2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157056
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Isolation Status Does Not Impact the Functional Outcome of Surgical IMC Patients
Author(s):
Swoboda, Sandra; Lipsett, Pamela
Author Details:
Sandra Swoboda, RN,MS, Johns Hopkins, Baltimore, Maryland, USA, email: sswoboda@jhmi.edu; Pamela Lipsett
Abstract:
POSTER PURPOSE: To determine whether isolation for infection control has an impact on the functional outcome (FO) of patients in a surgical intermediate care unit (SIMC) compared with patients who are not isolated as measured by the Short Form health survey (SF-20). BACKGROUND/SIGNIFICANCE:Isolation is routinely used to prevent the spread of drug-resistant infection. Evidence suggests that isolated patients receive inferior care and have fewer interactions with health care workers than nonisolated patients; thus it is unknown whether this has an effect on the patientsÆ long-term FO. The SF-20 measures 6 health domains: physical, pain, role function, social function, mental health, and health perception. It is quick and easy to use, and it reports the patientsÆ perception of their current health status. METHOD: As part of a prospective study examining the impact of isolation status on the process of care in SIMC patients with a length of stay (LOS) >2 days, we administered the SF-20 at serial time points to determine FO: at baseline (for prehospital status), at SIMC admission, at hospital discharge, and at 1 and 3 months after discharge). Patients were grouped by isolation status. Both t tests and longitudinal data analysis were performed and sample size power was calculated; significance was P < .05. RESULTS: Over 5 months, 104 patients (28 isolated, 76 nonisolated) had a LOS > 2 days, and 36 patients consented to participate (14 isolated, 22 nonisolated). No significant differences were found between groups in demographics, underlying medical diseases, APACHE II score, or SIMC or hospital LOS. The mean SF-20 score was not different between isolated vs non-isolated groups at baseline (54 vs 61; P = .43), discharge (37 vs 37; P = .97), 1 month (40 vs 42; P = .77), and 3 months (42 vs 52; P = .23). Physical component scores decreased in both groups from baseline to hospital discharge (P > .20). The overall health perception of patients in both groups declined from baseline but had returned to baseline levels by 3 months (P=.24). CONCLUSIONS: Total SF-20 scores decline during hospitalization and slowly return to prehospital range by 3 months after discharge (physical and role categories are affected the most). Because the study was underpowered (0.11), we could not prove that isolation status had an influence on any aspect of FO. However, these data can be used in discharge planning and interventions for recovery from surgical illness.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
26-Oct-2011
Citation:
2010 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 19(3), e15-e28. doi:10.4037/ajcc2010866
Conference Date:
2010
Conference Name:
National Teaching Institute and Critical Care Exposition
Conference Host:
American Association of Critical-Care Nurses
Conference Location:
Washington, D.C., USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleIsolation Status Does Not Impact the Functional Outcome of Surgical IMC Patientsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorSwoboda, Sandraen_GB
dc.contributor.authorLipsett, Pamelaen_GB
dc.author.detailsSandra Swoboda, RN,MS, Johns Hopkins, Baltimore, Maryland, USA, email: sswoboda@jhmi.edu; Pamela Lipsetten_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157056-
dc.description.abstractPOSTER PURPOSE: To determine whether isolation for infection control has an impact on the functional outcome (FO) of patients in a surgical intermediate care unit (SIMC) compared with patients who are not isolated as measured by the Short Form health survey (SF-20). BACKGROUND/SIGNIFICANCE:Isolation is routinely used to prevent the spread of drug-resistant infection. Evidence suggests that isolated patients receive inferior care and have fewer interactions with health care workers than nonisolated patients; thus it is unknown whether this has an effect on the patients&AElig; long-term FO. The SF-20 measures 6 health domains: physical, pain, role function, social function, mental health, and health perception. It is quick and easy to use, and it reports the patients&AElig; perception of their current health status. METHOD: As part of a prospective study examining the impact of isolation status on the process of care in SIMC patients with a length of stay (LOS) >2 days, we administered the SF-20 at serial time points to determine FO: at baseline (for prehospital status), at SIMC admission, at hospital discharge, and at 1 and 3 months after discharge). Patients were grouped by isolation status. Both t tests and longitudinal data analysis were performed and sample size power was calculated; significance was P < .05. RESULTS: Over 5 months, 104 patients (28 isolated, 76 nonisolated) had a LOS > 2 days, and 36 patients consented to participate (14 isolated, 22 nonisolated). No significant differences were found between groups in demographics, underlying medical diseases, APACHE II score, or SIMC or hospital LOS. The mean SF-20 score was not different between isolated vs non-isolated groups at baseline (54 vs 61; P = .43), discharge (37 vs 37; P = .97), 1 month (40 vs 42; P = .77), and 3 months (42 vs 52; P = .23). Physical component scores decreased in both groups from baseline to hospital discharge (P > .20). The overall health perception of patients in both groups declined from baseline but had returned to baseline levels by 3 months (P=.24). CONCLUSIONS: Total SF-20 scores decline during hospitalization and slowly return to prehospital range by 3 months after discharge (physical and role categories are affected the most). Because the study was underpowered (0.11), we could not prove that isolation status had an influence on any aspect of FO. However, these data can be used in discharge planning and interventions for recovery from surgical illness.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:22:57Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-26en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:22:57Z-
dc.identifier.citation2010 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 19(3), e15-e28. doi:10.4037/ajcc2010866en_GB
dc.conference.date2010en_GB
dc.conference.nameNational Teaching Institute and Critical Care Expositionen_GB
dc.conference.hostAmerican Association of Critical-Care Nursesen_GB
dc.conference.locationWashington, D.C., USAen_GB
dc.identifier.citation2010 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 19(3), e15-e28. doi:10.4037/ajcc2010866en_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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