Making a Positive Impact: Staff Driven Initiative to Enhance Unit Based Nursing Skills Competency Revalidation

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157054
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Making a Positive Impact: Staff Driven Initiative to Enhance Unit Based Nursing Skills Competency Revalidation
Author(s):
Sudar, Patricia; LeBlanc, Paul; Podolle, Faryl; Burroughs, Rose; Dickerson, Laura
Author Details:
Patricia Sudar, RN,BN, Duke University Hospital, Durham, North Carolina, USA, email: dukern@bellsouth.net; Paul LeBlanc; Faryl Podolle; Rose Burroughs; Laura Dickerson
Abstract:
PURPOSE: Advanced clinical nurses identified an ineffective coordination of efforts to revalidate annual nursing competencies at the unit level. The goal of this initiative was to coordinate, develop, and implement a monthly competency revalidation continuum for the unit nursing staff. Inconsistent compliance with hospital expectations and escalating staff dissatisfaction were the primary reasons for revamping the nursing skills revalidation process. DESCRIPTION: Establishing the committee was a collaborative effort between advanced clinical nurses and unit leadership. Using the clinical expertise and knowledge of these nurses, a conceptual framework was developed. This framework challenged the traditional method of yearly revalidation to monthly revalidation. Nurses guided the process that allowed staff to complete nursing competency revalidation on a cyclical basis. In past years, staff was required to attend revalidation on unscheduled workdays. This resulted in staff dissatisfaction and negatively affected the unit budget. Developing a framework compliant with hospital- and unit-based requirements for annual competencies, staff was able to complete the required components during their shift. The curriculum was based on current hospital policies, protocols, and incident safety reports. The information was presented in 2 designs: hands-on and written format, addressing the needs of visual and tactile learners. Hands-on learning enabled staff to demonstrate knowledge of equipment, allowing time for practice and direction with advanced clinical nurses. Bulletin board postings and reference guides provided information while completing the written assessment tool. EVALUATION/OUTCOMES:Staff survey results indicated that monthly competencies decreased anxiety with revalidation and increased ability to comprehend knowledge. We also gauged staff satisfaction through results of NDNQI and work culture surveys. Staff gained a greater familiarity of safety issues pertaining to our patient population. Staff increased their ability to incorporate policy and procedure guidelines into daily practice. One hundred percent participation was achieved in hands-on learning and the written portion. Six months after implementation, data revealed a significant decrease in adverse drug events. Staff was provided with confidential remediation and expressed satisfaction with this process.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
26-Oct-2011
Citation:
2010 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 19(3), e15-e28. doi:10.4037/ajcc2010866
Conference Date:
2010
Conference Name:
National Teaching Institute and Critical Care Exposition
Conference Host:
American Association of Critical-Care Nurses
Conference Location:
Washington, D.C., USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMaking a Positive Impact: Staff Driven Initiative to Enhance Unit Based Nursing Skills Competency Revalidationen_GB
dc.contributor.authorSudar, Patriciaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorLeBlanc, Paulen_GB
dc.contributor.authorPodolle, Farylen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBurroughs, Roseen_GB
dc.contributor.authorDickerson, Lauraen_GB
dc.author.detailsPatricia Sudar, RN,BN, Duke University Hospital, Durham, North Carolina, USA, email: dukern@bellsouth.net; Paul LeBlanc; Faryl Podolle; Rose Burroughs; Laura Dickersonen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157054-
dc.description.abstractPURPOSE: Advanced clinical nurses identified an ineffective coordination of efforts to revalidate annual nursing competencies at the unit level. The goal of this initiative was to coordinate, develop, and implement a monthly competency revalidation continuum for the unit nursing staff. Inconsistent compliance with hospital expectations and escalating staff dissatisfaction were the primary reasons for revamping the nursing skills revalidation process. DESCRIPTION: Establishing the committee was a collaborative effort between advanced clinical nurses and unit leadership. Using the clinical expertise and knowledge of these nurses, a conceptual framework was developed. This framework challenged the traditional method of yearly revalidation to monthly revalidation. Nurses guided the process that allowed staff to complete nursing competency revalidation on a cyclical basis. In past years, staff was required to attend revalidation on unscheduled workdays. This resulted in staff dissatisfaction and negatively affected the unit budget. Developing a framework compliant with hospital- and unit-based requirements for annual competencies, staff was able to complete the required components during their shift. The curriculum was based on current hospital policies, protocols, and incident safety reports. The information was presented in 2 designs: hands-on and written format, addressing the needs of visual and tactile learners. Hands-on learning enabled staff to demonstrate knowledge of equipment, allowing time for practice and direction with advanced clinical nurses. Bulletin board postings and reference guides provided information while completing the written assessment tool. EVALUATION/OUTCOMES:Staff survey results indicated that monthly competencies decreased anxiety with revalidation and increased ability to comprehend knowledge. We also gauged staff satisfaction through results of NDNQI and work culture surveys. Staff gained a greater familiarity of safety issues pertaining to our patient population. Staff increased their ability to incorporate policy and procedure guidelines into daily practice. One hundred percent participation was achieved in hands-on learning and the written portion. Six months after implementation, data revealed a significant decrease in adverse drug events. Staff was provided with confidential remediation and expressed satisfaction with this process.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:22:51Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-26en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:22:51Z-
dc.identifier.citation2010 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 19(3), e15-e28. doi:10.4037/ajcc2010866en_GB
dc.conference.date2010en_GB
dc.conference.nameNational Teaching Institute and Critical Care Expositionen_GB
dc.conference.hostAmerican Association of Critical-Care Nursesen_GB
dc.conference.locationWashington, D.C., USAen_GB
dc.identifier.citation2010 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 19(3), e15-e28. doi:10.4037/ajcc2010866en_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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