2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157050
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The "Dot" Board: An Accountability Chart for Mandatory Competencies and Requirements
Abstract:
The "Dot" Board: An Accountability Chart for Mandatory Competencies and Requirements
Conference Sponsor:American Association of Critical-Care Nurses
Conference Year:2010
Author:Schumaker-Watt, Jo Ann, RN,BS,BSN,CCRN
P.I. Institution Name:Stanford Hospital and Clinics
Contact Address:, Stanford, CA, USA
Co-Authors:Agnes Monteclaro
[2010 National Teaching Institute Creative Solutions abstract. Crit Care Nurse. 2010;30(2):e1-e45] PURPOSE: To increase staff participation, accountability, and transparency in completion of competencies and clinical requirements in the ICU. Our intention was to make this fun, colorful, and easy to interpret while meeting regulatory requirements to support a culture of nurse autonomy and patient safety. DESCRIPTION: The challenge was to implement a process whereby 180 nursing staff could readily identify their individual progress in completing the 17 annual/biennial mandatory ICU competencies/requirements such as high-risk/low-volume equipment, stroke and trauma education, and regulatory online training modules. Under the previous system, it was difficult for nurses to access this information because it was filed in multiple binders in the manager's office, placing the primary documentation responsibility with the unit managers/educators. To solve this issue, the unit educators created a large (3 ft x 5 ft), laminated poster to display in the corridor next to the ICU break room. The poster functions as an annual report card. Staff members' names are listed vertically and competencies/requirements are listed horizontally across the top of the poster. Each vertical column (competency) has a different brightly shaded color. When a nurse completes a competency, a color-coded sticky dot is placed in the appropriate column corresponding to their name. When a nurse has completed all 17 competencies/requirements, they receive a colored star by their name. The poster location was selected to be visible to staff nurses but not to visitors. EVALUATION/OUTCOMES: Since initiation in January 2008, nurses are in healthy competition to earn dots to fill in the "report card." Ninety of our nurses responded to a short survey with 98% positive responses: "I look at it frequently to make sure I'm up to date. ItÆs a great tool to be responsible for yourself all on one board," "I love the star when I get all my dots." On December 1, 2007, there were 102 equipment competencies outstanding compared to 36 on December 1, 2008, thus greatly reducing end of year follow-up by unit educators/ management. The poster has also generated more questions about available classes and/or conferences to earn mandatory stroke and trauma hours.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
26-Oct-2011
Citation:
2010 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 19(3), e15-e28. doi:10.4037/ajcc2010866
Conference Date:
2010
Conference Name:
National Teaching Institute and Critical Care Exposition
Conference Host:
American Association of Critical-Care Nurses
Conference Location:
Washington, D.C., USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe "Dot" Board: An Accountability Chart for Mandatory Competencies and Requirementsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157050-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The "Dot" Board: An Accountability Chart for Mandatory Competencies and Requirements</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">American Association of Critical-Care Nurses</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Schumaker-Watt, Jo Ann, RN,BS,BSN,CCRN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Stanford Hospital and Clinics</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">, Stanford, CA, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">joannswatt@hotmail.com</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Agnes Monteclaro</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[2010 National Teaching Institute Creative Solutions abstract. Crit Care Nurse. 2010;30(2):e1-e45] PURPOSE: To increase staff participation, accountability, and transparency in completion of competencies and clinical requirements in the ICU. Our intention was to make this fun, colorful, and easy to interpret while meeting regulatory requirements to support a culture of nurse autonomy and patient safety. DESCRIPTION: The challenge was to implement a process whereby 180 nursing staff could readily identify their individual progress in completing the 17 annual/biennial mandatory ICU competencies/requirements such as high-risk/low-volume equipment, stroke and trauma education, and regulatory online training modules. Under the previous system, it was difficult for nurses to access this information because it was filed in multiple binders in the manager's office, placing the primary documentation responsibility with the unit managers/educators. To solve this issue, the unit educators created a large (3 ft x 5 ft), laminated poster to display in the corridor next to the ICU break room. The poster functions as an annual report card. Staff members' names are listed vertically and competencies/requirements are listed horizontally across the top of the poster. Each vertical column (competency) has a different brightly shaded color. When a nurse completes a competency, a color-coded sticky dot is placed in the appropriate column corresponding to their name. When a nurse has completed all 17 competencies/requirements, they receive a colored star by their name. The poster location was selected to be visible to staff nurses but not to visitors. EVALUATION/OUTCOMES: Since initiation in January 2008, nurses are in healthy competition to earn dots to fill in the "report card." Ninety of our nurses responded to a short survey with 98% positive responses: "I look at it frequently to make sure I'm up to date. It&AElig;s a great tool to be responsible for yourself all on one board," "I love the star when I get all my dots." On December 1, 2007, there were 102 equipment competencies outstanding compared to 36 on December 1, 2008, thus greatly reducing end of year follow-up by unit educators/ management. The poster has also generated more questions about available classes and/or conferences to earn mandatory stroke and trauma hours.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:22:37Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-26en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:22:37Z-
dc.identifier.citation2010 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 19(3), e15-e28. doi:10.4037/ajcc2010866en_GB
dc.conference.date2010en_GB
dc.conference.nameNational Teaching Institute and Critical Care Expositionen_GB
dc.conference.hostAmerican Association of Critical-Care Nursesen_GB
dc.conference.locationWashington, D.C., USAen_GB
dc.identifier.citation2010 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 19(3), e15-e28. doi:10.4037/ajcc2010866en_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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