Impact of Antimicrobial Products (AMD) on the Infection Rate (HA SSI) in the CV Surgery Population

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157072
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Impact of Antimicrobial Products (AMD) on the Infection Rate (HA SSI) in the CV Surgery Population
Author(s):
Bernhardt-Tindal, Kim; Moore, Cathy
Author Details:
Kim Bernhardt-Tindal, Gaston Memorial Hospital, Gastonia, NC, USA, email: tindalk@gmh.org; Cathy Moore
Abstract:
PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to determine if the use of an antimicrobial dressing (AMD) on cardiovascular surgical wounds immediately post-op would decrease our HA SSI rate. BACKGROUND: Despite advances in infection control practices, surgical site infections cause prolonged hospital stays, increased costs for patients, providers and hospitals, and contributes to increased morbidity and mortality. The CDC estimates that 14-16% of hospital associated infections are attributed to Surgical Site Infections (SSIs). The estimated savings for just one infection is $25,546.00, not to mention improved patient outcomes. METHODS: Baseline data was obtained from January 1, 2007 until July 31, 2007 utilizing chart review for all CABG-Chest and Leg wounds. The Evaluation Period was the same months in 2008. The study population included all in-patients with surgical wounds classified as either Clean (Class I) or Clean Contaminated (Class II) who developed a surgical infection within 30 days of the surgical date. In Dec 2007, we converted gauze, Telfa, Kerlix, etc. to the AMD product. This dressing is impregnated with a 0.2% concentration of mild antiseptic solution and is used as the primary skin dressing. By changing all the product in our facility, we made sure that compliance would be 100%. RESULTS: Targeted Surgical Procedure, CABG (CBGB) Chest and Leg- please contact the primary investigator for the table view of the following study results: Baseline Period, Evaluation Period and Overall Change. Total Number of SSIs: 7, 1, and 82%. Total Number of Procedures: 127 and 101. HA SSI Infection Rate Per 100 Targeted Procedures: 5.5 and 0.99. Type of SSI - (Leg):3, 1 and 58.6%. HA SSI Infection Rate Per 100 Targeted Procedures: 2.4 and 0.99. Type of SSI - (Chest): 4, 0 and 100%. HA SSI Infection Rate Per 100 Targeted Procedures: 3.1 and 0. CONCLUSIONS: Without a noticeable change in clinical practice, we were able to demonstrate an 82% reduction in our Hospital Acquired Infection rate from the Baseline Period to the Evaluation Period in our combined Cardiovascular surgical wounds. Additional surgeries (C sections, Abd Hysterectomies and Peripheral Vascular Surgeries) were also included in the study. The cumulative outcome was a 91% reduction in the hospital wide HA SSI rate. We are currently changing to this product.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
26-Oct-2011
Citation:
2009 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 18(3), e1-e17.
Conference Date:
2009
Conference Name:
National Teaching Institute and Critical Care Exposition
Conference Host:
American Association of Critical-Care Nurses
Conference Location:
New Orleans, Louisiana, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleImpact of Antimicrobial Products (AMD) on the Infection Rate (HA SSI) in the CV Surgery Populationen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBernhardt-Tindal, Kimen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMoore, Cathyen_GB
dc.author.detailsKim Bernhardt-Tindal, Gaston Memorial Hospital, Gastonia, NC, USA, email: tindalk@gmh.org; Cathy Mooreen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157072-
dc.description.abstractPURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to determine if the use of an antimicrobial dressing (AMD) on cardiovascular surgical wounds immediately post-op would decrease our HA SSI rate. BACKGROUND: Despite advances in infection control practices, surgical site infections cause prolonged hospital stays, increased costs for patients, providers and hospitals, and contributes to increased morbidity and mortality. The CDC estimates that 14-16% of hospital associated infections are attributed to Surgical Site Infections (SSIs). The estimated savings for just one infection is $25,546.00, not to mention improved patient outcomes. METHODS: Baseline data was obtained from January 1, 2007 until July 31, 2007 utilizing chart review for all CABG-Chest and Leg wounds. The Evaluation Period was the same months in 2008. The study population included all in-patients with surgical wounds classified as either Clean (Class I) or Clean Contaminated (Class II) who developed a surgical infection within 30 days of the surgical date. In Dec 2007, we converted gauze, Telfa, Kerlix, etc. to the AMD product. This dressing is impregnated with a 0.2% concentration of mild antiseptic solution and is used as the primary skin dressing. By changing all the product in our facility, we made sure that compliance would be 100%. RESULTS: Targeted Surgical Procedure, CABG (CBGB) Chest and Leg- please contact the primary investigator for the table view of the following study results: Baseline Period, Evaluation Period and Overall Change. Total Number of SSIs: 7, 1, and 82%. Total Number of Procedures: 127 and 101. HA SSI Infection Rate Per 100 Targeted Procedures: 5.5 and 0.99. Type of SSI - (Leg):3, 1 and 58.6%. HA SSI Infection Rate Per 100 Targeted Procedures: 2.4 and 0.99. Type of SSI - (Chest): 4, 0 and 100%. HA SSI Infection Rate Per 100 Targeted Procedures: 3.1 and 0. CONCLUSIONS: Without a noticeable change in clinical practice, we were able to demonstrate an 82% reduction in our Hospital Acquired Infection rate from the Baseline Period to the Evaluation Period in our combined Cardiovascular surgical wounds. Additional surgeries (C sections, Abd Hysterectomies and Peripheral Vascular Surgeries) were also included in the study. The cumulative outcome was a 91% reduction in the hospital wide HA SSI rate. We are currently changing to this product.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T19:23:46Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-26en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T19:23:46Z-
dc.identifier.citation2009 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 18(3), e1-e17.en_GB
dc.conference.date2009en_GB
dc.conference.nameNational Teaching Institute and Critical Care Expositionen_GB
dc.conference.hostAmerican Association of Critical-Care Nursesen_GB
dc.conference.locationNew Orleans, Louisiana, USAen_GB
dc.identifier.citation2009 National Teaching Institute Research Abstracts. American Journal of Critical Care, 18(3), e1-e17.en_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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