Attitudes and Perceptions of Multidisciplinary Team Members Toward Family Presence at Bedside Rounds

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157045
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Attitudes and Perceptions of Multidisciplinary Team Members Toward Family Presence at Bedside Rounds
Author(s):
Santiago, Cecilia C.
Author Details:
Cecilia C. Santiago, St. Michael's Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, email: santiagoc@smh.toronto.on.ca
Abstract:
POSTER PURPOSE: To describe the current attitudes and perceptions of managers, critical care physicians, fellows, nurses, and allied health care providers toward the presence of family members at bedside rounds and to compare responses among health care providers. BACKGROUND/SIGNIFICANCE:Traditionally, family members of patients in intensive care units (ICUs) have not been invited to be present at bedside rounds, and few ICUs have formal policies on this issue. Little has been published on the topic; the American College of Critical Care Medicine Task Force considers family presence at bedside rounds to be one of the least studied issues. The task force acknowledges the desire of families to play a larger role in decision making and underscores the benefits of family participation in rounds. Although desirable, the practice is met with ambivalence. The specific reasons for this ambivalence have not been well delineated. We conducted a self-administered survey of health care practitioners to ascertain their attitudes and perceptions toward family presence at bedside rounds. METHOD: We developed, tested, and administered a questionnaire to the multidisciplinary staff of a medical-surgical ICU using mainly ordinal response formats. We compared responses among health care provider groups by using the 2 test. RESULTS: A total of 160/221 (72.4%) persons completed the questionnaire. Comparing physicians (MDs) and registered nurses (RNs) with others, we found that significantly more MDs and RNs strongly disagreed that family members should be present at bedside rounds more than 48 hours after ICU admission (P = .007), with more RNs than MDs strongly or somewhat disagreeing with family members being present during the initial 48-hour period (P = .004). Compared with less experienced RNs, more experienced RNs strongly disagreed that family members should be given the option to attend bedside rounds within (P = .02) and beyond 48 hours (P = .03) of ICU admission and strongly agreed that family presence would constrain how negative medical information was conveyed early in the ICU stay (P = .02). CONCLUSIONS: We found significant differences among health care providers toward family presence at bedside rounds, with RNs-especially more experienced RNs-expressing the greatest reservation. The research is novel in exploring the attitudes and perceptions of staff toward family presence at bedside rounds in an adult ICU. Additional research is required to explore reasons why health care providers, specifically experienced RNs, express reservations regarding family presence at bedside rounds.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
26-Oct-2011
Citation:
2010 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 19(3), e15-e28. doi:10.4037/ajcc2010866
Conference Date:
2010
Conference Name:
National Teaching Institute and Critical Care Exposition
Conference Host:
American Association of Critical-Care Nurses
Conference Location:
Washington, D.C., USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAttitudes and Perceptions of Multidisciplinary Team Members Toward Family Presence at Bedside Roundsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorSantiago, Cecilia C.en_GB
dc.author.detailsCecilia C. Santiago, St. Michael's Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, email: santiagoc@smh.toronto.on.caen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157045-
dc.description.abstractPOSTER PURPOSE: To describe the current attitudes and perceptions of managers, critical care physicians, fellows, nurses, and allied health care providers toward the presence of family members at bedside rounds and to compare responses among health care providers. BACKGROUND/SIGNIFICANCE:Traditionally, family members of patients in intensive care units (ICUs) have not been invited to be present at bedside rounds, and few ICUs have formal policies on this issue. Little has been published on the topic; the American College of Critical Care Medicine Task Force considers family presence at bedside rounds to be one of the least studied issues. The task force acknowledges the desire of families to play a larger role in decision making and underscores the benefits of family participation in rounds. Although desirable, the practice is met with ambivalence. The specific reasons for this ambivalence have not been well delineated. We conducted a self-administered survey of health care practitioners to ascertain their attitudes and perceptions toward family presence at bedside rounds. METHOD: We developed, tested, and administered a questionnaire to the multidisciplinary staff of a medical-surgical ICU using mainly ordinal response formats. We compared responses among health care provider groups by using the 2 test. RESULTS: A total of 160/221 (72.4%) persons completed the questionnaire. Comparing physicians (MDs) and registered nurses (RNs) with others, we found that significantly more MDs and RNs strongly disagreed that family members should be present at bedside rounds more than 48 hours after ICU admission (P = .007), with more RNs than MDs strongly or somewhat disagreeing with family members being present during the initial 48-hour period (P = .004). Compared with less experienced RNs, more experienced RNs strongly disagreed that family members should be given the option to attend bedside rounds within (P = .02) and beyond 48 hours (P = .03) of ICU admission and strongly agreed that family presence would constrain how negative medical information was conveyed early in the ICU stay (P = .02). CONCLUSIONS: We found significant differences among health care providers toward family presence at bedside rounds, with RNs-especially more experienced RNs-expressing the greatest reservation. The research is novel in exploring the attitudes and perceptions of staff toward family presence at bedside rounds in an adult ICU. Additional research is required to explore reasons why health care providers, specifically experienced RNs, express reservations regarding family presence at bedside rounds.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:22:21Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-26en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:22:21Z-
dc.identifier.citation2010 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 19(3), e15-e28. doi:10.4037/ajcc2010866en_GB
dc.conference.date2010en_GB
dc.conference.nameNational Teaching Institute and Critical Care Expositionen_GB
dc.conference.hostAmerican Association of Critical-Care Nursesen_GB
dc.conference.locationWashington, D.C., USAen_GB
dc.identifier.citation2010 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 19(3), e15-e28. doi:10.4037/ajcc2010866en_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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