Multicenter Study Of Bacteria On Reused Clean ECG Leadwires: Are Monitored Patients At Risk For Nosocomial Infections?

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157068
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Multicenter Study Of Bacteria On Reused Clean ECG Leadwires: Are Monitored Patients At Risk For Nosocomial Infections?
Author(s):
Albert, Nancy; Hancock, Kelly; Krajewski, Susan; Karafa, Matthew; Rice, Karen; Fowler, Susan; Nadeau, Colleen
Author Details:
Nancy M. Albert, PhD, CCNS, CHFN, CCRN, NE-BC, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH, USA, email: albertn@ccf.org; Kelly Hancock; Susan Krajewski; Matthew Karafa; Karen Rice; Susan Fowler; and Colleen Nadeau
Abstract:
PURPOSE: To assess the presence of bacterial microorganisms and number of different microorganisms on 320 clean, but not currently in use, electrocardiography leadwires (ECG-LW) sampled from surgical or medical critical care (CC), surgical or medical telemetry (Tel) units, emergency care department (ED) and operating rooms (OR) of 4 large hospitals (bed size of 481 to > 1000) with Magnet status and cleaning policies, 2 urban teaching, 1 community teaching and 1 community non-teaching hospital. BACKGROUND: Reprocessing of reusable ECG-LW is a potential source of microorganisms capable of causing nosocomial infection in hospitalized patients. However, little is known about actual growth of pathogenic microorganisms on clean ECG-LW that are ready for use by incoming patients. METHODS: Study teams, led by laboratory personnel, wore mask, gown, and gloves during swabbing, and carried out procedures in 1 day. The 24 bacterial species identified were grouped by risk for human infection: at risk (n = 9 bacteria), potential risk (n = 5 bacteria), and no risk (n = 10). Presence of bacteria models were generated using a generalized estimating equation logistic model adjusting for multiple species on some ECG-LW. Number of bacteria species per ECG-LW was analyzed by Poisson regression model. Pairwise differences were used to determine differences in sites and units; and differences were Bonferroni corrected for the 6 comparisons, resulting in a significance criterion of P<0.0083. RESULTS: Of organism growth, 226 bacteria were identified on 201 (63%) ECG-LW and varied by site from 49% to 80%. At risk or potential risk bacterial growths were found on 121 ECG-LW (37.8%; range 28.8%-43.8%). Both urban hospitals had less bacterial growth (all P=0.01) and fewer bacterial species per ECG-LW (all P=0.01) than both community hospitals; and the largest urban hospital had less at-risk growth and number of species than the other 3 sites (all P<0.05). By clinical area, presence of any bacteria (P=0.02) and number of bacteria species per ECG-LW (P=0.002) differed with OR having less growth and number of species than other areas (both P<0.02) and ED and Tel having more growth than CC. CONCLUSIONS: Reusable clean ECG-LW carry microorganisms that can potentially cause human nosocomial infection, especially in immunologically compromised patients or those with open wounds. Bacterial growth and number of species differed by hospital and clinical area. Further study is warranted to determine the rate of nosocomial infection from reusable ECG-LW, prevalence of resistant bacteria on ECG-LW, and potential association between cleaning policies and bacterial growth.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
26-Oct-2011
Citation:
2009 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 18(3), e1-e17.
Conference Date:
2009
Conference Name:
National Teaching Institute and Critical Care Exposition
Conference Host:
American Association of Critical-Care Nurses
Conference Location:
New Orleans, Louisiana, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMulticenter Study Of Bacteria On Reused Clean ECG Leadwires: Are Monitored Patients At Risk For Nosocomial Infections?en_GB
dc.contributor.authorAlbert, Nancyen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHancock, Kellyen_GB
dc.contributor.authorKrajewski, Susanen_GB
dc.contributor.authorKarafa, Matthewen_GB
dc.contributor.authorRice, Karenen_GB
dc.contributor.authorFowler, Susanen_GB
dc.contributor.authorNadeau, Colleenen_GB
dc.author.detailsNancy M. Albert, PhD, CCNS, CHFN, CCRN, NE-BC, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH, USA, email: albertn@ccf.org; Kelly Hancock; Susan Krajewski; Matthew Karafa; Karen Rice; Susan Fowler; and Colleen Nadeauen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157068-
dc.description.abstractPURPOSE: To assess the presence of bacterial microorganisms and number of different microorganisms on 320 clean, but not currently in use, electrocardiography leadwires (ECG-LW) sampled from surgical or medical critical care (CC), surgical or medical telemetry (Tel) units, emergency care department (ED) and operating rooms (OR) of 4 large hospitals (bed size of 481 to > 1000) with Magnet status and cleaning policies, 2 urban teaching, 1 community teaching and 1 community non-teaching hospital. BACKGROUND: Reprocessing of reusable ECG-LW is a potential source of microorganisms capable of causing nosocomial infection in hospitalized patients. However, little is known about actual growth of pathogenic microorganisms on clean ECG-LW that are ready for use by incoming patients. METHODS: Study teams, led by laboratory personnel, wore mask, gown, and gloves during swabbing, and carried out procedures in 1 day. The 24 bacterial species identified were grouped by risk for human infection: at risk (n = 9 bacteria), potential risk (n = 5 bacteria), and no risk (n = 10). Presence of bacteria models were generated using a generalized estimating equation logistic model adjusting for multiple species on some ECG-LW. Number of bacteria species per ECG-LW was analyzed by Poisson regression model. Pairwise differences were used to determine differences in sites and units; and differences were Bonferroni corrected for the 6 comparisons, resulting in a significance criterion of P<0.0083. RESULTS: Of organism growth, 226 bacteria were identified on 201 (63%) ECG-LW and varied by site from 49% to 80%. At risk or potential risk bacterial growths were found on 121 ECG-LW (37.8%; range 28.8%-43.8%). Both urban hospitals had less bacterial growth (all P=0.01) and fewer bacterial species per ECG-LW (all P=0.01) than both community hospitals; and the largest urban hospital had less at-risk growth and number of species than the other 3 sites (all P<0.05). By clinical area, presence of any bacteria (P=0.02) and number of bacteria species per ECG-LW (P=0.002) differed with OR having less growth and number of species than other areas (both P<0.02) and ED and Tel having more growth than CC. CONCLUSIONS: Reusable clean ECG-LW carry microorganisms that can potentially cause human nosocomial infection, especially in immunologically compromised patients or those with open wounds. Bacterial growth and number of species differed by hospital and clinical area. Further study is warranted to determine the rate of nosocomial infection from reusable ECG-LW, prevalence of resistant bacteria on ECG-LW, and potential association between cleaning policies and bacterial growth.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:23:33Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-26en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:23:33Z-
dc.identifier.citation2009 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 18(3), e1-e17.en_GB
dc.conference.date2009en_GB
dc.conference.nameNational Teaching Institute and Critical Care Expositionen_GB
dc.conference.hostAmerican Association of Critical-Care Nursesen_GB
dc.conference.locationNew Orleans, Louisiana, USAen_GB
dc.identifier.citation2009 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 18(3), e1-e17.en_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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