Quantitative and Qualitative Examination of Nurses' Attitudes and Decision-Making in response to Rapid Response Teams

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157063
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Quantitative and Qualitative Examination of Nurses' Attitudes and Decision-Making in response to Rapid Response Teams
Author(s):
Wavelet, Jacqueline
Author Details:
Jacqueline Wavelet, APRN,MSNc, Inova Mount Vernon Hospital, Alexandria, Virginia, USA, email: Jacqueline.Wavelet@inova.org
Abstract:
POSTER PURPOSE: Rapid response teams (RRTs) were implemented at our community hospital as a tool to decrease "failure to rescue" and to support the bedside nurse by bringing a critical care team to the bedside to quickly assess and treat clinically unstable patients. Using qualitative and quantitative methods, we explored nursesÆ attitudes and decision making around RRTs. BACKGROUND/SIGNIFICANCE:RRTs were developed to bring clinical expertise and early intervention to the bedside for patients as soon as they show signs of clinical deterioration. Such teams have been shown to decrease the rate of "failure to rescue," a significant indicator of nursing quality. Little nursing research has explored nursing attitudes and use of the RRT. METHOD: The initial study was a quantitative descriptive survey involving a convenience sample of 140 registered nurses (RNs), using the 17-item Nurses Attitude to Rapid Response Team Survey. Descriptive statistics were used to analyze the data. We are doing a follow-up qualitative study to explore nursesÆ decision making about when to call an RRT versus the house officer or physician. We will use focus groups and semistructured discussions to elicit information and explore nursesÆ critical thinking about how they make those decisions. Three researchers will separately analyze the transcripts for concepts and code them, comparing results to assess interrater reliability. RESULTS: 95% of the nurses felt that the RRT prevents unstable patients from having an arrest. 96% of the nurses indicated that the RRT offered them the opportunity to seek help in managing patients they were worried about. 72% of the nurses thought that the RRT was not overused in the management of hospital patients. Only 13% of nurses indicated that they would not call the RRT for fear of being criticized for not taking good care of their patients. 52% of the nurses indicated that they would call the house physician before the RRT. CONCLUSIONS: Despite the positive attitudes and the established hospital protocol for calling the RRT, 52% of the nurses indicated that they would call the house physician before the RRT. Nursing needs a better understanding of nursesÆ critical thinking about how they make decisions in response to a patientÆs deteriorating clinical condition.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
26-Oct-2011
Citation:
2010 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 19(3), e15-e28. doi:10.4037/ajcc2010866
Conference Date:
2010
Conference Name:
National Teaching Institute and Critical Care Exposition
Conference Host:
American Association of Critical-Care Nurses
Conference Location:
Washington, D.C., USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleQuantitative and Qualitative Examination of Nurses' Attitudes and Decision-Making in response to Rapid Response Teamsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorWavelet, Jacquelineen_GB
dc.author.detailsJacqueline Wavelet, APRN,MSNc, Inova Mount Vernon Hospital, Alexandria, Virginia, USA, email: Jacqueline.Wavelet@inova.orgen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157063-
dc.description.abstractPOSTER PURPOSE: Rapid response teams (RRTs) were implemented at our community hospital as a tool to decrease "failure to rescue" and to support the bedside nurse by bringing a critical care team to the bedside to quickly assess and treat clinically unstable patients. Using qualitative and quantitative methods, we explored nursesÆ attitudes and decision making around RRTs. BACKGROUND/SIGNIFICANCE:RRTs were developed to bring clinical expertise and early intervention to the bedside for patients as soon as they show signs of clinical deterioration. Such teams have been shown to decrease the rate of "failure to rescue," a significant indicator of nursing quality. Little nursing research has explored nursing attitudes and use of the RRT. METHOD: The initial study was a quantitative descriptive survey involving a convenience sample of 140 registered nurses (RNs), using the 17-item Nurses Attitude to Rapid Response Team Survey. Descriptive statistics were used to analyze the data. We are doing a follow-up qualitative study to explore nursesÆ decision making about when to call an RRT versus the house officer or physician. We will use focus groups and semistructured discussions to elicit information and explore nursesÆ critical thinking about how they make those decisions. Three researchers will separately analyze the transcripts for concepts and code them, comparing results to assess interrater reliability. RESULTS: 95% of the nurses felt that the RRT prevents unstable patients from having an arrest. 96% of the nurses indicated that the RRT offered them the opportunity to seek help in managing patients they were worried about. 72% of the nurses thought that the RRT was not overused in the management of hospital patients. Only 13% of nurses indicated that they would not call the RRT for fear of being criticized for not taking good care of their patients. 52% of the nurses indicated that they would call the house physician before the RRT. CONCLUSIONS: Despite the positive attitudes and the established hospital protocol for calling the RRT, 52% of the nurses indicated that they would call the house physician before the RRT. Nursing needs a better understanding of nursesÆ critical thinking about how they make decisions in response to a patientÆs deteriorating clinical condition.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:23:16Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-26en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:23:16Z-
dc.identifier.citation2010 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 19(3), e15-e28. doi:10.4037/ajcc2010866en_GB
dc.conference.date2010en_GB
dc.conference.nameNational Teaching Institute and Critical Care Expositionen_GB
dc.conference.hostAmerican Association of Critical-Care Nursesen_GB
dc.conference.locationWashington, D.C., USAen_GB
dc.identifier.citation2010 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 19(3), e15-e28. doi:10.4037/ajcc2010866en_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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