2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157039
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A New Screening Strategy Detects Sepsis and Prevents Septic Shock
Author(s):
Riske, Jillian P; Butz, Michael
Author Details:
Jillian P. Riske, RN, St. David's Medical Center, Austin, Texas, USA, email: jillriske@gmail.com; Michael Butz
Abstract:
PURPOSE: Although sepsis is a preventable condition with identifiable warning signs, it remains the 10th leading cause of death in the United States. The purpose of this 4-step screening process is to provide a simple tool for early detection, thereby decreasing incidence of septic shock and reducing the total number of deaths. DESCRIPTION: This simple screening tool provides step-by-step analysis of a patientÆs vital signs and laboratory data that collectively identifies infection and sepsis. Step 1 screens for systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS). This step looks at heart rate, temperature, respirations, and white blood cell count. If 2 or more of these indicators fall outside of the accepted parameters then the patient is considered positive for SIRS, the nurse should proceed to step 2, screening for infection. Following determination of infection, step 3 requires screening for organ dysfunction. Once all 3 steps have been positively determined, severe sepsis is occurring, which prompts the nurse to notify a doctor using SBAR (Situation, Background, Assessment, and Recommendation). The recommendations include interventions such as fluid resuscitation, obtaining laboratory values (lactate level, complete blood count, and arterial blood gases), or calling the rapid response team. The screen was implemented by the nursing staff in an 18-bed intermediate care unit and was completed on each patient at the beginning of their shift. EVALUATION/OUTCOMES:To evaluate this methodology, nurses collected data over a 5-month period, with an average data sample of 85 patients per month. In the first month, 8% of patients screened positive for severe sepsis. Although the number of patients who screened positive for infection remained constant, the percentage screening positive for severe sepsis lessened each month to 0%, 1%, 2%, and 4%, respectively. By detecting SIRS and infection in patients before onset of severe sepsis, treatment occurs earlier, in turn reducing the number of patients who test positive for severe sepsis. Additionally, early detection and treatment prevented the transfer of patients to the intensive care unit.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
26-Oct-2011
Citation:
2010 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 19(3), e15-e28. doi:10.4037/ajcc2010866
Conference Date:
2010
Conference Name:
National Teaching Institute and Critical Care Exposition
Conference Host:
American Association of Critical-Care Nurses
Conference Location:
Washington, D.C., USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA New Screening Strategy Detects Sepsis and Prevents Septic Shocken_GB
dc.contributor.authorRiske, Jillian Pen_GB
dc.contributor.authorButz, Michaelen_GB
dc.author.detailsJillian P. Riske, RN, St. David's Medical Center, Austin, Texas, USA, email: jillriske@gmail.com; Michael Butzen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157039-
dc.description.abstractPURPOSE: Although sepsis is a preventable condition with identifiable warning signs, it remains the 10th leading cause of death in the United States. The purpose of this 4-step screening process is to provide a simple tool for early detection, thereby decreasing incidence of septic shock and reducing the total number of deaths. DESCRIPTION: This simple screening tool provides step-by-step analysis of a patientÆs vital signs and laboratory data that collectively identifies infection and sepsis. Step 1 screens for systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS). This step looks at heart rate, temperature, respirations, and white blood cell count. If 2 or more of these indicators fall outside of the accepted parameters then the patient is considered positive for SIRS, the nurse should proceed to step 2, screening for infection. Following determination of infection, step 3 requires screening for organ dysfunction. Once all 3 steps have been positively determined, severe sepsis is occurring, which prompts the nurse to notify a doctor using SBAR (Situation, Background, Assessment, and Recommendation). The recommendations include interventions such as fluid resuscitation, obtaining laboratory values (lactate level, complete blood count, and arterial blood gases), or calling the rapid response team. The screen was implemented by the nursing staff in an 18-bed intermediate care unit and was completed on each patient at the beginning of their shift. EVALUATION/OUTCOMES:To evaluate this methodology, nurses collected data over a 5-month period, with an average data sample of 85 patients per month. In the first month, 8% of patients screened positive for severe sepsis. Although the number of patients who screened positive for infection remained constant, the percentage screening positive for severe sepsis lessened each month to 0%, 1%, 2%, and 4%, respectively. By detecting SIRS and infection in patients before onset of severe sepsis, treatment occurs earlier, in turn reducing the number of patients who test positive for severe sepsis. Additionally, early detection and treatment prevented the transfer of patients to the intensive care unit.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:22:01Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-26en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:22:01Z-
dc.identifier.citation2010 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 19(3), e15-e28. doi:10.4037/ajcc2010866en_GB
dc.conference.date2010en_GB
dc.conference.nameNational Teaching Institute and Critical Care Expositionen_GB
dc.conference.hostAmerican Association of Critical-Care Nursesen_GB
dc.conference.locationWashington, D.C., USAen_GB
dc.identifier.citation2010 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 19(3), e15-e28. doi:10.4037/ajcc2010866en_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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