2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157062
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Pediatric Organ Donation: Creating a Culture of Best Practices in Donation Requests
Author(s):
Vaupel-Phillips, Juliet A.; Cohen, Jennifer
Author Details:
Juliet A. Vaupel-Phillips, RN,MS,BA,CCRN, CHOC Children's Hospital, Orange, California, USA, email: jphillips@choc.org; Jennifer Cohen
Abstract:
PURPOSE: To address a decrease in organ conversion rates, the PICU at CHOC Children's partnered with the organ procurement organization (OPO) to change how families are approached for donation requests. Team "huddles" between the health care team and OPO have been implemented to discuss, on a case-by-case basis, who is the most appropriate person to initiate the donation discussion with the family. This collaboration has led to significant improvement in procurement outcomes. DESCRIPTION: In 2006, the OPO strongly recommended that physicians stop initiating organ donation discussions with the families. The rationale was that consent rates would increase if the request for donation is made by a member of the OPO. Before this change, our organization had a 71% organ donation conversion rate. In 2007, this rate dropped to 20%. To address this significant decrease, a multidisciplinary team of OPO representatives, nurses, and physicians met to evaluate past and current practices and determine areas for improvement. The team felt strongly that, in most cases, because they have an established relationship, the physicians are the appropriate people to approach the sensitive subject of donation with the family. The team agreed upon defined roles that the PICU and the OPO would play in this process. Additionally, the importance of the roles of chaplain, child-life, psychology, and social services were discussed. It was agreed that a real time "huddle" would occur for each case to determine family approach and support. Policies and procedures were updated to reflect the practice changes and education was completed with physicians, associates, and the OPO. EVALUATION/OUTCOMES:Through the combined efforts of the PICU and the OPO to increase communication and shared-decision making, the donor conversion rates increased from 21% in 2007 to 75% in 2008. This year, CHOC received the Organ Donation Medal of Honor from the Department of Health and Human Services for sustained improvements in organ procurement. The physicians and associates in the PICU have expressed increased satisfaction with the team approach to supporting grieving families with this difficult decision. This creative solution has met the organizational strategic goal of creating a family-centered experience by promoting dignity/respect, information sharing, participation, and collaboration.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
26-Oct-2011
Citation:
2010 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 19(3), e15-e28. doi:10.4037/ajcc2010866
Conference Date:
2010
Conference Name:
National Teaching Institute and Critical Care Exposition
Conference Host:
American Association of Critical-Care Nurses
Conference Location:
Washington, D.C., USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePediatric Organ Donation: Creating a Culture of Best Practices in Donation Requestsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorVaupel-Phillips, Juliet A.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorCohen, Jenniferen_GB
dc.author.detailsJuliet A. Vaupel-Phillips, RN,MS,BA,CCRN, CHOC Children's Hospital, Orange, California, USA, email: jphillips@choc.org; Jennifer Cohenen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157062-
dc.description.abstractPURPOSE: To address a decrease in organ conversion rates, the PICU at CHOC Children's partnered with the organ procurement organization (OPO) to change how families are approached for donation requests. Team "huddles" between the health care team and OPO have been implemented to discuss, on a case-by-case basis, who is the most appropriate person to initiate the donation discussion with the family. This collaboration has led to significant improvement in procurement outcomes. DESCRIPTION: In 2006, the OPO strongly recommended that physicians stop initiating organ donation discussions with the families. The rationale was that consent rates would increase if the request for donation is made by a member of the OPO. Before this change, our organization had a 71% organ donation conversion rate. In 2007, this rate dropped to 20%. To address this significant decrease, a multidisciplinary team of OPO representatives, nurses, and physicians met to evaluate past and current practices and determine areas for improvement. The team felt strongly that, in most cases, because they have an established relationship, the physicians are the appropriate people to approach the sensitive subject of donation with the family. The team agreed upon defined roles that the PICU and the OPO would play in this process. Additionally, the importance of the roles of chaplain, child-life, psychology, and social services were discussed. It was agreed that a real time "huddle" would occur for each case to determine family approach and support. Policies and procedures were updated to reflect the practice changes and education was completed with physicians, associates, and the OPO. EVALUATION/OUTCOMES:Through the combined efforts of the PICU and the OPO to increase communication and shared-decision making, the donor conversion rates increased from 21% in 2007 to 75% in 2008. This year, CHOC received the Organ Donation Medal of Honor from the Department of Health and Human Services for sustained improvements in organ procurement. The physicians and associates in the PICU have expressed increased satisfaction with the team approach to supporting grieving families with this difficult decision. This creative solution has met the organizational strategic goal of creating a family-centered experience by promoting dignity/respect, information sharing, participation, and collaboration.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:23:13Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-26en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:23:13Z-
dc.identifier.citation2010 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 19(3), e15-e28. doi:10.4037/ajcc2010866en_GB
dc.conference.date2010en_GB
dc.conference.nameNational Teaching Institute and Critical Care Expositionen_GB
dc.conference.hostAmerican Association of Critical-Care Nursesen_GB
dc.conference.locationWashington, D.C., USAen_GB
dc.identifier.citation2010 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 19(3), e15-e28. doi:10.4037/ajcc2010866en_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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