.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorBruggeman, Karenen_GB
dc.contributor.authorSchmaltz, Joyceen_GB
dc.contributor.authorLavelle, Julieen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBolgrean, Rondaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorStene, Janineen_GB
dc.author.detailsMary E. Rehak, RN,CNS,MS,CCRN,CS,APRN-BC, MeritCare Health System, Fargo, North Dakota, USA, email: mary.rehak@meritcare.com; Karen Bruggeman; Joyce Schmaltz; Julie Lavelle; Ronda Bolgrean; Janine Steneen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157038-
dc.description.abstractPURPOSE: In January 2008, on our cardiac intensive and progressive care units, issues from providers and unit staff surfaced regarding perceptions of care, practice changes, and system concerns. Established communication routes and work teams were being bypassed. The issues were unclear and dissatisfaction was expressed in terms of unit teamwork. The cardiothoracic interdisciplinary team members desired to use an evidence-based practice framework in structuring problem solving and team building. DESCRIPTION: A nurse-led multidisciplinary steering group reviewed the issues. The group determined team cohesiveness problems were affecting communication and collaboration efforts as well as patient care. Literature review included AACN's Healthy Work Environments (HWE) Initiative. The evidence demonstrated ineffective team function has the ability to negatively affect patient outcomes. AACN's HWE Initiative became our agreed on framework. Initial work focused only on the communication and collaboration standards. Staff input through surveys as well as information from NTI 2008 attendees expanded our work to include all 6 standards and additional staff involvement. Facilitated by steering group members, 4 work groups were formed around the HWE standards: skilled communication/true collaboration, effective decision making/ education, appropriate staffing/meaningful recognition, and authentic leadership. Staff was solicited in the fall of 2008 for a 3-month subgroup time commitment. Working synergistically, subgroups established goals and initiatives to address survey results. A logo to brand communications assisted in highlighting initiatives. Management financially supported meetings, class time, and recognition strategies. EVALUATION/OUTCOMES: Early metrics demonstrated gains in rounding efficiency and effectiveness. Initiatives receiving most positive response included personal accountability and Crucial Conversations classes, NTI attendance selection process, certification and length of service recognitions, combined charge nurse meetings, and representation at physician meetings. Patient satisfaction data showed gains in 8 of 11 measures. Groups continue to meet to build on our successes. We have presented our work to various audiences and are supported in moving our strategies forward as an organizational standard. The 4 four subgroups built around AACN HWE standards will be used to mentor our future sister units.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:21:57Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-26en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:21:57Z-
dc.identifier.citation2010 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 19(3), e15-e28. doi:10.4037/ajcc2010866en_GB
dc.conference.date2010en_GB
dc.conference.nameNational Teaching Institute and Critical Care Expositionen_GB
dc.conference.hostAmerican Association of Critical-Care Nursesen_GB
dc.conference.locationWashington, D.C., USAen_GB
dc.identifier.citation2010 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 19(3), e15-e28. doi:10.4037/ajcc2010866en_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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