2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157067
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Use of an assessment tool to identify level of risk for accidental extubation
Author(s):
Hayman, Annette
Author Details:
Annette Hayman, APN BC, CCRN, CPUR, CCM, St. Joseph's Candler Health System, Savannah, GA, USA, email: llh135@aol.com
Abstract:
Accidental extubation (AE) is the unplanned removal of an endotracheal tube from its proper position in the trachea and could result in life threatening complications and prolonged hospitalization. An assessment tool (AERAT) was developed to assess mechanical, psychological, and physiological factors which could increase the level of risk for AE. Betty Neuman's Systems Model was employed as a framework which addresses the goal of nursing as protecting the basic structure of the intubated patient by identifying stressors that would provoke reaction (potential risk factors), by preventing stressor invasion (AE/complications), and by removing stressors that exists (actual risk factors). The purpose of this descriptive study was to determine the effectiveness of AERAT in identifying the level of risk for AE in an adult medical-surgical ICU population. The two research hypotheses tested were that there is a relationship between (1) the level of risk identified and the incidence of AE and (2) the level of risk identified and the incidence of AE. Data was collected prospectively and retrospectively on patients experiencing AE to determine level of risk. Each patient was then scored based on the number and type of risk factors demonstrated. Fifty nine (59) patients accounted for 60 episodes of intubation and 9 AE. Chi-square analysis demonstrated weak significant findings regarding the relationship of level of risk and the incidence of AE. There were significant findings in the relationship between being intubated less than 72 hours, not being restrained, communicating the desire to be extubated, and being agitated, combative, and confused despite sedation. The AERAT was found to be clinically valuable as a mechanism which promotes the prevention of AE. Further research is needed to refine the scoring mechanism for level of risk.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
26-Oct-2011
Citation:
2009 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 18(3), e1-e17.
Conference Date:
1994
Conference Host:
American Association of Critical-Care Nurses
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleUse of an assessment tool to identify level of risk for accidental extubationen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHayman, Annetteen_GB
dc.author.detailsAnnette Hayman, APN BC, CCRN, CPUR, CCM, St. Joseph's Candler Health System, Savannah, GA, USA, email: llh135@aol.comen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157067-
dc.description.abstractAccidental extubation (AE) is the unplanned removal of an endotracheal tube from its proper position in the trachea and could result in life threatening complications and prolonged hospitalization. An assessment tool (AERAT) was developed to assess mechanical, psychological, and physiological factors which could increase the level of risk for AE. Betty Neuman's Systems Model was employed as a framework which addresses the goal of nursing as protecting the basic structure of the intubated patient by identifying stressors that would provoke reaction (potential risk factors), by preventing stressor invasion (AE/complications), and by removing stressors that exists (actual risk factors). The purpose of this descriptive study was to determine the effectiveness of AERAT in identifying the level of risk for AE in an adult medical-surgical ICU population. The two research hypotheses tested were that there is a relationship between (1) the level of risk identified and the incidence of AE and (2) the level of risk identified and the incidence of AE. Data was collected prospectively and retrospectively on patients experiencing AE to determine level of risk. Each patient was then scored based on the number and type of risk factors demonstrated. Fifty nine (59) patients accounted for 60 episodes of intubation and 9 AE. Chi-square analysis demonstrated weak significant findings regarding the relationship of level of risk and the incidence of AE. There were significant findings in the relationship between being intubated less than 72 hours, not being restrained, communicating the desire to be extubated, and being agitated, combative, and confused despite sedation. The AERAT was found to be clinically valuable as a mechanism which promotes the prevention of AE. Further research is needed to refine the scoring mechanism for level of risk.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:23:29Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-26en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:23:29Z-
dc.identifier.citation2009 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 18(3), e1-e17.en_GB
dc.conference.date1994en_GB
dc.conference.hostAmerican Association of Critical-Care Nursesen_GB
dc.identifier.citation2009 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 18(3), e1-e17.en_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.