2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157042
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Maintaining VAD Competency on a Progressive Care Unit
Author(s):
Russell, Jules J.; Hoke, Linda; Arthur, Belinda
Author Details:
Jules J. Russell, RN,BSN,BA,PCCN, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA, email: jjruss63@comcast.net; Linda Hoke; Belinda Arthur
Abstract:
PURPOSE: Healthy work environment is top priority in this climate of quality nursing care. Our 48-bed progressive cardiac care unit provides nursing care to patients with mechanical circulatory support devices as a bridge to transplant with 5 different types of ventricular assist devices (VADs) and the total artificial heart (TAH). Our shared governance committee rolled out a plan to ensure all 67 nurses received sufficient training to maintain a high level of competency with all the devices. DESCRIPTION: Classroom training for our nurses included training from corporate vendors with new VAD protocols and the VAD coordinators providing 4 or 8 hours classes for new nurses. However, maintaining competency for all 6 devices was a challenge. Each nurse on the unit was interviewed to determine baseline knowledge and comfort level for each device. A spread sheet was generated with each device, the nurseÆs name, experience, comfort level, training time, and shadow experience. Additionally, the spreadsheet had a date log to record the days and hours each nurse was assigned to a particular device ensuring an even distribution of patient assignments. The charge nurse referred to the spreadsheet when making assignments for patients with devices, making an effort to rotate nurses needing hands-on practice or with an experienced nurse providing support. Nurses on orientation were assigned with an experienced VAD preceptor when learning each machine. Additional resources available to our nurses included VAD coordinators on call to answer questions, Power Point presentations on our unit Web site for each device as a quick reference guide, and manuals provided by the manufacturer. EVALUATION/OUTCOMES:Understanding the key concepts of the VAD operation is essential to effectively evaluate patient status and intervene appropriately when changes occur. Our efforts to educate nurses in the classroom, provide hands-on experience, and maintain competency have been successful. We continue to track experience and confidence of our nurses. The spreadsheet is kept in the charge nurse book so assignments can be rotated. Nurses continue to rotate care with the introduction of a new device. We maintain high patient satisfaction scores and successfully passed the Joint Commission inspection specifically for care of the patient with a VAD or TAH device.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
26-Oct-2011
Citation:
2010 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 19(3), e15-e28. doi:10.4037/ajcc2010866
Conference Date:
2010
Conference Name:
National Teaching Institute and Critical Care Exposition
Conference Host:
American Association of Critical-Care Nurses
Conference Location:
Washington, D.C., USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMaintaining VAD Competency on a Progressive Care Uniten_GB
dc.contributor.authorRussell, Jules J.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorHoke, Lindaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorArthur, Belindaen_GB
dc.author.detailsJules J. Russell, RN,BSN,BA,PCCN, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA, email: jjruss63@comcast.net; Linda Hoke; Belinda Arthuren_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157042-
dc.description.abstractPURPOSE: Healthy work environment is top priority in this climate of quality nursing care. Our 48-bed progressive cardiac care unit provides nursing care to patients with mechanical circulatory support devices as a bridge to transplant with 5 different types of ventricular assist devices (VADs) and the total artificial heart (TAH). Our shared governance committee rolled out a plan to ensure all 67 nurses received sufficient training to maintain a high level of competency with all the devices. DESCRIPTION: Classroom training for our nurses included training from corporate vendors with new VAD protocols and the VAD coordinators providing 4 or 8 hours classes for new nurses. However, maintaining competency for all 6 devices was a challenge. Each nurse on the unit was interviewed to determine baseline knowledge and comfort level for each device. A spread sheet was generated with each device, the nurseÆs name, experience, comfort level, training time, and shadow experience. Additionally, the spreadsheet had a date log to record the days and hours each nurse was assigned to a particular device ensuring an even distribution of patient assignments. The charge nurse referred to the spreadsheet when making assignments for patients with devices, making an effort to rotate nurses needing hands-on practice or with an experienced nurse providing support. Nurses on orientation were assigned with an experienced VAD preceptor when learning each machine. Additional resources available to our nurses included VAD coordinators on call to answer questions, Power Point presentations on our unit Web site for each device as a quick reference guide, and manuals provided by the manufacturer. EVALUATION/OUTCOMES:Understanding the key concepts of the VAD operation is essential to effectively evaluate patient status and intervene appropriately when changes occur. Our efforts to educate nurses in the classroom, provide hands-on experience, and maintain competency have been successful. We continue to track experience and confidence of our nurses. The spreadsheet is kept in the charge nurse book so assignments can be rotated. Nurses continue to rotate care with the introduction of a new device. We maintain high patient satisfaction scores and successfully passed the Joint Commission inspection specifically for care of the patient with a VAD or TAH device.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:22:11Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-26en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:22:11Z-
dc.identifier.citation2010 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 19(3), e15-e28. doi:10.4037/ajcc2010866en_GB
dc.conference.date2010en_GB
dc.conference.nameNational Teaching Institute and Critical Care Expositionen_GB
dc.conference.hostAmerican Association of Critical-Care Nursesen_GB
dc.conference.locationWashington, D.C., USAen_GB
dc.identifier.citation2010 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 19(3), e15-e28. doi:10.4037/ajcc2010866en_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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