2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157049
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Mentoring With Intention: Helping New Charge Nurses Become Successful Leaders
Author(s):
Schulz, Karen J.; Boespflug, Jeanne
Author Details:
Karen J. Schulz, RN,MSN,CCRN, Mercy Hospital, Coon Rapids, Minnesota, USA, email: karen.schulz@allina.com; Jeanne Boespflug
Abstract:
PURPOSE: Charge nurses face many difficult challenges including barriers to patient and staff safety, information management, staffing issues, and resource allocation responsibilities. A healthy work environment with successful daily unit operation is dependent on a leadership model that mentors staff nurses to become skillful charges nurses. The goal of this project was to design a cost-effective and user-friendly mentorship program to enhance the successful transition from staff nurse to charge nurse. DESCRIPTION: The charge nurse mentorship program was designed by one core ICU charge nurse and the unit-based educator. The remaining core charge nurses and unit-based manager collaborated in the development of educational content and mentor-mentee expectations. The mentorship framework includes a 4-hour round-table discussion, 32 mentored hours by a core charge nurse, and consistently working charge for 3 weeks with a designated core charge nurse resource. Lists of educational topics were generated, prioritized, and designated to be reviewed as a table-top exercise or a mentored-experience. Table-top items include healthy work environment expectations, budget and hours per patient day considerations, staffing matrixes, patient acuity, labor/contractual obligations, conflict resolution, emergency-preparedness responsibilities, physician-nurse collaboration, and regulatory requirements. Mentored experiences include using the synergy model to make assignments, interdepartmental collaboration, computer-based patient placement programs, pagers, equipment checklists, and quality improvement processes. One key element of project involved using the unit manager as one of the mentors. EVALUATION/OUTCOMES:New charge nurses felt well prepared for the new leadership responsibilities. Preparedness was validated by the mentors in the following categories: awareness of role responsibilities, appropriate resource utilization, effective decision-making processes, seeing the "big picture" on the unit/hospital level, assignment making that matched nurse skill with patient acuity, and adaptability in the ever changing fast-paced culture of the ICU. Comments from the ICU staff included "the unit runs smoothly under their lead." The nurse manager expressed that she had confidence the new charge nurses maintained a healthy work environment in her absence.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
26-Oct-2011
Citation:
2010 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 19(3), e15-e28. doi:10.4037/ajcc2010866
Conference Date:
2010
Conference Name:
National Teaching Institute and Critical Care Exposition
Conference Host:
American Association of Critical-Care Nurses
Conference Location:
Washington, D.C., USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMentoring With Intention: Helping New Charge Nurses Become Successful Leadersen_GB
dc.contributor.authorSchulz, Karen J.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorBoespflug, Jeanneen_GB
dc.author.detailsKaren J. Schulz, RN,MSN,CCRN, Mercy Hospital, Coon Rapids, Minnesota, USA, email: karen.schulz@allina.com; Jeanne Boespflugen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157049-
dc.description.abstractPURPOSE: Charge nurses face many difficult challenges including barriers to patient and staff safety, information management, staffing issues, and resource allocation responsibilities. A healthy work environment with successful daily unit operation is dependent on a leadership model that mentors staff nurses to become skillful charges nurses. The goal of this project was to design a cost-effective and user-friendly mentorship program to enhance the successful transition from staff nurse to charge nurse. DESCRIPTION: The charge nurse mentorship program was designed by one core ICU charge nurse and the unit-based educator. The remaining core charge nurses and unit-based manager collaborated in the development of educational content and mentor-mentee expectations. The mentorship framework includes a 4-hour round-table discussion, 32 mentored hours by a core charge nurse, and consistently working charge for 3 weeks with a designated core charge nurse resource. Lists of educational topics were generated, prioritized, and designated to be reviewed as a table-top exercise or a mentored-experience. Table-top items include healthy work environment expectations, budget and hours per patient day considerations, staffing matrixes, patient acuity, labor/contractual obligations, conflict resolution, emergency-preparedness responsibilities, physician-nurse collaboration, and regulatory requirements. Mentored experiences include using the synergy model to make assignments, interdepartmental collaboration, computer-based patient placement programs, pagers, equipment checklists, and quality improvement processes. One key element of project involved using the unit manager as one of the mentors. EVALUATION/OUTCOMES:New charge nurses felt well prepared for the new leadership responsibilities. Preparedness was validated by the mentors in the following categories: awareness of role responsibilities, appropriate resource utilization, effective decision-making processes, seeing the "big picture" on the unit/hospital level, assignment making that matched nurse skill with patient acuity, and adaptability in the ever changing fast-paced culture of the ICU. Comments from the ICU staff included "the unit runs smoothly under their lead." The nurse manager expressed that she had confidence the new charge nurses maintained a healthy work environment in her absence.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:22:34Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-26en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:22:34Z-
dc.identifier.citation2010 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 19(3), e15-e28. doi:10.4037/ajcc2010866en_GB
dc.conference.date2010en_GB
dc.conference.nameNational Teaching Institute and Critical Care Expositionen_GB
dc.conference.hostAmerican Association of Critical-Care Nursesen_GB
dc.conference.locationWashington, D.C., USAen_GB
dc.identifier.citation2010 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 19(3), e15-e28. doi:10.4037/ajcc2010866en_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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